CORN  
Delivery Date Cash Price Basis Futures Change Futures Price
History Nov17 2.99 11/20/2017 5:39:00 AM CST -0.44
 -0'4
342'4
History Dec17 3.08 11/20/2017 5:39:00 AM CST -0.35
 -0'4
342'4
History Jan18 3.12 11/20/2017 5:39:00 AM CST -0.42
 -0'6
354'2
History Feb18 3.14 11/20/2017 5:39:00 AM CST -0.40
 -0'6
354'2
History Mar18 3.16 11/20/2017 5:39:00 AM CST -0.38
 -0'6
354'2
History Apr18 3.18 11/20/2017 5:36:00 AM CST -0.45
 -1'0
362'4
History May18 3.20 11/20/2017 5:36:00 AM CST -0.43
 -1'0
362'4
History Oct18 3.46 11/20/2017 5:32:00 AM CST -0.40
 -1'4
385'6
History Nov18 3.46 11/20/2017 5:32:00 AM CST -0.40
 -1'4
385'6
 
SOYBEANS  
Delivery Date Cash Price Basis Futures Change Futures Price
History Nov17 8.80 11/20/2017 5:38:00 AM CST -1.05
 -5'6
984'6
History Dec17 8.85 11/20/2017 5:38:00 AM CST -1.00
 -5'6
984'6
History Jan18 8.91 11/20/2017 5:38:00 AM CST -1.05
 -5'6
995'6
History Oct18 9.01 11/20/2017 5:32:00 AM CST -0.95
 -5'4
995'4
Local
Our Bertrand location did it's annual hats and gloves drive for all ...
Our Bertrand location did it's annual hats and gloves drive for all kindergarten students in the local schools! The Bertrand and Loomis students were excited to get new hats and gloves to keep them warm on the playground! #yourfuture>
National
LibertyLink ranked highest soybean trait platform for 2017
A product manager with Bayer says a recent independent market research study revealed its LibertyLink was the highest rated soybean this year among growers surveyed. About 500 growers in 21 states were surveyed on their seed trait decisions and what they think of existing traits on the market. He tells Brownfield?the survey revealed that weed control is the main reason farmers select the product. “Really just phenomenal results across difficult to control weeds, resistant weeds, and the core driver weeds: marestail, water hemp, palmer,” he says. Continue reading LibertyLink ranked highest soybean trait platform for 2017 at Brownfield Ag News.      
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Our Bertrand location did it's annual hats and gloves drive for all ...
Our Bertrand location did it's annual hats and gloves drive for all kindergarten students in the local schools! The Bertrand and Loomis students were excited to get new hats and gloves to keep them warm on the playground! #yourfuture>
Corn, soybeans, and wheat are all a little firmer to end the week. ...
Corn, soybeans, and wheat are all a little firmer to end the week. The market is anticipating that this afternoon's Commitment of Traders report will show near record short positions in the corn market. Market participants are starting to thin as traders trim positions ahead of next week?s holiday shortened week. With limited fresh news, CBOT traders are looking for a quick short covering day to offer support as we close out the week. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn +2, Soybeans +4, KC Wheat +4.>
Today, the Crop Science division of Bayer released results from an ...
Today, the Crop Science division of Bayer released results from an independent market research survey, revealing that the LibertyLink? system was the highest rated trait platform of the year.>
Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for two full-time with ...
Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for two full-time with benefits Propane/Fuel Delivery drivers. One position in the St. Paul area and one in the Gibbon area. CDL required and have to be able to obtain hazmat endorsement. Click here to apply: http://auroracoop.com/ContactUs>
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Come by and see us at the Gateway Farm Expo in Kearney!
Come by and see us at the Gateway Farm Expo in Kearney!>
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Thank you to all veterans including our employees and their family ...
Thank you to all veterans including our employees and their family members for serving our country and protecting our freedoms #VeteransDay2017>
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Thanks for sharing!
Thanks for sharing!>
Come visit us at our tailgate today! Fire is hot and the chili is ...
Come visit us at our tailgate today! Fire is hot and the chili is warm!! GBR! ??
This is so true!
This is so true!>
Great photo!! Thanks for sharing it with us!
Great photo!! Thanks for sharing it with us!>
Here is another great pic! Thanks for sharing Levi Elge!
Here is another great pic! Thanks for sharing Levi Elge!>
Chris Eickmann sent us this awesome picture of our Sedan Terminal in ...
Chris Eickmann sent us this awesome picture of our Sedan Terminal in the sunset...thanks for sharing this with us Chris! #harvest17>
Local
Our Bertrand location did it's annual hats and gloves drive for all ...
