CORN  
Delivery Date Cash Price Basis Futures Change Futures Price
History May17 3.32 05/30/2017 5:43:00 AM CST -0.39
 -3'4
370'6
History Jun17 3.34 05/30/2017 5:43:00 AM CST -0.37
 -3'4
370'6
History Jul17 3.35 05/30/2017 5:43:00 AM CST -0.36
 -3'4
370'6
History Aug17 3.41 05/30/2017 5:21:00 AM CST -0.38
 -3'2
378'4
History Sep17 3.41 05/30/2017 5:21:00 AM CST -0.38
 -3'2
378'4
History Oct17 3.49 05/30/2017 5:35:00 AM CST -0.40
 -3'4
389'0
History Nov17 3.49 05/30/2017 5:35:00 AM CST -0.40
 -3'4
389'0
 
SOYBEANS  
Delivery Date Cash Price Basis Futures Change Futures Price
History May17 8.40 05/30/2017 5:43:00 AM CST -0.85
 -2'0
924'4
History Jun17 8.42 05/30/2017 5:43:00 AM CST -0.83
 -2'0
924'4
History Jul17 8.44 05/30/2017 5:43:00 AM CST -0.81
 -2'0
924'4
History Oct17 8.33 05/30/2017 5:31:00 AM CST -0.95
 -1'2
928'0
National
Larger feedlot supply will be on the fed market later this year
The USDA’s latest cattle on feed report shows a lot of cattle were placed into feedlots. ?There were good reasons for placements to be big in April,? said David Anderson, agriculture economist at Texas A&M University, in an interview with Brownfield commodity reporter John Perkins.? Higher cash cattle bids and vigorous beef demand played roles.? The two percent bump in numbers of cattle on feed implies growing cattle supplies, with more cows and more calves that are now showing up in feedlots, according to Anderson.? Continue reading Larger feedlot supply will be on the fed market later this year at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
Attention Turns to Crop Ratings
Grain markets are lower as traders return from the long holiday weekend. Outside markets have a heavy data week in front of them, beginning today with Personal Spending.
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Today and everyday, thank you. We honor and remember all our veterans ...
Today and everyday, thank you. We honor and remember all our veterans and soldiers for giving the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom.>
What better way to kick off the Memorial Day weekend than announcing ...
What better way to kick off the Memorial Day weekend than announcing our LAST Planting Picture Giveaway winner! Congratulations Ashley Dornhoff! Great photo! A huge thank you to everyone who shared their photos with us! #plant17>
We are going to be rolling out an amazing Summer of Ethanol Giveaway ...
We are going to be rolling out an amazing Summer of Ethanol Giveaway in June that you will NOT want to miss out on! In order to participate you will need an Aurora Cooperative gas card so be sure to get yours soon! More details to come so keep following us #YourCornYourEthanol
Be sure to call your Grain Merchandiser today to learn more about our ...
Be sure to call your Grain Merchandiser today to learn more about our High of the Day Contract. The enrollment period ends on June 1st! Click here to contact your local merchandiser: http://auroracoop.com/img/pdf/High%20of%20the%20Day%20Contract3.pdf>
Agronomist Gabe Bathen from our York location stopped by this field ...
Agronomist Gabe Bathen from our York location stopped by this field receiving aerial application to discuss some of its benefits when there is moisture in the field. #YourYieldTour #YourYieldsYourFields #YourYieldMatters>
The sun is out! It's going to be a great day! Photo credit to Josh ...
The sun is out! It's going to be a great day! Photo credit to Josh Dexter, agronomist in Wood River>
Congratulations to May's winner Tim Mann of Aurora! Tim was nominated ...
Congratulations to May's winner Tim Mann of Aurora! Tim was nominated for not only going above and beyond every time he is at work but also for his dedication to his community and neighborhood. Congrats Tim! Also don't forget to leave some feedback below about the new idea of starting a special drawing to recognize our owners and all they do in their communities!>
Dave Harrington, one of our Animal Nutrition specialist, explains ...
Dave Harrington, one of our Animal Nutrition specialist, explains ways to improve cow/calf health when making the transition from the yard to the pasture for summer grazing. Watch this video with NCN to learn more!>
We appreciate Senator Fischer's continued work on behalf of ...
We appreciate Senator Fischer's continued work on behalf of Nebraska's farmers and ranchers!>
We had a great time today showing the North American Livestock Show & ...
We had a great time today showing the North American Livestock Show & Rodeo Managers Association around our corporate office in Aurora and explaining to them how a cooperative works!>
Today's Your Yield Tour video is brought to you by Derek Bailey, an ...
Today's Your Yield Tour video is brought to you by Derek Bailey, an agronomist from Harvard, warning growers to watch for pythium in their soybeans after the recent moist events.>
Your Corn, Your Ethanol delivered straight to Your Farm. ...
Your Corn, Your Ethanol delivered straight to Your Farm. #YourCornYourEthanol>
We know emergence is important to overall yield potential. On the ...
We know emergence is important to overall yield potential. On the top, soybeans emerged using Aurora Bean Starter. Soybeans in the bottom picture didn't have Aurora Bean Starter. #EmergeTogetherWinTogether>
The USDA Crop Progress Report for the week ending May 21 Corn ...
The USDA Crop Progress Report for the week ending May 21 Corn Planted: Nebraska -- 87% under the average 91% Kansas -- 70% under the average 86% Colorado -- 69% under the average 78% Iowa -- 92% over the average 90% South Dakota -- 88% over the average 84% Texas -- 87% over the average 86% Soybeans Planted: Nebraska -- 52% under the average 61% Kansas -- 27% under the average 34% Iowa -- 62% over the average 60% South Dakota -- 56% over the average 50%>
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Today and everyday, thank you. We honor and remember all our veterans ...
Today and everyday, thank you. We honor and remember all our veterans and soldiers for giving the ultimate sacrifice for our freedom.>
What better way to kick off the Memorial Day weekend than announcing ...
What better way to kick off the Memorial Day weekend than announcing our LAST Planting Picture Giveaway winner! Congratulations Ashley Dornhoff! Great photo! A huge thank you to everyone who shared their photos with us! #plant17>
We are going to be rolling out an amazing Summer of Ethanol Giveaway ...
