CORN  
Delivery Date Cash Price Basis Futures Change Futures Price
History Sep17 3.05 09/22/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.49
 3'2
353'4s
History Oct17 3.09 09/22/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.45
 3'2
353'4s
History Nov17 3.09 09/22/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.45
 3'2
353'4s
History Dec17 3.16 09/22/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.38
 3'2
353'4s
History Jan18 3.19 09/22/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.47
 3'0
366'0s
History Feb18 3.21 09/22/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.45
 3'0
366'0s
History Mar18 3.23 09/22/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.43
 3'0
366'0s
History Apr18 3.29 09/22/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.46
 3'2
374'4s
History May18 3.31 09/22/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.44
 3'2
374'4s
History Oct18 3.57 09/22/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.40
 3'0
396'4s
History Nov18 3.57 09/22/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.40
 3'0
396'4s
 
SOYBEANS  
Delivery Date Cash Price Basis Futures Change Futures Price
History Sep17 8.91 09/22/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.93
 13'4
984'2s
History Oct17 8.89 09/22/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.95
 13'4
984'2s
History Nov17 8.89 09/22/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.95
 13'4
984'2s
History Dec17 8.95 09/22/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -1.00
 13'4
994'4s
History Jan18 8.99 09/22/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -1.05
 13'2
1003'4s
History Oct18 9.04 09/22/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.95
 9'6
998'4s
National
Midday cash livestock markets
  Light to moderate cash cattle trade is developing with live prices about $2.00 higher than last week.? While bids are firming up in parts of the North, business has not yet developed given the higher asking prices of $172 to $174.? Look for more trade to develop before mid-afternoon as short-bought packers move to cover immediate needs.? Bids are reported at $108.00 live and $166.00 to $170.00 dressed. Boxed beef cutout is firm at the midday with light to moderate box movement.? Continue reading Midday cash livestock markets at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
FMC Corp. Receives Clearances to Acquire DuPont Crop Protection Assets
FMC Corp. has received approval from the Competition Commission of India (CCI) for the proposed acquisition of a significant portion of DuPont’s Crop Protection business. The CCI is the final jurisdiction to grant antitrust clearance needed to satisfy regulatory conditions for closing. “FMC is pleased to have received CCI’s approval,” said Pierre Brondeau, FMC president, CEO and chairman. “We are on track to close our transactions with DuPont on November 1, 2017.” FMC announced on March 31, 2017 the signing of a definitive agreement for FMC to acquire a portion of DuPont’s Crop Protection business that it must divest to comply with the European Commission ruling related to its merger with The Dow Chemical Company. FMC will acquire DuPont’s global chewing pest insecticide portfolio, its global cereal broadleaf herbicides, and substantially all of DuPont’s global crop protection R&D capabilities. Additionally, DuPont will acquire FMC’s Health and Nutrition segment and receive $1.2 billion in cash.
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Got our first picture in! Thanks for sharing!
Got our first picture in! Thanks for sharing!>
Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for a full-time with ...
Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for a full-time with benefits Grain Hedge Desk Coordinator. This position coordinates all activities effected by grain commodity hedging. Will lead analysis and execution of daily trading activities, support development, updating, interpretation, and auditing of daily grain reports, and interact with grain trading, origination, and back office operations to support daily activities. Requires a minimum of a Bachelor's degree and experience with commodity futures market is preferred. Apply here: http://auroracoop.com/ContactUs. Resume can also be sent to Aurora Cooperative, PO Box 209, Aurora, NE 68818, Attn: Human Resources. Aurora Cooperative is an equal opportunity employer.>
Harvest is here and it's time for another photo contest! We did this ...
Harvest is here and it's time for another photo contest! We did this during planting season and we want to do it again! Send us your best harvest pictures throughout the season, whether it be from the cab, during the night, or with your favorite combine riders we want to see them! All you have to do is submit your picture and like our page! A winner will be picked every Friday and they will receive a $50 gift card to Cabela's. We are going to do this the entire harvest season! We wish you a safe harvest!>
Yesterday?s price action was neutral but futures overnight were ...
Yesterday?s price action was neutral but futures overnight were supported with continued talk of strong bean demand. Chinese soybean, meal, and corn values have been higher this week supporting the demand outlook here in the US. The US Dollar is also lower this morning helping support CME grains. Continued dryness in Australia has traders continuing to lower wheat production estimates. On the open at 8:30 a.m., corn trading 2 cents higher, soybeans up a dime, KC wheat a penny higher.>
Harvest is underway! Our Sedan terminal was busy today and into the ...
Harvest is underway! Our Sedan terminal was busy today and into the night! Our lights are on until yours are off! #harvest17>
Futures overnight traded both sides of unchanged in light volume. ...
Futures overnight traded both sides of unchanged in light volume. Yesterday afternoon, the USDA reported that corn harvest is 7% nationally, compared to 11% on average. Soybean harvest is 4% complete, only a point behind our historical average. The chatter in the marketplace continues about how crop conditions have been deteriorating and what the final production numbers will be. Traders continue to watch the dryness in Australia. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn up a penny, Soybeans down ? cent, and KC Wheat up 3 cents.>
AGRONOMY SERVICE POSITION Aurora Cooperative is accepting ...
AGRONOMY SERVICE POSITION Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for full-time agronomy service and applicator positions with benefits at the York location. CDL and Hazmat preferred or able to obtain one. Contact Danielle Scheele at 402-366-2583 or send application to 1320 Road L, York, NE 68467. Aurora Cooperative is an Equal Opportunity Employer.>
Grower Sam Morse shared his favorite Curry hybrids with our David ...
Grower Sam Morse shared his favorite Curry hybrids with our David City location. Be sure to contact your local Aurora Cooperative agronomist to be included in our early seed incentives! #YourYieldsMatter>
There was not a lot of fresh fundamental news overnight. Harvest is ...
There was not a lot of fresh fundamental news overnight. Harvest is starting and moving along a very slow pace. Yield reports are coming in consistent with the crop tours last month -- variable. Weather remains mixed as the western Corn Belt is expected to receive additional moisture this week while the eastern region remains relatively dry. Crop progress will be released at 3 p.m. this afternoon and the trade is looking for steady to slightly lower crop conditions. On the open at 8:30 a.m., corn down 3 cents, soybeans up a penny, and KC Wheat down 4.>
Be sure to come visit our tailgate!! We have Brenden Stai and Calvin ...
Be sure to come visit our tailgate!! We have Brenden Stai and Calvin Jones here hanging out with us! ??
Don't forget our premium E15 blend available only at the Service ...