Our Bertrand location did it's annual hats and gloves drive for all kindergarten students in the local schools! The Bertrand and Loomis students were excited to get new hats and gloves to keep them warm on the playground! #yourfuture>
Low Temperature and Frost May Affect Efficacy of Burndown Herbicides
Recently we received several phone calls about control of winter annual weeds in the fall and how temperature and frost might affect herbicide efficacy. As fall temperatures will continue to drop, it is important for growers to decide as soon as possible about applying herbicides this fall. The most common winter weeds in Nebraska are marestail, henbit, field pennycress, prickly lettuce, shepherd’s-purse, downy brome, tansy mustard, and dandelion. Identification of winter annual weeds is important to select the proper herbicide for effective management. (For more information see Identification of Winter Annual Weeds, Nebraska Extension EC 304.) Fall herbicide application is not needed in each field. Herbicide timing to achieve the most effective control varies according to the weed species present. That's why field scouting is important before you decide about herbicide application. For example, if you see a lot of marestail, a fall herbicide application is needed. Marestail is a significant problem weed in Nebraska. Most marestail in Nebraska is resistant to glyphosate and the ALS group of herbicides (Classic®, Permit®, Pursuit®, and Raptor®) and is challenging to control with only a glyphosate burndown program. A recent survey reported that more than 2 million acres in Nebraska is infested with herbicide-resistant marestail. Marestail can emerge in the fall and in the spring; however, most marestail in Nebraska is fall emerging and more effectively controlled in the fall when it's in a seedling stage. Tank-mixing a residual herbicide with a burndown product will improve marestail control because the residual activity will control marestail emerging after herbicide application. Effect of Temperature on Herbicide Efficacy Corn and soybean harvests were late this year due to rains in September and October and fall burndown applications were delayed in much of the state. With seasonally low air temperatures at this time, growers have asked about how temperature will affect the efficacy of fall burndown herbicide applications. The likelihood of reduced weed control due to cool temperatures will vary depending on the target weed, herbicide, and rate of application. The ideal temperature for applying most post-emergence herbicides is between 65°F and 85°F; however, that window is not always practical with other fall practices. Herbicides can be applied at temperatures of 40°F to 60°F, but weeds may be killed slowly. When the temperature is below 60°F, absorption of herbicides such as glyphosate and translocation of herbicides such as 2,4-D are lower compared with applications at higher temperature; therefore, they act slowly. Herbicides applied in the fall will NOT provide control of summer annual weeds such as common waterhemp or palmer amaranth because they do not emerge until May. When the temperature is below 40°F for an extended time after burndown herbicide application, weed control will most likely be reduced, specifically for a systemic burndown herbicide such as glyphosate. Additionally, weed control may be reduced under cloudy conditions following an initial temperature drop below 40°F. With late-fall herbicide applications be sure to add labeled adjuvants to improve herbicide efficacy. For example, if you are planning to apply 2,4-D, add crop oil concentrates at 1% v/v (1 gallon per 100-gallon spray solution) or non-ionic surfactant at 0.25% v/v (1 quart per 100-gallon spray solution). Spray volume should be 15 gallons per acre for better coverage when a dense weed population is present. Effect of Frost on Herbicide Efficacy Actively growing weeds are the key to achieving good control, whatever herbicide you use. When weeds are under stress, herbicide efficacy drops. Frosts of less than 25°F usually cause leaf damage to annual plants, making them poor targets for herbicide applications; however, winter annual weeds may tolerate usually a frost up to 20°F and continue growing when conditions improve, with little tissue damage. Symptoms of frost damage to leaves are a water-soaked appearance shortly after the frost. This is followed by a darkened or blackened appearance within a day or so, and then necrosis after a few days. After weeds experience frost active growth may not begin again for a few days. Growers should wait until new leaf tissue is produced, scout the field, and then consider applying herbicide. Generally, this would be when nighttime temperatures are 35°F or greater and daytime temperatures are at least 50°F for two consecutive days. Additionally, bright sunshine is needed for plants to recover. marestail fall seedling Winter Weeds and Soybean Cyst Nematode Six winter annual weeds have been identified as alternate hosts to soybean cyst nematode (SCN): purple deadnettle (strong host), henbit (strong host), field pennycress (moderate host), shepherd’s-purse (weak host), small-flowered bittercress (weak host), and common chickweed (weak host). SCN can reproduce in the field on henbit and purple deadnettle. For more information, see this Purdue University Extension resource, Winter Annual Weeds and Soybean Cyst Nematode Management. Source: Amit Jhala, University of Nebraska CropWatch
U.S Ag Exports Soar to 3rd Highest Level on Record