We are going to be rolling out an amazing Summer of Ethanol Giveaway in June that you will NOT want to miss out on! In order to participate you will need an Aurora Cooperative gas card so be sure to get yours soon! More details to come so keep following us #YourCornYourEthanol
Needed Rains Hit Southeast, Florida Still Dry
Summary Soaking precipitation occurred from central portions of the Rockies and Plains into the upper Midwest, mainly from May 16-18, and in parts of the Southeast starting on May 20. Drought-affected areas of the Southeast, including portions of Alabama and Georgia, experienced substantial relief, with rain still falling when the drought-monitoring period ended on May 23. The drought-easing effects of any rain that fell after 8 am EDT on Tuesday, May 23, will be reflected on next week’s map. Farther west, late-season snow (locally 1 to 3 feet) blanketed the northern and central Rockies, while streaks of heavy rain largely arrested drought development in the south-central U.S. Areas that remained stubbornly dry included parts of the north-central U.S. and Florida’s peninsula, although significant rainfall developed in the latter region after the monitoring period ended on May 23. Southeast Starting on May 20, periods of torrential rainfall struck many areas of the Southeast. On May 20 in Alabama, for example, daily-record totals reached 8.15 inches in Montgomery; 4.37 inches in Mobile; and 2.65 inches in Birmingham. For Montgomery, it was the wettest May day on record (previously, 5.23 inches on May 9, 1978), and the wettest day during any time of year since September 26, 1953—when 8.72 inches fell. Due to the extreme nature of some of the recent Southeastern rains, drought improvements of one to locally two categories were noted. In Montgomery County, Alabama, which includes Montgomery, all dryness and drought was removed; last week’s depiction had included a mix of abnormal dryness (D0) and moderate drought (D1). Similar improvements were introduced in other Southeastern areas where heavy rain fell. After the monitoring period ended, substantial rain developed across Florida’s peninsula and also spread across other parts of the Southeast. The rain that fell after 8 am EDT on May 23 will be reflected on next week’s map. By the monitoring cutoff, however, conditions remained dire across Florida’s peninsula due to a combination of heat and drought. Tampa, Florida, achieved high temperatures of 98°F on May 17 and 19, tying a monthly record originally set on May 26, 1975. Tampa narrowly missed its all-time record of 99°F, set on June 5, 1985. The Southwest Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) voted on May 23 to increase water restrictions in its 16-county jurisdiction, after reporting an 11-inch rainfall deficit since the start of the dry season last October. This represents the district’s driest dry season, with records dating back more than a century. Among the new SFWMD restrictions is a once-per-week limit on lawn watering, with that mandate in effect through August 1, 2017. Through May 23, year-to-date rainfall totals in Florida included 4.62 inches (35% of normal) in Orlando; 5.07 inches (47%) in Naples; 5.57 inches (52%) in Fort Myers; and 5.86 inches (51%) in Tampa. On May 21, Florida continued to lead the nation in topsoil moisture rated very short to short (78%) and pastures rated very poor to poor (60%). Midwest The Midwest remained drought free, although a new area of abnormal dryness (D0) was introduced in northern Minnesota. Through May 23, month-to-date rainfall in International Falls, Minnesota, totaled just 0.78 inch (39% of normal). Most other areas of the Midwest have endured an extended period of cool, cloudy, rainy weather, leading to agricultural fieldwork delays and leaving topsoil moisture rated one-third to one-half surplus on May 21, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, in Indiana (46% surplus), Wisconsin (44%), Illinois (35%), and Iowa (35%). High Plains A stripe of heavy precipitation from the central Rockies into the upper Midwest erased pockets of abnormal dryness (D0) in Nebraska and reduced coverage of dryness and moderate drought (D0 and D1) in Colorado. Rain also trimmed D0 coverage in the eastern Dakotas. However, precipitation mostly bypassed the remainder of the Dakotas, leading to further expansion of D0. In addition a new area of moderate drought (D1) was introduced in the vicinity of the Missouri River. On May 21, South Dakota led the entire northern U.S. in topsoil moisture rated very short to short (29%), as well as rangeland and pastures rated very poor to poor (19%), according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. South Just as dryness (D0) and moderate to severe drought (D1 to D2) was ramping up across the south-central U.S., heavy rain struck many areas. In particular, streaks of heavy rain across Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, and Arkansas led to significant reductions in the coverage of dryness and drought. Some of the heaviest rain, locally 4 to 8 inches or more, fell from north-central Texas into east-central and northeastern Oklahoma. Still, the rain largely bypassed a few areas, including the lower Rio Grande Valley, leaving the drought designation intact or even leading to local deterioration. In McAllen, Texas, temperatures reached or exceeded 90°F on 27 of 29 days from April 25 – May 23, missing only May 7 and 8. During that 29-day span, McAllen’s rainfall totaled just 0.31 inch. On May 21, the U.S. Department of Agriculture noted that topsoil moisture was 100% very short to short in the lower Rio Grande Valley. Farther east, abundant rain fell in most places, although northern Mississippi was one area being monitored for possible drought expansion. West Concerns in the West remained minimal, with less than 5% of the 11-state area covered by moderate to extreme drought (D1 to D2). Further, storminess across the central Rockies and environs led to further reduction in the coverage of abnormal dryness (D0) and moderate drought (D1), mainly in Colorado. On May 18-19, Cheyenne, Wyoming, was blanketed with 14.3 inches of snow, while snowfall ranged from 1 to 3 feet at several locations in the central Rockies. Farther south, however, warm, dry, windy conditions necessitated an eastward expansion of D0 across southern New Mexico. On May 21, topsoil moisture in New Mexico was rated 55% very short to short, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. On the same date, rangeland and pastures were rated 29% very poor to poor in Arizona, up 14 percentage points from a week ago, and 23% very poor to poor in New Mexico. Near Globe, Arizona, the Pinal fire—started by lightning on May 8—has burned more than 3,500 acres of timber and chaparral in rugged terrain. Northeast The Northeast experienced a break from heavy precipitation, resulting in a week of status quo, following recent eradication of all remaining drought. During a brief heat wave, monthly record high temperatures were tied on May 18 in locations such as New York’s LaGuardia Airport (97°F) and Burlington, Vermont (93°F). By May 23, lingering pockets of long-term dryness (D0) were mostly limited to Connecticut, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. New York led the nation on May 21 with topsoil moisture rated 55% surplus, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. On the same date, Northeastern pastures rated good to excellent ranged from 55% in Delaware to 100% in Connecticut. Hawaii, Alaska and Puerto Rico There were no changes to the depictions for Hawaii, Alaska, and Puerto Rico. In Hawaii, locally heavy showers were confined to windward locations. However, leeward Hawaiian areas continued to benefit from heavy rain that fell a few weeks ago. Meanwhile, a warm weather pattern prevailed across Alaska, with temperatures topping the 70-degree mark at some interior locations. Bettles, Alaska, posted a daily-record high of 69°F on May 16, followed by a high of 71°F (not a record) the next day. Alaska’s precipitation was mostly confined to the southern tier of the state, but well south of the existing dry (D0) areas. From May 18-21, rainfall totaled 4.67 inches in Yakutat and 2.97 inches in Juneau. Sitka noted consecutive daily-record totals (1.09 and 1.79 inches, respectively) on May 20-21. Elsewhere, parts of Puerto Rico have begun to trend drier in recent weeks. Although introduction of abnormal dryness (D0) is not yet warranted in Puerto Rico, short-term indicators such as streamflow will need to be carefully monitored if dryness persists. Through