Don't forget our premium E15 blend available only at the Service Center, located on M Street in Aurora, will also be 25 cents off at the pump as well as our E15 at the other locations! Be sure to stop by and fill up on your way out of town for the game! #YourCornYourEthanol>
The smile on a happy farmer-owners' face is something we strive for ...
The smile on a happy farmer-owners' face is something we strive for every day. It takes great responsibility from both the employee and the owner to achieve this. Great partnerships and a systems approach with products is a winning combination that allows for great successes...but it takes both. Can't wait to see how this field yields at harvest! Check out our photo story below!>
September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month...so today we wore ...
September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month...so today we wore yellow ribbons
>
The soybean market is 3-4 cents lower on the open but are up a dime ...
The soybean market is 3-4 cents lower on the open but are up a dime for the week. The bean market has the potential to close higher for the 4th consecutive week in a row. Not a whole lot of fresh news is expected to be reported today with the exception of the NOPA crush numbers. The average estimate for August crush is 137.5 million bushels, this could be the largest crush number in 10 years. On the open at 8:30 a.m., corn down a penny, soybeans down 3-4, KC Wheat unchanged.>
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Got our first picture in! Thanks for sharing!>
Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for a full-time with ...
Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for a full-time with benefits Grain Hedge Desk Coordinator. This position coordinates all activities effected by grain commodity hedging. Will lead analysis and execution of daily trading activities, support development, updating, interpretation, and auditing of daily grain reports, and interact with grain trading, origination, and back office operations to support daily activities. Requires a minimum of a Bachelor's degree and experience with commodity futures market is preferred. Apply here: http://auroracoop.com/ContactUs. Resume can also be sent to Aurora Cooperative, PO Box 209, Aurora, NE 68818, Attn: Human Resources. Aurora Cooperative is an equal opportunity employer.>
Nebraska Ag Update - September 22, 2017
Nebraska Ag Updates
Fall Grazing Offers Opportunities and Challenges
After a summer of drought in North Dakota, pastures have been used heavily and cattle producers are looking for forage options to get them through the fall. “In areas that have received late-summer rains, producers may be able to benefit from green-up of pastures and hay land, regrowth from cereal and annual forages cut for hay, or crop volunteer regrowth,” says Janna Kincheloe, the North Dakota State University Extension Service’s area livestock systems specialist at the Hettinger Research Extension Center. “It is important to consider grazing management and potential plant and animal health implications when developing options for fall forage opportunities.” John Dhuyvetter, NDSU Extension area livestock systems specialist at the North Central Research Extension Center near Minot, adds “With continued moisture stress, and anticipated cooler temperatures and possible frosts, there are concerns with potential toxicities and transitioning cattle from a dry, fibrous mature plant diet to highly digestible immature regrowth.” One such concern is nitrate accumulation in regrowth of annual forage crops. Plants are immature and high in nitrogen. Clipping a representative sample and testing the crop prior to livestock turnout can provide an indication of nitrate levels and potential toxicity at a point in time. Prussic acid also can accumulate in several crops such as sorghum and sorghum-sudan grass crosses. The specialists recommend that producers avoid allowing their cattle to graze on these crops for at least seven to 10 days after a killing frost to let the plants dry. If conditions allow for regrowth after a frost, new shoots and leaves also are likely to be very high in prussic acid. Feeding these crops as green chop, silage or hay instead of allowing animals to graze them can reduce the risk of prussic acid poisoning. “Bloat also can be an issue anytime that cattle have an opportunity to consume large quantities of immature, highly digestible forage, particularly in pastures that are made up of 50 percent or more of legumes such as alfalfa or clover,” Kincheloe says. “Volunteer canola also carries risk of bloat.” The incidence of bloat tends to be greater early in the day, following a rain or after a frost. Best management practices include turning cattle into regrowth in midday after they’ve been grazing elsewhere and after a full feed of dry hay. “If possible, provide access to other grazing, such as a permanent pasture, simultaneously,” Dhuyvetter suggests. “Providing a poloxalene block prior to and during grazing and placing hay bales in the field for grazing are additional management considerations.” If volunteer grains matured to seed formation or abandoned areas of the field have mature grain, grain overload from selective grazing could be a problem. High grain intake by cattle not adapted to grain can lead to bloat, founder or death. To manage these issues, producers should use strip grazing to limit access and/or adapt cattle to grain a week or so prior to grazing. Kevin Sedivec, NDSU Extension rangeland management specialist, recommends that producers thinking of extending the grazing season into the fall on native range should try to use pastures that were deferred or lightly grazed during the growing season. Defoliation of plants at this time may limit the ability of the plants to store energy through the winter, which can impact forage production next spring. “If producers have no choice but to graze native pastures, they should try to maintain an adequate stubble height (typically 50 percent of ungrazed mature plant height or 4 to 6 inches, depending on plant species) and stock pastures lightly,” Sedivec says. “Pastures grazed late in the fall should not be used immediately during the following spring.” Regardless of what type of grazing a producer is considering, providing adequate salt and mineral is a good idea, according to the specialists. With rapid regrowth of cool-season forage, magnesium supplementation may be necessary to help cattle avoid grass tetany. “A variety of options are available for extending the grazing season into the fall and making efficient use of available resources,” Dhuyvetter states. “This can be particularly beneficial in getting calves to traditional weaning at good weights and putting some weight back on cows. With testing, avoiding turning hungry cows into unfamiliar feed and closely managing grazing, these opportunities can be managed successfully.” Source: North Dakota State University Extension
The World's Wheat Market Has Changed