May 23, month-to-date rainfall in San Juan, Puerto Rico, has totaled just 1.90 inches (43% of normal). San Juan’s March-April rainfall totaled 12.29 inches (185% of normal). Looking Ahead A storm system in the vicinity of the central Appalachians on Thursday will drift northeastward, reaching coastal New England by May 26. Meanwhile, a low-pressure system will cross southern Canada, with a disturbance along the storm’s trailing cold front affecting the nation’s mid-section during the Memorial Day holiday weekend. On Friday, soaking rains will end across the Northeast, while showers and thunderstorms will develop from the northern Intermountain West into the lower Midwest. Rain will quickly spread eastward and return to parts of the southern and eastern U.S. during the weekend. Elsewhere, mostly dry weather during the next 5 days will be limited to just a few areas, including California and the Southwest. The NWS 6- to 10-day outlook for May 30 – June 3 calls for the likelihood of below-normal temperatures from the central and southern Plains to the western slopes of the Appalachians, while warmer-than-normal weather should prevail along the Atlantic Seaboard and across the northern High Plains and much of the West. Odds will be tilted toward near- to above-normal rainfall across most of the country, but drier-than-normal conditions can be expected from the Pacific Northwest into the upper Midwest. Source: AgFax
5 Tips for Later Cotton Planting
We’ve been getting calls from several growers who have some cotton acres left to plant and can’t get back in the field to finish, due to heavy recent rains. The insurance cutoff date for planting is today (May 25, 2017) with 1 percent deductions in coverage per day through May 31. Planting on June 1 or later cannot be covered by insurance. With that said, several growers may attempt to plant their remaining acres. Obviously, there aren’t many growers that can continue planting today, due to saturated soils and standing water, but the concern now is their ability to plant before June 1, with additional rain likely in the forecast. This leads to the primary question we’ve been getting: “What is the latest that I can possibly plant cotton?” This is a difficult question to answer and it depends on the amount of risk that a grower can afford to take. First, consider the percentage of your total cotton acres that are comprised of unplanted acres to date. For example, if a 1000-acre cotton grower has 50 acres left to plant (5 percent of their total acres), this would be a scenario of relatively low risk. In other words, if the late-planted acres don’t result in acceptable yields, this scenario may not necessarily present a significant risk. There are certainly other factors that weigh in to how much risk a grower can handle (debt for example) with late planted cotton, that we cannot address here, and that decision is for each individual grower to make. If the same 1000-acre grower has 500 acres left to plant (50 percent of their total acres), this is naturally a considerably higher risk. Additionally, growers must consider the alternative crops they can plant at this time, and if they are competitive in those alternative crops. Also, growers need to consider whether or not they can return their cotton seed….in many cases, seed treated downstream may not be returned, however growers can still decide if they want to plant it this year, or perhaps keep it in storage for next year (with consideration given to potential reductions in germination and seed treatment efficacy). Naturally, there is risk in planting late, but it is still possible to achieve acceptable yields (within 10 percent of optimum for the year), depending on timeliness of management and the weather that each year holds. Risks increase with each day you plant after the insurance cutoff date. The insurance cutoff dates are there for a reason, and these dates generally reflect and align with multi-year planting date research that Dr. Edmisten has conducted. We do not suggest nor guarantee that late-planted cotton will yield as good as cotton planted during the normal recommended planting window, however it is possible to achieve acceptable yields through June 5 or so in most years, depending on the year (weather during the summer and fall) and how timely a grower can be with management. Since planting on June 1 or beyond is not covered by insurance, we do not recommend growers to continue planting cotton beyond May 31, however we will provide some tips that may help you if you do decide to continue planting. There is no magic date that applies to every grower in every year to which cotton should not be planted, however the risk is likely too high past the first week of June for all growers in NC. Dr. Edmisten has shown his planting date research at several winter meetings over the past few years, and basically, his work illustrates that (over several years) optimal yields can be achieved when planting between late April and May 25. When planting beyond June 1, yields become erratic and more variable, and yield potential becomes more dependent on weather during a particular year. For example, late planting may not result in acceptable yields when the summer is wet with several cloudy days, if insects are problematic and not properly controlled, and especially if rains prevent growers from conducting timely PGR or insecticide sprays. This may be even more problematic when the fall is cool and cloudy, especially with an early frost. In such years, retention of earlier set bolls will likely be poor, due to untimely insect sprays, rank growth, cloudy days, and slow maturity of upper bolls in the fall, to the point that some upper bolls wont mature in time. However, if the summer consists of sunny days, timely rains but not excessive rains that delay field work, low insect pressure, and when followed by warm sunny days in the fall with a normal to late frost, later planted cotton can still achieve acceptable yields, with a few qualifiers. Dry summers, although not ideal, can also accelerate maturity. There are other exceptions…..During 2016 for example, some cotton planted in early June yielded as good as earlier planted cotton (or resulted in acceptable yields by some growers’ standards), but this only occurred due to the adverse impacts that Hermine and Matthew had on earlier planted cotton. Every year is different, therefore growers must consider their individual situations, and how much risk they can afford when making these decisions. Say you’ve made the decision to continue planting cotton beyond the insurance date. What can you do at this point to increase your chances of achieving acceptable yields? Below are a few tips: 1. Plant as early as you can get back into your fields. Don’t delay if you have the choice. We will likely have good moisture and temperatures, but don’t let that moisture expire. We need to establish good stands as quickly as possible. 2. Increase seeding rates: This depends on the seeding rate you have been planting up to this point. If you have been planting 46000-47000 seed per acre, you probably don’t need to adjust much. If you have been planting 43500 seed per acre or less, you may want to increase your seeding rates to 46000-47000 seed per acre to influence earliness. It is also important to realize that late planted cotton is even more sensitive to skippy stands, and we cant rely on outer position bolls or vegetative bolls to compensate for skips, like we can for earlier planted cotton. 3. Do you need to switch to an earlier maturing variety?….that depends. Yes, the focus should be on managing for earliness but not at the expense of yield. Growers should continue to match variety performance with a particular environment (yield potential of various fields, sandy vs heavy soils, irrigated vs dryland, etc), and when possible, switch to earlier varieties if those varieties are suitable for that particular environment. Additionally, all varieties should be managed for earliness…..in other words, some may require more timely PGR management than others. Knowing a varieties growth characteristics will be important. However, growers should not switch to early varieties JUST for the sake of earliness if a variety is not competitive in a particular environment. For example, there was a variety in our trials last year that was very early maturing but was only competitive when there was 3-bale yield potential or higher….it was not a competitive variety in lower-yielding environments such as sandy soils that are likely to encounter drought stress. If some of the more full-season varieties are your only option that is suitable for certain fields, you need to manage them for earliness to the best of your ability. The good news is that there are a few varieties that are relatively early maturing that have performed competitively across a number of environments in our trials over the past couple of years. 