The world’s wheat market has changed — and the result does not look good for the home team. During the last 10 years, world wheat production has increased 22 percent, and world consumption has increased 21 percent. World exports have increased 46 percent. U.S. production, total use, and exports have declined. At the beginning of the 2008/09 wheat marketing year (June 1, 2008), the five-year average world production was 22.1 billion bushels. At the beginning of the 2017/18 wheat marketing year, the five-year average world production was 27.0 billion bushels. The increase in world production was 4.9 billion bushel (22 percent). During this same 10-year period, U.S. wheat production (five-year averages) went from 2.09 billion bushels in 2008/09 to 2.045 billion bushels in 2017/18 — a 45 million bushel (2.2 percent) decline in U.S. production. WIDESPREAD PRODUCTION INCREASES Of the world’s 4.9 billion bushel increase in production, a 1.4 billion bushel increase (29 percent) was in the former Soviet Union (FSU-12) countries (Russia, 767 million bushels; the Ukraine, 440 million bushels; and Kazakhstan, 52 million bushels). China’s production increased 1.05 billion bushels (22 percent); production in the EU-28 increased 865 million bushels (18 percent); and production in India increased 788 million bushels (16 percent). Wheat production also increased in Canada (248 million bushels, 5 percent), Australia (214 million bushels, 4 percent), and Pakistan (163 million bushels, 3 percent). Lower production was reported in Argentina (-73 million bushels) and the U.S. (-38 million bushels). Production is a function of harvested acres and yields. In the 10-year period between 2007 and 2017 (using five-year averages), world wheat harvested acres increased from 529 million acres to 547 million acres (an 18 million acre increase). Increased harvested acres were reported for the FSU-12 (10.9 million acres), India (10 million acres), and the EU-28 (3.6 million acres). Lower harvested acres were reported for the U.S. (-6 million acres), Argentina (-3.7 million acres), and Australia (-1 million acres). YIELDS UP SUBSTANTIALLY On average, world wheat yields increased from 41.8 bushels per acre to 49.4 bushels. No major wheat producing country reported a decline in yields. Canada reported the highest yield increase, 10.4 bushels per acre, followed by the EU-28, reporting 9.2 bushels, and the FSU-12, with 9.1 bushels. The U.S. reported an increase of 4.9 bushels. Reported yields for the 2017/18 marketing year are 83 bushels per acre for the EU-28, 47 bushels for Argentina, 46 bushels for the U.S., 44 bushels for Canada, 41 bushels for the FSU-12 (the Ukraine-60, Russia-45, and Kasakastan-18), and for Australia, 27 bushels. At the beginning of the 2008/09 wheat marketing year, the world’s five-year average exports were 4.15 billion bushels. At the beginning of the 2017/18 wheat marketing year, the five-year average world exports were 6.35 billion bushels, a 2.2 billion bushel or 53 percent increase. Countries with increased exports were the FSU-12 (Russia 27 million bushels; the Ukraine 477 million bushels, and Kazakhstan 46 million bushels), the EU-28 (732 million bushels), Canada (218 million bushels), and Australia (215 million bushels). Lower exports were reported for the U.S. (-187 million bushels), and Argentina (-61 million bushels). During the last 10 years, world wheat production and exports have shifted to the FSU and EU countries, along with China and India. Improved production practices and technology may have resulted in higher yields and increased harvested acres. The facts indicate that the world wheat market has changed; those changes are probably permanent; and the changes are not favorable for U.S. wheat production or prices. Source: Kim Anderson, Southwest Farm Press
Harvest is here and it's time for another photo contest! We did this ...
Harvest is here and it's time for another photo contest! We did this during planting season and we want to do it again! Send us your best harvest pictures throughout the season, whether it be from the cab, during the night, or with your favorite combine riders we want to see them! All you have to do is submit your picture and like our page! A winner will be picked every Friday and they will receive a $50 gift card to Cabela's. We are going to do this the entire harvest season! We wish you a safe harvest!>
The World's Wheat Market Has Changed, and That's Not Favorable for the U.S.
The world’s wheat market has changed — and the result does not look good for the home team. During the last 10 years, world wheat production has increased 22 percent, and world consumption has increased 21 percent. World exports have increased 46 percent. U.S. production, total use, and exports have declined. At the beginning of the 2008/09 wheat marketing year (June 1, 2008), the five-year average world production was 22.1 billion bushels. At the beginning of the 2017/18 wheat marketing year, the five-year average world production was 27.0 billion bushels. The increase in world production was 4.9 billion bushel (22 percent). During this same 10-year period, U.S. wheat production (five-year averages) went from 2.09 billion bushels in 2008/09 to 2.045 billion bushels in 2017/18 — a 45 million bushel (2.2 percent) decline in U.S. production. WIDESPREAD PRODUCTION INCREASES Of the world’s 4.9 billion bushel increase in production, a 1.4 billion bushel increase (29 percent) was in the former Soviet Union (FSU-12) countries (Russia, 767 million bushels; the Ukraine, 440 million bushels; and Kazakhstan, 52 million bushels). China’s production increased 1.05 billion bushels (22 percent); production in the EU-28 increased 865 million bushels (18 percent); and production in India increased 788 million bushels (16 percent). Wheat production also increased in Canada (248 million bushels, 5 percent), Australia (214 million bushels, 4 percent), and Pakistan (163 million bushels, 3 percent). Lower production was reported in Argentina (-73 million bushels) and the U.S. (-38 million bushels). Production is a function of harvested acres and yields. In the 10-year period between 2007 and 2017 (using five-year averages), world wheat harvested acres increased from 529 million acres to 547 million acres (an 18 million acre increase). Increased harvested acres were reported for the FSU-12 (10.9 million acres), India (10 million acres), and the EU-28 (3.6 million acres). Lower harvested acres were reported for the U.S. (-6 million acres), Argentina (-3.7 million acres), and Australia (-1 million acres). YIELDS UP SUBSTANTIALLY On average, world wheat yields increased from 41.8 bushels per acre to 49.4 bushels. No major wheat producing country reported a decline in yields. Canada reported the highest yield increase, 10.4 bushels per acre, followed by the EU-28, reporting 9.2 bushels, and the FSU-12, with 9.1 bushels. The U.S. reported an increase of 4.9 bushels. Reported yields for the 2017/18 marketing year are 83 bushels per acre for the EU-28, 47 bushels for Argentina, 46 bushels for the U.S., 44 bushels for Canada, 41 bushels for the FSU-12 (the Ukraine-60, Russia-45, and Kasakastan-18), and for Australia, 27 bushels. At the beginning of the 2008/09 wheat marketing year, the world’s five-year average exports were 4.15 billion bushels. At the beginning of the 2017/18 wheat marketing year, the five-year average world exports were 6.35 billion bushels, a 2.2 billion bushel or 53 percent increase. Countries with increased exports were the FSU-12 (Russia 27 million bushels; the Ukraine 477 million bushels, and Kazakhstan 46 million bushels), the EU-28 (732 million bushels), Canada (218 million bushels), and Australia (215 million bushels). Lower exports were reported for the U.S. (-187 million bushels), and Argentina (-61 million bushels). During the last 10 years, world wheat production and exports have shifted to the FSU and EU countries, along with China and India. Improved production practices and technology may have resulted in higher yields and increased harvested acres. The facts indicate that the world wheat market has changed; those changes are probably permanent; and the changes are not favorable for U.S. wheat production or prices. Source: Kim Anderson, Southwest Farm Press