4. BE TIMELY. Be very timely on everything from here on out. Avoid excessive fertility. When planting cotton late, you lose to luxury to be late on several of your management practices, even late by a couple of days. Your ultimate goal here is to retain as many earlier set bolls as possible. Be timely with thrips sprays….this is always important but late-planted cotton is more sensitive to untimely sprays. Be timely with plant bug sprays….this is also always important but late-planted cotton is ultra-sensitive to untimely sprays. Remember, we need to retain as many of these earlier set squares/bolls as possible in order to achieve acceptable yields. Be timely with bollworm sprays, if they reach damaging levels later during the summer. Be timely with PGRs….We never want to have excessively rank growth, but cotton planted on May 1 may not be penalized much (if at all) if cotton is a little on the tall side (45 inches or so as a maximum) at the end of the year. Late-planted cotton however may not have time to fully develop upper bolls if allowed to grow somewhat tall whereas earlier planted cotton would, and therefore should be closer to 36-38 inches tall at the end of the year. Just to be clear, timely PGR management doesn’t necessarily mean aggressive. Any PGR efforts should be focused on retaining earlier-set lower bolls, but not at the expense of yield. We would not recommend aggressive PGR treatment if the plant isn’t likely to result in rank growth and thereby doesn’t need aggressive PGR treatment (if dry weather persists for example), however if timely rains result in more rapid growth, you cannot afford any delays in maturity that result from rank growth due to late or untimely PGR sprays. With regard to plant bugs, these pests have become more serious over the last few years, and can clearly have a significant impact on yields and maturity if allowed to reach damaging levels unchecked. This pest can go unnoticed and reach economic thresholds rather quickly, and the only way to know is by thorough and frequent scouting. Additionally, if thresholds are reached, it is critically important to react quickly and spray accordingly. Timeliness of sequential sprays is also important. Just because you may have treated for plant bugs recently doesn’t mean that you won’t have to do it again for a while. In other words, these insects can easily and quickly re-invade fields to the point of economic thresholds in a rather short time frame, even within a few days, so you might have to tighten up your scouting intervals to a couple times per week. Dr. Reisig has shared some interesting research regarding the timeliness of sequential applications for plant bugs, which has shown that delaying the second application by only a day or two can result in significant yield penalties. Ultimately, our reaction time to economic thresholds of plant bugs needs to be quick, as well as secondary sprays, in order to achieve optimal yields for all cotton, and is more important in achieving acceptable yields in late-planted cotton. 5. Avoid spending money on unproven inputs, in other words, stick with the basics and do them timely. You can’t afford to forgo good basic weed control, insect control, fertilty and growth regulator use, but avoid excess fertility and other “luxury” inputs to control costs Source: Guy Collins, Keith Edmisten, and Dominic Reisig, North Carolina State University 
Postemergence Herbicide Options
The 2017 Illinois corn crop currently is at various stages of development. Applications of postemergence corn herbicides continue to be made across areas of Illinois, although the recent precipitation has delayed applications in some areas. Even though applications may be delayed, adequate soil moisture coupled with warm temperatures will certainly promote rapid growth of emerged weeds. Properly timing the application of the postemergence herbicide is critical toward achieving the goal of removing weed interference from the corn crop before the weeds adversely impact (i.e., reduce) corn grain yield. Unfortunately, it’s not possible to accurately predict the specific day after planting or emergence when weed interference begins to reduce corn yield. This interval is influenced by many factors and can vary based upon the weed spectrum, the density of certain species, available soil moisture, etc. Weed scientists generally suggest an interval, based either on weed size (in inches) or days after crop/weed emergence, during which postemergence herbicides should be applied to avoid crop yield loss via weed interference. In corn, it is often recommended to remove weeds before they exceed 2 inches tall. The longer weeds are allowed to remain with the crop the greater the likelihood of crop yield loss. It’s important to remember that the labels of most postemergence corn herbicides allow applications at various crop growth stages, but almost all product labels indicate a maximum growth stage beyond which broadcast applications should not be made, and a few even a state minimum growth stage before which applications should not be made. These growth stages are usually indicated as a particular plant height or leaf stage; sometimes both of these are listed. For product labels that indicate a specific corn height and growth state, be sure to follow the more restrictive of the two. Application restrictions exist for several reasons, but of particular importance is the increased likelihood of crop injury if applications are made outside a specified growth stage or range. As mentioned, corn plant height is commonly used on many herbicide labels but plant height may not always provide an accurate indication of the plant’s true physiological maturity. Determining plant height may seem relatively straightforward, but using different benchmarks for measurement can lead to different plant heights. Generally, corn plant height is determined by measuring from the soil surface to the arch of the uppermost leaf that is at least 50% emerged from the whorl. Be sure to measure several plants in a given field and average the numbers. Plant height is obviously influenced by many factors, including genetics and the growing environment. Adverse environmental conditions, such as cool air/soil temperatures, hail, etc., can greatly retard plant height and result in corn plants that are physiologically older than their height suggests. Many agronomists agree that leaf number is a more accurate measurement of corn developmental stage. Counting leaves and counting leaf collars are the two primary techniques used. Leaf counting begins with the short first leaf (the one with a rounded tip) and ends with the leaf that is at least 40–50% emerged from the whorl. Counting leaf collars also begins with the short first leaf, but includes only leaves with a visible collar (the light-colored band where the leaf joins the stem). Leaves in the whorl or those without a fully developed collar are not counted. The leaf collar method quite often stages a corn plant at one leaf less than the leaf counting method. Corn plants under stress conditions may be more prone to injury from postemergence herbicides. Stress can arise from a number of factors, including cool temperatures and wet soils. Be sure to consult the product label when selecting spray additives to include with postemergence herbicides. Many labels suggest changing from one type of additive to another type when the corn crop is under stressful growing conditions. Attempting to save a trip across the field by applying a postemergence corn herbicide with a liquid nitrogen fertilizer solution (such as 28% UAN) as the carrier is not advisable. While applying high rates of UAN by itself can cause corn injury, adding a postemergence herbicide can greatly increase corn injury. Labels of several postemergence corn herbicides (most commonly ALS-inhibiting herbicides but also some HPPD-inhibiting herbicides) include restrictions with respect to applying the product to corn previously treated with certain soil insecticides. Be sure to consult the respective herbicide label for other restrictions and limitations. Source: Aaron Hager, University of Illinois
Be sure to call your Grain Merchandiser today to learn more about our ...
Be sure to call your Grain Merchandiser today to learn more about our High of the Day Contract. The enrollment period ends on June 1st! Click here to contact your local merchandiser: http://auroracoop.com/img/pdf/High%20of%20the%20Day%20Contract3.pdf>
Agronomist Gabe Bathen from our York location stopped by this field ...
Agronomist Gabe Bathen from our York location stopped by this field receiving aerial application to discuss some of its benefits when there is moisture in the field. #YourYieldTour #YourYieldsYourFields #YourYieldMatters>
Your Yield Tour -- Gabe Bathen on Aerial Application
The sun is out! It's going to be a great day! Photo credit to Josh ...
The sun is out! It's going to be a great day! Photo credit to Josh Dexter, agronomist in Wood River>
When Should We Start Paying Attention to Crop Condition Ratings?
The USDA will report crop condition ratings for the 2017 U.S corn and soybean crops in the 18 major producing states in the weekly Crop Progress report beginning May 30 and continuing until harvest. Weekly crop condition ratings have been made for all the major producing states since 1986. Market participants typically follow the crop condition ratings closely as an indication of crop health, yield potential, and change in yield potential as the growing season proceeds (e.g., farmdoc daily, July 19, 2011; August 4, 2011; September 9, 2011; July 14, 2016). Recent research documents that these ratings indeed have a substantial market impact during the growing season (Lehecka, 2014). In a farmdoc daily article yesterday (May 23, 2017), Gary Schnitkey showed that early season crop condition ratings do not tell us much about corn yield prospects in Illinois. This naturally leads to the question of when do condition ratings provide useful information about potential yields. In this article, we examine the relationship between crop condition ratings at various times in the growing season and the U.S. average yield of corn and soybeans in order to determine when we should pay serious attention to the ratings. Read the entire story here.
ACE Character Award May 2017
Congratulations to May's winner Tim Mann of Aurora! Tim was nominated ...
Congratulations to May's winner Tim Mann of Aurora! Tim was nominated for not only going above and beyond every time he is at work but also for his dedication to his community and neighborhood. Congrats Tim! Also don't forget to leave some feedback below about the new idea of starting a special drawing to recognize our owners and all they do in their communities!>
Will Planting Delays Require Switching Corn Hybrid Maturities?
According to the USDA/NASS, for the week ending May 21, corn was 73 percent planted, which was 24 percent ahead of last year and the same as the five-year average. However, persistent rains and saturated soil conditions have resulted in replanting and delayed corn planting. The weather forecast this week indicates the likelihood of more rain so it is probable that many soggy fields may not be drying out soon. Given this outlook, is there a need to switch from full season to shorter season hybrids? Probably not - in most situations full season hybrids will perform satisfactorily (i.e. will achieve physiological maturity or "black layer" before a killing frost) even when planted as late as May 25, if not later in some regions of the state. Results of studies evaluating hybrid response to delayed planting dates indicate that hybrids of varying maturity can "adjust" their growth and development in response to a shortened growing season. A hybrid planted in late May will mature at a faster thermal rate (i.e. require fewer heat units) than the same hybrid planted in late April or early May). In Ohio State and Purdue University studies, we've observed decreases in required heat units from planting to kernel black layer which average about 6.8 growing degree days (GDDs) per day of delayed planting. Therefore a hybrid rated at 2800 GDDs with normal planting dates (i.e. late April or early May) may require slightly less than 2600 GDDs when planted in late May or early June, i.e. a 30 day delay in planting may result in a hybrid maturing in 204 fewer GDDs (30 days multiplied by 6.8 GDDs per day). There are other factors concerning hybrid maturity, however, that need to be considered. Although a full season hybrid may still have a yield advantage over shorter season hybrids planted in late May, it could have significantly higher grain moisture at maturity than earlier maturing hybrids if it dries down slowly. Moreover, there are many short-to mid-season hybrids with excellent yield potential. Therefore, if you think you may end up planting in late May or early June, consider the dry down characteristics of your various hybrids. In recent years we’ve seen a range of drying conditions. In years with hot, dry conditions in September, some mid- to- full season hybrids had grain moisture levels at harvest similar to those of short season hybrids because of rapid dry down rates. However, in other years, cool, wet conditions after maturity slowed dry down and major differences in grain moisture at harvest were evident between early and full season hybrids. Late planting dates (roughly after May 25) increase the possibility of damage from European corn borer (ECB) and western bean cutworm and warrant selection of Bt hybrids (if suitable maturities are available) that effectively target these insects. In past OSU studies, Bt hybrids planted after the first week of June consistently outyielded non-Bt counterparts even at low to moderate levels of ECB. For more information on selecting corn hybrids for delayed planting, consult "Delayed Planting & Hybrid Maturity Decisions", a Purdue/Ohio State University Extension publication available online at: http://www.agry.purdue.edu/ext/pubs/AY-312-W.pdf . Source: Peter Thomison, Ohio State University Extension
Ag Economy-Farmers ?Battle for Profits?