New Tech for In-furrow Application
Herbicide, fungicide and insecticide application is undergoing constant innovation, but one area that's getting more attention is in-furrow at planting. Amvac, the innovator that brought smart-box technology to market, is aiming for a new approach that would allow application a range of products in one pass. The tech is SIMPAS, which is an abbreviation for Smart Integrated Multi-Product Prescription Application System. Think of the system as a kind of heavy-duty cartridge approach to putting down multiple products in a single pass. Each of those "cartridges" is, in fact, a 2.5-gallon, product-filled container. The container itself has as much tech as the material inside, according to Rick Rice, Amvac director, application technology. "The system uses similar software to what inkjet printers use," Rice explains. And right now the machine works with granular products, though Rice tells Farm Progress that work is well underway to bring liquid application to the product, too. "Our vision is for a farmer to apply a combination of dry and/or liquid product across a broad portfolio of materials, including micronutrients, nematicides, fungicides and insecticides," Rice says. Each of those jug-type cartridges in SIMPAS has a radio frequency identification tag, or RFID, unit that connects with the application system to track how much product is in the jug and how much is applied. When in use, the jug essentially "talks" to the application unit reporting product used. When a farmer finishes, the RFID tag has measured not only what's applied, but also what's left in the jug. For your dealer, that brings new opportunities. Say you apply your last field with an insecticide, a fungicide and a nematicide. The set of three jugs per row unit can be returned to the dealer. "This is a closed system, so the dealer can redeploy those jugs," Rice says. "And we're working on a refill system for dealers to use to fill those jugs." Rice noted that the smart-box system requires dealers to ship those units back to a central location for refilling. SIMPAS could eliminate that step, which could be a benefit for dealers. "Today, with the smart-box system, those boxes have to be empty when they're returned to the dealer," Rice says. "With SIMPAS, that requirement is gone." Prototype and the future Rice explains that the system is still under development. Trimble has signed an agreement to be the sole global marketer of SIMPAS when it is available for farmers. Under the agreement, the Trimble Vantage distribution network will facilitate easy installation and servicing of the SIMPAS technology in North America and other global markets. As for real-world use, the tech is now limited to three of those RFID "cartridges" per planter row. "We do have some weight limits to this system, at this time," Rice says. "There's only so much weight you can put on individual planter row units." The cartridge size will be the next formulation challenge for Amvac and others that want to apply through the system. Formulations that are highly concentrated will do best to allow the planter to run in the field longer. The computer graphic with this story shows an early design iteration of the system, but in the end, those jugs may look more like those 2.5-gallon jugs familiar to many dealers and farmers. That remains to be seen. "The greatest value of the SIMPAS platform is that it will be easy for farmers to prescriptively apply during the planter pass," he says. The ability to swap in different products quickly during planting will also help with planter tending speed and productivity. For more information, visit american-vanguard.com. Source: Willie Vogt, Western Farmer-Stockman
How to Estimate Nitrogen Loss from Leaching
The nitrogen cycle dictates the form and movement of nitrogen in the soil and in plants. Given adequate time and temperature, nitrogen in the soil will convert to the nitrate form, which is susceptible to loss in two pathways: denitrification, which happens in saturated soils that lack oxygen, and leaching, which happens when water moves through the soil, taking nitrate with it. Think of the soil and the different forms of nitrogen as the charged ends of a magnet. The nitrate form of nitrogen is negatively charged, so it is not attracted to the negatively charged clay particles in the soil. This means it does not adsorb to clay particles, leaving it “loose” in the soil and subject to move with water. Though we can’t determine the exact extent of nitrate movement through leaching, we can estimate it. Six Inches Movement per Inch of Water Drained Research measuring drainage water at the Southern Research and Outreach Center in Waseca and elsewhere shows that nitrate will move about six inches for every inch of water drained. We have also seen nitrate move as much as twelve inches in coarse textured soils for every inch of water drained. Factors like compaction and underperforming drainage systems can slow movement down, while water flow through macropores (root channels, worm holes, cracks, etc.) can speed movement. These factors vary widely across different landscapes, which is why we can only estimate the extent of leaching. In general, if you know a field is close to saturation, or at “field capacity,” you can assume more water will either run off or drain. At this point, you can estimate that an extra inch of rain percolating through the soil will likely move nitrate down six inches in the soil profile. Estimating based on drainage system You can also estimate based on your drainage system. If a system is designed with a half-inch drainage coefficient (commonly found in South Central Minnesota), it means a half inch of water will move in a 24-hour period when the system is flowing at capacity. Of course, systems do not flow at full capacity very often, so estimate based on the approximate percentage of capacity and how long water is flowing. Assuming field tile is 3.5 feet deep and you applied N at six inches deep, nitrate needs to move three feet before it is completely lost. This requires 6 inches of drainage, which is a very large amount, but not unheard of in extreme years. Looking at it another way, field tile would have to flow at full capacity for 12 days to achieve this. Most artificial drainage systems only flow at full capacity for a day or two each year. Remember that downward movement of nitrate does not necessarily mean nitrate loss until it has moved below the rooting depth of corn. Keep this in mind if you plan to take soil samples to determine nitrogen availability. If you only sample one foot deep, but nitrate has moved to between one and two feet, it is still there and available for your crop, but will not show up on the soil test. Account for this difference to avoid over-fertilization, loss to the environment and unnecessary expenses. Source: Nora nolden, University of Minnesota Extension
Yesterday?s price action was neutral but futures overnight were ...
Yesterday?s price action was neutral but futures overnight were supported with continued talk of strong bean demand. Chinese soybean, meal, and corn values have been higher this week supporting the demand outlook here in the US. The US Dollar is also lower this morning helping support CME grains. Continued dryness in Australia has traders continuing to lower wheat production estimates. On the open at 8:30 a.m., corn trading 2 cents higher, soybeans up a dime, KC wheat a penny higher.>
Farm safety -- a necessary priority with harvest here
With harvest just around the corner, it is the perfect time of year to spark a conversation about farm safety. That is exactly what Risto Rautiainen, professor of environmental, agricultural and occupational heath at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, hoped to do at the 40th annual Husker Harvest Days last week in Grand Island. Read more in this week's print or e-editions. ? Rate this article:  Select ratingGive Farm safety -- a necessary priority with harvest here 1/5Give Farm safety -- a necessary priority with harvest here 2/5Give Farm safety -- a necessary priority with harvest here 3/5Give Farm safety -- a necessary priority with harvest here 4/5Give Farm safety -- a necessary priority with harvest here 5/5 Average: 5 (1 vote)
EPA to Allow Use of Dicamba, Tighten Restrictions
The Environmental Protection Agency is aiming to allow farmers to spray the controversial weedkiller dicamba next year, but with additional rules for its use, an official with the agency said on Tuesday. Reuben Baris, acting chief of the herbicide branch of the EPA Office of Pesticide Programs, said the agency had not determined what steps it would take to mitigate problems associated with dicamba. The herbicide, which fights weeds resistant to another herbicide called glyphosate, was linked to widespread crop damage this summer. The EPA has been discussing with state regulators ways to prevent such crop damage. Use of dicamba, which is produced by BASF SE and Monsanto Co., spiked after U.S. regulators last year approved a new formulation that allowed farmers to apply it to soybean plants that were engineered to resist the chemical while it killed weeds. Previously it had been sprayed on fields prior to planting. Farmers say the chemical caused damage by drifting away from where it was sprayed to fields of soybeans and other plants that could not tolerate it. Baris told a meeting of state regulatory officials in Washington, D.C., that the agency was "very concerned with what has occurred and transpired in 2017." "We're committed to taking appropriate action for the 2018 growing season with an eye toward ensuring that the technology is available, number one, to growers but that it is used responsibly," he said. The EPA is in negotiations with Monsanto and BASF, which sell dicamba herbicides under different brands, to make changes regarding how they are used, Baris said. State regulators previously told Reuters the EPA was considering establishing a set date after which the spraying of dicamba weed killers on growing crops would not be allowed. Arkansas is independently weighing an April 15, 2018, deadline. But Tony Cofer of the Alabama Department of Agriculture said such a cutoff date would not match Baris' goal of maintaining dicamba's usefulness. "That type of restriction would not be something they're probably considering, in all practicality, if they wanted to continue use of the product," said Cofer, director of the state's Pesticide Management Division . Monsanto has said the April 15, 2018, date would amount to a ban in Arkansas because the chemical was designed to be sprayed over the genetically engineered crops during the summer growing season. Arkansas previously blocked sales of Monsanto's dicamba herbicide in the state. Source: AgriMarketing
Illinois Corn and Soybean Harvest Considerations
The USDA’s September predictions for Illinois corn and soybean yield are 189 and 58 bushels per acre, respectively. According to University of Illinois agronomist Emerson Nafziger, these are good yields after the challenges of the 2017 season. As we head into harvest, Nafziger provides considerations for farmers looking to minimize last-minute yield losses. Soybeans “While we don’t expect as many yields in the 80-90 bushel range as we had in 2016, pod numbers in many fields are higher than expected after the dry weather in August and September,” Nafziger says. One reason is the cooler temperatures in recent weeks; with water use lower under cooler temperatures, plants avoided the premature leaf drop that sometimes signals an early end to seed filling. Rain might help boost yields a bit, but only in fields planted late or with late-maturing varieties where plants are still green. With high temperatures predicted for the rest of the week, seeds and pods of maturing soybeans will dry within hours, rather than days. “We need to be alert and ready to harvest as soon as plants can be cut and seed moisture drops to 13 percent,” Nafziger says. “If moisture drops to 10 percent or less during harvest, it might be worth stopping until pods and seeds take on some moisture in the evening or overnight.” Breeding and the use of improved combine headers have reduced pod shatter at harvest, but soybean seeds with less than 10 percent moisture can crack, lowering grain and seed quality. “Harvest is getting underway at about the same time for both corn and soybean this year, but there might need to be frequent switching between the two crops as harvest progresses in order to maximize quality and minimize losses,” Nafziger says. Corn Nafziger notes that the corn crop in many fields is looking better than expected. As of Sept. 17, five percent of the state’s corn crop had been harvested, mostly in the southern half of the state. So far, reported yields have been highly variable, reflecting differences in planting (or replanting) time, soil water-holding capacity, and precipitation during critical times throughout the season. When lack of water lowers photosynthetic rates, sugars are pulled out of the stalk into the ear to fill the grain, leaving stalks more susceptible to stalk-rotting fungi and lodging. Nafziger recommends that farmers should check fields for stalk strength, especially where leaves dried earlier than expected. However, good growing conditions in July likely increased the deposition of stalk-strengthening lignin, making stalks less likely to break. “As long as winds stay relatively calm, lodging is not expected to be much of a threat, especially in those parts of the state that received more rainfall in July and August,” he says. Most of central and northern Illinois are approximately 150 growing degree days (GDD) behind normal since May 1. According to Nafziger, below-normal temperatures in recent weeks have slowed grain-filling rates and delayed maturity of the corn crop. But the cooler temperatures probably have been positive for yields by extending the water supply into mid-September. “With GDD accumulation rates above normal now, a lot of fields will reach physiological maturity quickly, and grain will start to dry down. High temperatures mean rapid grain moisture loss. We’ve seen corn grain lose moisture as much as one percentage point of moisture per day under high temperatures, especially if it's breezy,” he says. Dry conditions over the past month have limited the spread of ear rots. “Most kernels have the bright yellow color of healthy grain, and if the grain can be harvested without an extended period of wet weather, we expect grain quality to be good. Harvesting at high moisture, drying at high temperatures, or storing grain without proper care can all compromise quality, however,” Nafziger says. “While we like to finish harvest early, the threat of loss in yield or quality from delaying harvest to October is low. But waiting too long isn’t good, either; delaying harvest until grain moisture drops below 16 or 17 percent can increase loss due to shelling of kernels onto the ground as ears go into the combine.” Nafziger notes that test weight is an issue that comes up every year during corn harvest. He says test weights lower than the standard of 56 pounds per bushel have many people thinking that something went wrong during grain fill. Likewise, above-normal test weights are often taken as a sign that kernels filled extraordinarily well, and that yield was maximized. “Neither of these is very accurate – high yields often have test weights less than 56 pounds, and grain from lower-yielding fields can have high test weights,” he says. Test weight is bulk density – it measures the weight of grain in 1.24 cubic feet, which is the volume of a bushel. Kernel density is the weight of a kernel divided by its volume, not including air the way bulk density does. Kernel density is a more useful measure of kernel soundness and quality than is test weight – it’s often used by the food corn processing industry – but it is harder to measure than test weight. “A typical kernel density might be 90 pounds per ‘bushel’ (1.24 cubic feet) of actual kernel volume,” Nafziger explains. “So, a 56-pound bushel of corn grain is about 62 percent kernel weight and 38 percent air. Kernels with higher density tend to produce higher test weights, but only if they fit together without a lot of air space. For example, popcorn has small, high-density kernels that fit together well, and its test weight is typically 65 pounds per bushel.” Hybrid genetics, growing conditions, and grain moisture at the time it is weighed can all affect test weight. If kernels appear to be well-filled without a shrunken base, which can signal that grain fill ended prematurely, it’s likely that yield was not compromised even if test weight is less than 56 pounds per bushel. “For reasons that go back to an earlier time, though, corn test weight needs to be at least 54 pounds per bushel in order to be sold as U.S. No. 2 corn, which is the most common market class. Corn with a test weight of 52 or 53 might not be docked in price if it can be blended with higher test weight grain to reach the minimum. That’s much easier to do in a year when test weights are generally good. We expect 2017 to be such a year,” Nafziger says. For more on the 2017 harvest, read Nafziger’s recent post on The Bulletin. Source: University of Illinois Extension