Donnelle Eller reported on the front page of Sunday’s Des Moines Register that, “This year could be pivotal for many Iowa farmers, battling to turn a profit as they plant 23.4 million corn and soybean acres across the state. “Financial pressure is beginning to show. Iowa farmers are leaning more on debt, with production loans climbing 39 percent to $8.4 billion over the past five years, federal bank data shows. Loans 30 days or more past due have increased 180 percent to about $84 million since 2011, Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. data shows. Even so, the delinquency rate, while pushing higher, remains near 1 percent, based on loan data provided by Ohio State University. “Delinquency rates are rising from record lows to around historic averages, said Chad Hart, an Iowa State University agricultural economist.” Sunday’s article explained that: ‘There could be a wave of financial issues still coming in the farm sector as we continue to see low prices and the erosion of the farm financial sheet,’ Hart said. The Register article pointed out that, “Debt for Iowa farmland and other real estate has climbed 50 percent to $8.6 billion over the past five years, federal commercial bank data shows. “The amount of delinquent loans also has risen 55 percent to nearly $93 million. “Still, the delinquency rate for ag real estate has inched only to about 1.1 percent.” The article added that, “Loans to producers in Iowa, Nebraska, South Dakota and Wyoming grew to $25.2 billion last year, a 6.5 percent increase over 2015 and a nearly 60 percent spike over 2011. “Farm Credit Services of America’s at-risk loans climbed to $178.7 million last year, more than doubling over three years.” Ms. Eller also noted that, “Still, Steve Bruere, president of the Peoples Co., a Clive farm brokerage and management business, sees improving conditions. “In March, none of Peoples Co.’s farm clients was delinquent on rent payments or pushed for last-minute lease renegotiations — far different from 2015. “And Bruere said land values are stabilizing. Iowa farmland values have fallen about 18 percent to $7,183 an acre from a 2013 record high, according to ISU land surveys.” The Register article also turned to the importance of trade: In a year of uncertainties, trade could be the biggest. “Any bumps in demand for grain and livestock exports would be troublesome for an industry fighting to hang on. “‘If we have another bumper crop … we could take these markets another step down,’ Hart said. ‘I’m hoping for an average crop, not a great crop.’” Sunday’s article reminded readers that, “President Trump has threatened tariffs on trade with China, Canada and Mexico, and announced Thursday he will renegotiate the North America Free Trade Agreement with neighbors in Canada and Mexico. “‘The trade policy uncertainty has the potential to do more harm than good to the ag markets right now,’ Hart said. “U.S. Ag Secretary Sonny Perdue created an undersecretary position directly overseeing trade. He said in Iowa he expected to have NAFTA renegotiated within six months.” Meanwhile, a recent update from Iowa State University Extension (“Cash Rental Rates for Iowa, 2017 Survey“) indicated that, “The cash rental rate information presented in this publication is from a survey of farmers, landowners, agricultural lenders, and professional farm managers.” The report also included the following graphs, which pointed to a statewide average of cash rental rates from 2013-2017 on corn and soybean acres. The statewide average rate has gone down from $270 in 2013, to $219 in 2017. Graphs from, “Cash Rental Rates for Iowa, 2017 Survey.” Iowa State University Extension. Click Image to Enlarge Looking at at the agricultural economy from a different perspective, Wall Street Journal writer Bob Tita reported late last week that, “Farm-machinery maker Deere raised its profit forecast for the year by 33% on booming demand in South America, an unexpectedly rosy outlook that sent shares in agricultural equipment and supply companies up sharply. “Cash-flush farmers in Brazil and elsewhere in South America are expected to buy 20% more tractors and harvesting combines after record harvests this year, Deere said, even as industrywide sales are expected to fall 5% in the U.S. and Canada amid a multiyear slump in prices for corn, wheat and soybeans.” The Journal article noted that, “Deere’s bullish outlook marks a rare bright spot for an industry struggling amid a long downturn in the U.S. farm economy. The Moline, Ill.-based company said it still expects lackluster sales of its green-and-yellow tractors and combines this year in the U.S. and Canada, which accounted for about 70% of its farm-equipment sales last year. “The slump, driven by years of strong harvests that have produced record global grain stockpiles, is pushing some U.S. farmers to the brink of bankruptcy. That has left them with less cash to buy everything from seeds to combines, weighing on major agriculture-focused firms. Deere’s farm equipment sales fell 36% to $18.5 billion in 2016 from a peak of $29.1 billion in 2013. ‘We’re not seeing significant changes in the outlook for our farmer customers,’ said Tony Huegel, Deere’s director of investor relations. ‘It’s hard to argue today for significant recovery in commodity prices.’ In other news, Stephen Steed reported last week at ArkansasOnline that, “Heavy rains in late April and floods in early May cost farmers $175 million, with rice farmers being hit the hardest, according to the latest estimates by the University of Arkansas System’s Agriculture Division.” Mr. Steed indicated that, “According to the latest figures, some 977,800 acres of crops in 21 counties were affected by storms and flooding, with 361,650 acres a complete loss. The May 5 estimate put damaged crops at 937,000 acres, also with about two-thirds likely to survive. “Farmers lost 181,450 acres of rice, the most heavily planted crop at the time the rains began.” And with respect to the dairy sector, Heather Haddon reported on Saturday at The Wall Street Journal Online that, “U.S. dairy farmers’ big bet on global demand for milk is souring. “The industry was in trouble long before a trade squabble with Canada last month that reduced demand for ultrafiltered milk, a cheese ingredient. Dairy farmers fear a spat that has jeopardized roughly $150 million in sales for Wisconsin, New York and Minnesota producers is just a prelude to disruptions to come if President Donald Trump renegotiates the North American Free Trade Agreement as promised.” The Journal article pointed out that, “Dairy farmers aggressively expanded their herds three years ago when milk prices were driven up by growing demand from middle-class consumers in North America, Asia and other markets. By March, there were 9.4 million commercial dairy cows in the U.S., a 20-year high, according to the Agriculture Department. “But China, Russia, Venezuela and other importers scaled back