Sugarcane Aphids Not a Major Problem for Prepared Texas Sorghum Producers
Most sorghum producers around the state experienced lower sugarcane aphid populations than the previous two years, with some help from nature, growing conditions, technology and adequate preparation, according to Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service experts. Danielle Sekula, AgriLife Extension integrated pest management entomologist, Weslaco, said damages the previous two growing seasons had South Texas sorghum producers on guard and prepared for the pest that migrates from Mexico in the spring. Sugarcane aphids inflicted heavy damage to Texas sorghum fields in 2014 and 2015. AgriLife Extension economists compiled data earlier this year that indicated farmers incurred $21.87 million in losses for 2014 and $17.53 million in 2015 due to sugarcane aphids. “Producers were ready and waiting this year,” she said. “They knew sugarcane aphids were coming, and they had their products ready and were prepared to spray. I had some producers who sprayed as soon as they saw the winged aphids migrating into their fields and laying live young, and others who sprayed as soon as they saw a nice size population of aphids on their plants. I hardly got any phone calls compared to previous years.” Sekula said early spring conditions also allowed producers to harvest sorghum fields earlier, before sugarcane aphid populations reached a second peak around the second week in June. “Harvest was early this year because we really didn’t have a winter,” she said. “Producers were harvesting in mid-May to the first week in June before aphid numbers became a real problem. The crop was early, it matured quickly and producers got it out of their fields before there were major issues.” Predators numbers also helped keep aphid numbers in check, she said. Ladybugs were in typical good numbers but lacewings, another aphid predator, were seen in larger numbers than previous years. Two different species of parasitoids also showed up in good numbers to impact sugarcane aphid populations in South Texas. Sugarcane aphids “annihilated” several haygrazer fields in July, Sekula said. But early and effective treatments by sorghum producers along the Texas-Mexico border likely contributed to lower migratory numbers for inland producers to deal with. “We scouted along the river early, and a lot of producers sprayed at the first signs of sugarcane aphids,” she said. “It created a border that I think prevented aphids from going north in as heavy numbers as they had in previous years.” Dr. Ed Bynum, AgriLife Extension entomologist, Amarillo, said he didn’t see infestations until the middle part of August, and sugarcane aphid numbers didn’t begin building until a week or two after their arrival. It was late August before the pests made their way to sorghum fields along the northern Texas-Oklahoma Panhandle border. “Some areas had significant build up so there were treatments, but some areas across the Panhandle were sporadic, and we didn’t see them build up to dangerous levels,” he said. “Last year and the year before infestations were a lot heavier, especially in the southern parts of the Panhandle, and more fields were treated.” Bynum attributed lower sugarcane aphid populations to fewer acres of planted sorghum, producers planting aphid-tolerant sorghum varieties and monitoring fields closely, and lower pest migration numbers. “Sorghum acreage was down across the High Plains, and that contributed to the lower numbers early on,” he said. “Producers were definitely out watching for them because they understand the damage that can be done. They also planted varieties with certain levels of tolerance that didn’t allow the numbers to build up so quickly. I think variety choices and early scouting by producers and late aphid arrival this season was the main thing for lower aphid pressure in the Texas Panhandle.” Sekula said some producers did choose more tolerant varieties but many stuck with the higher-yield varieties they were familiar with. “They were looking for higher yields and knew what they needed to do to protect them, and I think they did pretty well,” she said. AgriLife Extension district summaries can be found here. Source: Texas AgriLife Extension
Fall Noxious Weed Control
This fall most areas are good for fall weed control, but there will also be some areas that it may not be the best. Fall weed control can give the best weed control but it also can be a poor time. If the noxious weeds were sprayed or clipped earlier this summer and there is good weed growth now, this would be a good time to spray these weeds and get a good kill. However, if the weeds were not controlled early and now are tall, very mature and do not have a lot of regrowth you may not even want to make an effort because it will not do any good. The questionable area is where the weeds were maybe clipped earlier and there is regrowth or the regrowth is starting to dry up because of the dry conditions and is not growing well. These areas then become questionable to spray. If you want to spray these areas make sure that you use a spray that has residual effect so when the plant starts growing again after a rain, it will be killed then. Lastly, even though we have not had a freeze we are in September and the perennials have started to prepare for winter by sending nutrients down to the roots to help the plant make it through the cold winter months. If you have fall spraying for leafy spurge, Canada thistle, sow thistle, wormwood sage, and musk thistle to do now is the time, not when you get busy with harvest in the next few weeks. Source: Paul Johnson, South Dakota State University Extension
National
Midday cash livestock markets
  Light to moderate cash cattle trade is developing with live prices about $2.00 higher than last week.? While bids are firming up in parts of the North, business has not yet developed given the higher asking prices of $172 to $174.? Look for more trade to develop before mid-afternoon as short-bought packers move to cover immediate needs.? Bids are reported at $108.00 live and $166.00 to $170.00 dressed. Boxed beef cutout is firm at the midday with light to moderate box movement.? Continue reading Midday cash livestock markets at Brownfield Ag News.      
Arkansas Plant Board recommends April 15 dicamba cutoff
The Arkansas State Plant Board has voted unanimously to recommend a ban on spraying dicamba herbicide on cropland between April 16th and October 31st. The proposed ban would prevent in-season use of dicamba on soybeans and cotton. Proponents of the ban say it is necessary to avoid a repeat of dicamba drift-related crop damage reported by hundreds of Arkansas farmers in 2017. Opponents of the ban say it essentially defeats the purpose of the new dicamba herbicides, which were designed to be sprayed over the top of crops throughout the growing season. Continue reading Arkansas Plant Board recommends April 15 dicamba cutoff at Brownfield Ag News.      
Texas farmer finds a niche with organic cotton
More and more farmers are looking to niche markets to diversify their farming operations. Jeremy Brown, who farms in west Texas near the small?town of South Plains, added organic cotton to his farming operation back in 2010.? He says it was strictly a business decision. “It was an opportunity for me to get a little bit more price for my product,” Brown?tells Brownfield.?“As a business owner, it’s no different than Nike and those other companies and what they’re trying to do.” We spoke with Brown at a recent USFRA Food Dialogues event in Lincoln, Nebraska.? Continue reading Texas farmer finds a niche with organic cotton at Brownfield Ag News.      
Invasive worm worries Wisconsin researchers, DNR
Wisconsin researchers and conservation officials are concerned about an invasive earthworm species.? University of Wisconsin Ecologist Carly Ziter says crazy worms, also called Alabama Jumpers, break down plant material and nutrients faster than regular worms or other soil organisms releasing too many nutrients at once. ?“One of the worries about this is that when you release so many nutrients so quickly, they could be lost. ?So, we know that these earthworms can raise for example the amounts of nitrogen and phosphorus in our soils, and it might leave them vulnerable?to leaching or to getting into our water system.” Ziter says the worms work so fast, it?s like having a fast-acting fertilizer on soil, but they also change the soil texture. ? Continue reading Invasive worm worries Wisconsin researchers, DNR at Brownfield Ag News.      
Wisconsin soybeans a week away from harvest
A University of Wisconsin soybean expert says most of the state?s soybeans are almost ready for harvest. ?Associate Professor and researcher Shawn Conley tells Brownfield, “Probably that last week of September, farmers will really begin to roll. Every farmer I’ve spoken with thinks their first beans will be ready in about a week.” ?Conley says?the test plots look good and yields should be pretty good. ?“We have taken out some early maturity group soybeans and those yields have been pretty strong, so I think there’s good yield potential out there if two things happened: If growers got it planted on time and they avoided white mold.” Conley says many producers planted late because of the wet spring, but he?s getting questions about last week?s helpful heat wave and the possibility of frost soon. ? Continue reading Wisconsin soybeans a week away from harvest at Brownfield Ag News.      
Farmer says crops look better than they should
An Ohio farmer says after the challenging growing season his crops look better than they should. Paul Herringshaw grows corn, soybeans, and soft red winter wheat in northern Ohio about an hour from Lake Erie. He tells Brownfield the farm had five inches of rain in five days after wheat harvest. “I think it was surprising to a lot of wheat growers how good their wheat yield was this year. Continue reading Farmer says crops look better than they should at Brownfield Ag News.      
Arkansas farmers sign petition opposing dicamba cut-off
More than 300 Arkansas farmers have signed a petition in opposition to a proposed April 15th cutoff date for dicamba application next year in Arkansas. Attorney Grant Ballard with ArkAg LLC?represents some of those growers and tells Brownfield Ag News, ?I think that my clients and a lot of producers in Arkansas are a little bit skeptical of the rush to judgment on the dicamba herbicide issue.? Ballard says his clients have also submitted an open letter to the Arkansas Plant Board, ?Which has some suggestions for potential ways that dicamba use could be regulated to avoid unintended injury while still allowing producers to use dicamba herbicides in certain instances.? The recommendation of the Arkansas Dicamba Task Force for that cut-off date ? Ballard says, is not totally representative of growers who are benefitting from the weed-control technology and need to use it next year. Continue reading Arkansas farmers sign petition opposing dicamba cut-off at Brownfield Ag News.      
CREAATE Act would support foreign ag trade programs
The American Soybean Association (ASA) strongly supports legislation that would double funding for two programs they say help make U.S. ag products priorities to other countries. John Heisdorffer, an Iowa farmer and ASA vice president, says the CREAATE Act looks to expand the reach of the Market Access (MAP) and Foreign Market Development (FMD) programs. “This was ASA’s idea early on (as) we first started trying to double?it this spring.? Continue reading CREAATE Act would support foreign ag trade programs at Brownfield Ag News.      
Arkansas producers sign petition opposing dicamba cut-off
More than 300 Arkansas farmers have signed a petition in opposition to a proposed April 15th cutoff date for dicamba application next year in Arkansas. Attorney Grant Ballard represents some of those growers, and tells Brownfield Ag News, ?I think that my clients and a lot of producers in Arkansas are a little bit skeptical of the rush to judgment on the dicamba herbicide issue.? Ballard says his clients have also submitted an open letter to the Arkansas Plant Board, ?Which has some suggestions for potential ways that dicamba use could be regulated to avoid unintended injury while still allowing producers to use dicamba herbicides in certain instances.? The recommendation of the Arkansas Dicamba Task Force for that cut-off date ? Ballard says, is not totally representative of growers who are benefitting from the weed-control technology and need to use it next year. Continue reading Arkansas producers sign petition opposing dicamba cut-off at Brownfield Ag News.      
NAFTA third round talks open Saturday
The third round of North American Free Trade Agreement renegotiations begins in Canada in a couple of days.? Talks are to be held in Ottawa this coming Saturday through next Wednesday. The first and second rounds of talks, in Washington, D.C. and Mexico City, are described as largely uneventful with little resolution on major trade issues among NAFTA partners.? The Trump administration hints that a deal may not be reached.? U.S. commodity groups say failure to stay in NAFTA would result in significant negative agriculture trade impacts. Continue reading NAFTA third round talks open Saturday at Brownfield Ag News.      
Cattle futures continue to wait for direction from cash market
At the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, live cattle futures closed mostly lower as it continues to wait for direction from the cash market and in addition to some profit-taking today after Wednesday big move.? October live cattle closed $.85 lower at $110.10 and December live cattle closed $.05 lower at $116.20.? September feeder cattle closed $.80 lower at $153.17 and October feeder cattle closed $1.40 lower at $155.87. Direct cash cattle trade has been untested with both bids and asking prices remaining poorly defined.? Continue reading Cattle futures continue to wait for direction from cash market at Brownfield Ag News.      
Canada?s cattle herd shrinking, hog herd expanding
Canada’s cattle herd could be the smallest in 28 years, but its pork sector is poised to set export records. A report from Agrimoney.com says the USDA?s Ottawa bureau is forecasting a return to expansion in the Canadian cattle herd, but that it?s unlikely before 2019.? The bureau says Canada isn?t retaining sufficient numbers of heifers to fuel herd growth.? Another reason is because of aging producers who aren?t being succeeded by younger farmers. Continue reading Canada’s cattle herd shrinking, hog herd expanding at Brownfield Ag News.      
Minnesota soybean yields expected down vs 2016
An agronomist in southwest Minnesota expects soybean yields to be lower than a year ago. Harmon Wilts with Dekalb/Asgrow says while some fields look extremely good, there?s a lot more variability compared to 2016. “The biggest variable you’re going to find is the soybean seed size.? If you look at this year, June was cool, but August we had a lot of rain.? And our soybeans in general are a little bit shorter than they normally would be.? Continue reading Minnesota soybean yields expected down vs 2016 at Brownfield Ag News.      
Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: September 21, 2017
Dec. corn closed at $3.50 and 1/4,?up 1/4 cent Nov. soybeans closed at $9.70 and 3/4,?up?3/4?cent Oct. soybean meal closed at $309.00,?up?$2.70 Oct. soybean oil closed at 34.10,?down 57?points Dec. wheat closed at $4.52 and 1/2,?up?2 and 3/4?cents Oct. live cattle closed at $110.10,?down 85 cents Oct. lean hogs closed at $57.32,?down $1.32 Nov. Continue reading Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: September 21, 2017 at Brownfield Ag News.      
Michigan apple growers find labor through H2A
More Michigan apple growers are turning to the H2A program to secure harvest labor. Michigan State University Extension fruit educator Mark Longstroth says putting together large hand-harvest crews is increasingly challenging. “So more and more apple growers have gone to the H2A program, where they contract for foreign labor to come in for a set amount of time.? And they are guaranteed a wage, job and lodging.? And the group comes in and picks.” He tells Brownfield the temporary ag worker program is especially popular with larger orchards. Continue reading Michigan apple growers find labor through H2A at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
FMC Corp. Receives Clearances to Acquire DuPont Crop Protection Assets
FMC Corp. has received approval from the Competition Commission of India (CCI) for the proposed acquisition of a significant portion of DuPont’s Crop Protection business. The CCI is the final jurisdiction to grant antitrust clearance needed to satisfy regulatory conditions for closing. “FMC is pleased to have received CCI’s approval,” said Pierre Brondeau, FMC president, CEO and chairman. “We are on track to close our transactions with DuPont on November 1, 2017.” FMC announced on March 31, 2017 the signing of a definitive agreement for FMC to acquire a portion of DuPont’s Crop Protection business that it must divest to comply with the European Commission ruling related to its merger with The Dow Chemical Company. FMC will acquire DuPont’s global chewing pest insecticide portfolio, its global cereal broadleaf herbicides, and substantially all of DuPont’s global crop protection R&D capabilities. Additionally, DuPont will acquire FMC’s Health and Nutrition segment and receive $1.2 billion in cash.
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Pumpkin Spice Addiction
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Univar Acquires Tagma Brasil
Univar Inc. announced that its wholly owned subsidiary Univar Brasil Ltda. has acquired Tagma Brasil Ltda., a leading provider of custom formulation and packaging services for crop protection chemicals. “Brazil has agriculture and agro-food exports of more than $89 billion and a domestic market that serves nearly 210 million people. This acquisition expands Univar’s agriculture business in one of the world’s fastest-growing agricultural markets,” said Steve Newlin, Univar’s chairman and chief executive officer. “In addition, Tagma’s formulation and packaging capabilities will enhance the value proposition for several of our key global supplier partners, and Tagma’s strong culture of safety, integrity and quality will be an excellent complement to Univar’s already robust agricultural business in North America.” In Brazil, Tagma is a leading provider of custom formulation and packaging services for crop protection chemicals that include herbicides, insecticides, fungicides and surfactants. Tagma formulates more than 200 registered crop protection products and provides conception and preparation of new formulations; adaption of existing formulations; and technical assistance with processing and regulatory requirements. “Joining Univar positions us well to be a more valuable, more relevant partner to existing and future global customers who are looking for supply chain solutions, and I am confident this will create opportunities and growth for our current employees,” stated Jos? Carlos Leite, president of Tagma. “Tagma allows us to more holistically serve customers in an agriculture market that is increasingly turning toward crop yield protection and biological add-ons,” added Mike Hildebrand, Univar’s president of Canada, Agriculture and Environmental Sciences. “We welcome this opportunity to expand Univar Brasil’s formulation and packaging capacity, which will allow us to serve our customers with increased capabilities and provide our suppliers with expanded market reach.”
Arkansas Plant Board Backs 2018 Regulatory Changes for Dicamba
The Arkansas State Plant Board voted to approve regulatory changes for the application of products labeled for agricultural use that contain dicamba in Arkansas. The regulatory changes will prohibit the use in Arkansas between Apr. 16 ? Oct. 31. The regulations include exemptions for the use of dicamba in pastures, rangeland, turf, ornamental, direct injection for forestry, and home use.? The approved regulations are closely aligned with the recommendations from the Dicamba Task Force and the Plant Board?s Pesticide Committee. The Board?s regulatory changes concerning the use of dicamba will now be subject to a 30-day public comment period which will be followed by a public hearing that will be held on Nov. 8.? Following the public comment and public hearing period, the final proposed rule will be forwarded to the Executive Subcommittee of the Arkansas Legislative Council for final rule approval. The board also voted to approve a new regulation that establishes notice procedures for requesting additional research and for restricting products beyond EPA approval. This regulatory change will also be subject to a 30-day public comment period which will be followed by a public hearing to be held in conjunction with the Board?s next quarterly meeting on Dec. 12. Following the public hearing the final proposed rule will be forwarded to the Executive Subcommittee of the Arkansas Legislative Council for final rule approval. The State Plant Board also held a public hearing to consider changes to Pesticide Enforcement Response Regulations in accordance with Act 778 of 2017 that increased the maximum civil penalty from $1,000 to $25,000 for egregious violations from applications of dicamba or an Auxin containing herbicide, or any new herbicide technology released after Aug. 1, 2017. No public comments were received and the regulation will now be sent to the Executive Subcommittee of the Arkansas Legislative Council for final rule approval. Other business before the Board included a review of the petition for rulemaking recently filed by Monsanto. The State Plant Board denied the petition by unanimous vote and will work with legal staff to prepare a response. The proposed regulations and other dicamba information and updates can be found at: http://www.aad.arkansas.gov/arkansas-dicamba-information-updates. The Arkansas Agriculture Department is dedicated to the development and implementation of policies and programs for Arkansas agriculture and forestry to keep its farmers and ranchers competitive in national and international markets while ensuring safe food, fiber, and forest products for the citizens of the state and nation. Learn more at aad.arkansas.gov.  
Morning Market Audio 9/22/17
Mike Hoffman's Forecast for September 22
Mike Hoffman's AgDay forecast
A Third of Rural Hospitals in Danger of Closing
Since 2010, eighty-two rural hospitals have closed. An additional 673 rural hospitals, a third of the total facilities serving rural communities, are in imminent danger of closing according to a study by the National Rural Health Association. 
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Random Harvest TIps and Tricks
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What is the Best Chance fora Corn Rally?
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Tornado Hits Oregon Dairy, Totaling Two Barns
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Grower-Led Group Launches, Highlights GMO Benefits
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