their dairy purchasing in recent years due to domestic troubles. The European Union, meanwhile, greatly increased its dairy production after lifting 30-year-old quotas in 2015. Then came a world-wide surge in agricultural production that has pushed down prices for grains and meat as well as for dairy.” Ms. Haddon stated that: Commodities markets like dairy are prone to booms and busts because of the long lead time to ramp up supply. But the current glut—and the accompanying downswing in exports—may pose one of the biggest challenges yet to the U.S. dairy industry. “The glut is likely to grow this spring, the most productive time of the year as temperatures rise and days grow longer. An unusually mild winter started this year’s milking season months early at some dairies, further contributing to the milk crush.” The Journal article also indicated that, “In a recent interview, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue said renegotiating Nafta could improve access to Canada for U.S. farmers. ‘We’re going to try and balance the scorecard in a number of ways,’ he said. “Tom Vilsack, agriculture secretary during the Obama administration and current president of the U.S. Dairy Export Council, urged the Trump administration to find new foreign buyers for American milk. “‘To keep pace with those efficiencies in productivity, we have to look for additional markets,’ Mr. Vilsack said.” Source: Farm Policy News
National
Larger feedlot supply will be on the fed market later this year
The USDA’s latest cattle on feed report shows a lot of cattle were placed into feedlots. ?There were good reasons for placements to be big in April,? said David Anderson, agriculture economist at Texas A&M University, in an interview with Brownfield commodity reporter John Perkins.? Higher cash cattle bids and vigorous beef demand played roles.? The two percent bump in numbers of cattle on feed implies growing cattle supplies, with more cows and more calves that are now showing up in feedlots, according to Anderson.? Continue reading Larger feedlot supply will be on the fed market later this year at Brownfield Ag News.      
Big questions loom as planting delays carry into June
A grain market analyst says she?s curious to see how farmers respond to continued planting delays. Wet conditions have slowed planting progress in many parts of the Midwest this spring and forced some growers to replant. Naomi Blohm with Stewart-Peterson says as the calendar turns to June, the window for planting corn is quickly closing. “I have some farmers who are saying ‘you know what, forget it!? Continue reading Big questions loom as planting delays carry into June at Brownfield Ag News.      
USDA raises FY-2017 ag export forecast
The ag export forecast for this fiscal year has been increased by the USDA. The fourth-quarter estimate is now 137-Billion-dollars, higher than the estimate in February by about a-Billion-dollars. USDA chief economist Rob Johannsen says China is buying a lot of U.S. soybeans and cotton, ?So, we are seeing an increase in our value of oilseeds going up slightly. But, certainly from last year, it?s gone up.? And, he says the May export forecast for cotton is good, ?It?s up almost a-half-a-Billion-dollars to a total of 5.4-Billion and that?s on higher import demand in China and Indonesia as well.? Total meat and dairy exports are up 600-Milion-dollars from the previous quarter, mostly because of strong red meat shipments. Continue reading USDA raises FY-2017 ag export forecast at Brownfield Ag News.      
USDA crop condition ratings useful for projecting yield
Agriculture economist Scott Irwin says market stakeholders should start giving more attention to USDA corn and soybean condition ratings. ?Soon,? Irwin told Brownfield Ag News.? ?Not quite now, but soon.? Irwin ? at the University of Illinois ? says USDA crop condition ratings ? the percentage of the crop that?s very poor, poor, fair, good or excellent ? are useful in projecting crop yield. ?You just plug in this week?s good plus excellent ratings, and out pops a yield forecast,? said Irwin.? Continue reading USDA crop condition ratings useful for projecting yield at Brownfield Ag News.      
Minnesota farm groups see some priorities addressed this session
Leading farm groups are pleased some of their priorities have been addressed in the 2017 Minnesota Legislative Session. Minnesota Farm Bureau?s Cole Rupprecht says legislators and the Dayton administration worked until three o?clock Friday morning to finalize a special session that began Monday. “There are several provisions within many of those bills that we are supportive of.? First off, in the tax bill, Minnesota Farm Bureau is very happy and supportive of the 40 percent credit on ag property taxes that relates to school bond debt levies.” The Minnesota Farmers Union (MFU) also supported the 40 percent ag land credit included in the tax bill, one of several pieces of legislation still unsigned by the Governor. Continue reading Minnesota farm groups see some priorities addressed this session at Brownfield Ag News.      
Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: May 26, 2017
Jul. corn closed at $3.74 and 1/4,?up 5?cents Jul. soybeans closed at $9.26 and 1/2,?down 13 cents Jul. soybean meal closed at $301.80,?down $2.90 Jul. soybean oil closed at 31.60,?down?44?points Jul. wheat closed at $4.38 and 1/4,?up 7?and?1/2?cents Jun. live cattle closed at $122.70,?down $1.22 Jun.?lean hogs closed at $81.82,?up?87?cents Jul.? Continue reading Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: May 26, 2017 at Brownfield Ag News.      
Senate passes agro-terrorism measure
The U.S. Senate has passed a bill to address the threat of agro-terrorism and protect the safety of the nation?s food supply. The measure would integrate food, agriculture and animal and human health sectors into the Department of Homeland Security domestic preparedness policy initiatives. It is sponsored by Ag Committee chair Pat Roberts of Kansas and Missouri Senator Claire McCaskill, Ranking Member of the Senate Homeland Security Committee. Roberts says the spread of any deadly pathogen among livestock and plant populations would be devastating and agriculture needs to be at the table in case of an attack.? Continue reading Senate passes agro-terrorism measure at Brownfield Ag News.      
Cattle futures closed sharply lower
Feedlot country was quiet on Friday with just a few scattered sales reported in parts of Western Nebraska and Colorado at 132.50 live. At this point it looks like final trade volume totals will be on the short side, possibly forcing packers to start out after the holiday fairly close to the knife. The weekly cattle slaughter was estimated at 613,000 head, 11,000 above the previous week, and 27,000 higher than 2016. Boxed beef cutout values were weak on light to moderate demand and offerings. Continue reading Cattle futures closed sharply lower at Brownfield Ag News.      
Milk futures lower, cash dairy mixed
Class III milk futures at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange took back a chunk of the previous session’s gains. June was $.09 lower at $16.51, July was $.21 lower at $17.04, August was down $.18 at $17.40, and September was $.13 lower at $17.44. Cash cheese blocks up $.0125 at $1.7325. Two loads were sold, one at $1.72 and one at $1.7325. The last uncovered offer was for one load at $1.7325. Continue reading Milk futures lower, cash dairy mixed at Brownfield Ag News.      
USDA reports big April cattle placements
The USDA’s latest cattle on feed report shows a lot of cattle were placed into feedlots in April. Texas A&M University Professor and Extension Economist David Anderson tells Brownfield recent cash cattle business and beef demand both played a role, “Feeders have made some money and packers have made some money in all of this and we’ve continued to pull cattle forward, because we’ve had some really great both domestic and export demand for beef.” Anderson says the industry won’t fully feel the impact until late summer or early fall, but he’s optimistic, “I think all the indications are that we’ll continue to have very good exports of beef, that’s going to help us out. Continue reading USDA reports big April cattle placements at Brownfield Ag News.      
Dairy industry sees value in Indy 500 tradition
The leader of the Dairy Business Association says milk?s place in the Indianapolis 500 auto race is a tradition that?s important to the industry. President Mike North says it?s always nice when you see an event like the Indianapolis 500 that?s closely followed by a very broad demographic to be promoting dairy. ?“That promotion is always well received by the dairy industry and certainly one that we hope can continue to spell out the health benefits and nutritional value of not just fluid milk, but all dairy products.” The winner of the race not only gets the trophy, but also a big, cold bottle of milk.? Continue reading Dairy industry sees value in Indy 500 tradition at Brownfield Ag News.      
Nebraska legislator plans constitutional amendment on property taxes
A state senator in Nebraska says he will introduce a constitutional amendment to lower property taxes. ?We?ve been talking about property taxes for 40 years,? says Senator Steve Erdman of Bayard. ?It is my opinion that we?ve talked long enough?and it?s time to do something.? Erdman says he?ll introduce the amendment at the start of the 2018 legislative session. ?My intention is to introduce a constitutional amendment the first of January, when we return, and ask the legislature to adopt it and put it on the ballot in November,? he says. Continue reading Nebraska legislator plans constitutional amendment on property taxes at Brownfield Ag News.      
Crop insurance cuts could impact credit availability
Farmers are not the only ones concerned about potential cuts to the federal crop insurance program. Nathan Kauffman, ag economist with the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, says ag lenders have a lot at stake as well. ?When it comes to availability of credit, certainly the ability to limit the downside risk that producers have weighs into the credit decisions,? Kauffman says, ?and I think most lenders world require crop insurance, in many places, as part of that risk management profile.? Kauffman made those comments at a Senate Agriculture Committee hearing on the farm economy. Continue reading Crop insurance cuts could impact credit availability at Brownfield Ag News.      
Tight window for 1st cutting alfalfa
An extension educator says farmers will have to toe a fine line to harvest a quality first cutting of alfalfa this season. ?It?s a fine line right now with rain and humidity and lots of heat for that alfalfa to grow?the alfalfa is still growing rapidly?and it makes it difficult to get in there and cut.? Phil Kaatz with Michigan State University Extension tells Brownfield the longer cut alfalfa sits in a field before it?s harvested, the more yield potential will be reduced for the rest of the season.? Continue reading Tight window for 1st cutting alfalfa at Brownfield Ag News.      
Nebraska stands to benefit ?greatly? from China beef deal
Nebraska ag director Greg Ibach says the state stands to benefit greatly if China follows through with its promise to resume imports of U.S. beef. ?We?re the number one beef slaughter state in the nation. We?re the number one cattle-on-feed state in the nation. And, overall, we have about 20 percent market share of all the beef leaving the U.S. for another country,? Ibach says. Nebraska will take an aggressive approach to the Chinese market, Ibach says. Continue reading Nebraska stands to benefit ‘greatly’ from China beef deal at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
Attention Turns to Crop Ratings
Grain markets are lower as traders return from the long holiday weekend. Outside markets have a heavy data week in front of them, beginning today with Personal Spending.
Maximize Farm Productivity Using Tech With Dino Giacomazzi
Take advantage of the many free apps and internet-based tools available today, advises Dino Giacomazzi, a dairy producer in Hanford, Calif. He'll speak at the 2017 Tomorrow's Top Producer conference July 20-21 in Nashville.
Why a Negative PPD Is a Good Thing
Dairy farmers usually see red when their end-of-the-month settlement check lists a negative PPD (Producer Price Differential).
AgDay Daily Recap - May 29, 2017
AGDAY
Colostrum's Lifetime Advantage
The bank of evidence supporting the virtues of bovine colostrum has grown even more with a new study performed by Chinese researchers.
'Fitbits' for Cows: The Latest Precision Dairy Monitoring Technology
New wearable technologies for dairy cows monitor individual animal activity to improve farm management and performance.
'Plant Factories' Churn Out Clean Food in China's Dirty Cities
Researchers build urban farms, crop labs to combat contamination.
Salmonella Infections Turn Deadly
A particularly virulent and deadly strain of Salmonella Heidelberg has killed calves and infected humans in the Midwest in 2016.
Actual Versus Intentions: Mother Nature Rules
As the May planting window draws to a close, Mother Nature is taking the driver’s seat away from the Chicago Board of Trade. Jerry Gulke explains.
American Wheat Great Again as Exports to Overtake Russia's
U.S. to regain its leading position for first time in 3 years.
Another Hemisphere
Events in another hemisphere are affecting (or is it afflicting?) US ag producers with a lot more frequency and severity these days, or at least it seems like it. We are of course talking about the Southern Hemisphere vs. the Northern Hemisphere inhabited by US farmers and ranchers.
Grain Basis Popping In Some Regions
South Africa Predicts Record Corn Crop After Rain Boosts Yields
April food-price inflation slowed to 6.6 percent year-on-year.
Wild Horses Could be Sold for Slaughter in Trump Budget Plan
President Donald Trump's budget proposal calls for saving $10 million next year by selling wild horses captured throughout the U.S. West without the requirement that buyers guarantee the animals won't be resold for slaughter.
Pete's Pick of the Week: International Harvester 91 Combine
This combine sold last Saturday.