U.S. agricultural exports reached the third-highest level on record in 2017, according to information released Nov. 16, 2017, by Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue. U.S. agricultural exports totaled $140.5 billion in fiscal year 2017, climbing nearly $10.9 billion from the previous year, Perdue said. The U.S. agricultural sector posted an annual trade surplus, which reached $21.3 billion, up almost 30% from last year’s $16.6 billion. U.S. agriculture has had a trade surplus for more than 50 years. “U.S. agriculture depends on trade. It is great to see an increase in exports and we hope to open additional markets to build on this success,” Perdue said. “I’m a grow-it-and-sell-it kind of guy. If American agricultural producers keep growing it, USDA will keep helping to sell it around the world.” China finished the fiscal year as the United States’ largest export customer, with shipments valued at $22 billion, followed closely by Canada at $20.4 billion. U.S. agricultural exports to Mexico reached $18.6 billion, a 6% gain from last year, while exports to Japan grew 12%, to $11.8 billion. Rounding out the top 10 markets were the European Union ($11.6 billion), South Korea ($6.9 billion), Hong Kong ($4 billion), Taiwan ($3.4 billion), Indonesia ($3 billion) and the Philippines ($2.6 billion). U.S. bulk commodity exports set a volume record at 159 million metric tons, up 11% from FY 2016, while their value rose 16% to $51.4 billion. The surge was led by soybean exports, which reached a record 60 million metric tons, valued at $24 billion. Exports of corn, wheat and cotton all grew as well, with the value of cotton exports climbing 70%, to $5.9 billion, wheat exports up 21% to $6.2 billion, and corn exports up 6%, to $9.7 billion. A number of other products saw significant export increases as well. U.S. dairy exports grew 17% to $5.3 billion, beef exports were up 16% to $7.1 billion, and pork exports rose 14% to $6.4 billion. Overall, horticultural product exports increased 3% to nearly $33.9 billion, largely driven by an 8% increase in exports of tree nuts, which reached $8.1 billion, the second-highest total on record. Processed food and beverage exports rose 2% to $39.2 billion. Exports are responsible for 20% of U.S. farm income, also driving rural economic activity and supporting more than one million American jobs both on and off the farm. Complete FY 2017 (Oct. 2016-Sept. 2017) agricultural export data are available from the Global Agricultural Trade System (GATS) database: https://apps.fas.usda.gov/gats/. Source: Farm Futures
Potential Ag Losses Increase Industry Anxiety
A group of 168 farm organizations and companies wrote all 50 governors on Tuesday seeking to defend the North American Free Trade Agreement, reflecting that agricultural groups are more than just a little worried about the prospect of President Donald Trump moving to withdraw from NAFTA. Farm groups have made it clear over the past few weeks that they are increasingly concerned the president may follow through on his desire to invoke Article 2205 of NAFTA, which allows withdrawal from the agreement within six months after providing notice to Canada and Mexico. Tensions in the NAFTA talks are definitely heightening. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue told reporters in Washington last week his department was making plans in case President Trump follows through. Mexico is also preparing an economic response if withdrawal begins. Reuters quoted Mexico’s Foreign Minister on Tuesday, stating that the Mexican government and central bank are preparing for a possible future without NAFTA. See Reuters story here. The next round of talks on the $1.2 trillion trade agreement begins Wednesday in Mexico, but top negotiators are scheduled to start meeting again on Friday. House Agriculture Committee Chairman Mike Conaway, R-Texas, and other committee members met with representatives from commodity groups last week. Conaway told reporters last week during a call that farm groups are anxious that nothing is done in the trade talks that is disruptive to current trade. “It was clear from every single one of them that they are anxious, or beyond anxious, about the idea of withdrawing from NAFTA,” Conaway said on a press call. “That came through loud and clear.” In writing to all 50 governors, the 168 businesses and farm groups asked the governors to let President Trump know they support modernizing NAFTA but that withdrawal would have adverse impacts. “We encourage NAFTA negotiations to continue without the threat of withdrawal,” the groups stated. The letter to governors noted the agriculture and food industry “supports more than 22 million jobs — including more manufacturing jobs than any other U.S. manufacturing sector — and accounts for 20% of the U.S. economy.” Under NAFTA, U.S. agricultural and food exports have grown by 450%, the letter pointed out, and the U.S. holds a 65% share of agricultural products in the NAFTA region. Nearly $43 billion in food and agricultural products were sent to Canada and Mexico last year alone. So a radical change in the tariff and quota structure for those markets would have a major impact on the agricultural economy nationally. The farm groups and businesses said a study by ImpactECON stated withdrawal from NAFTA would cost a $13 billion economic loss to the agricultural economy alone. “NAFTA withdrawal would also disrupt critical industry supply chains, close markets, eliminate jobs and increase prices for the basic needs of American consumers,” the letter stated. More details on the impacts of a NAFTA withdrawal on individual commodities was spelled out in the letter. The full letter and everyone who signed it can be found here. Conaway, again talking to reporters last week about NAFTA, said he and others in Congress would continue pointing out the harm that would be done to agriculture by walking away from the agreement. Conaway also praised President Trump as having a “long and successful history of negotiating” business deals. Yet, Conaway added there is a different mindset in business deals than trade talks. “They (the Trump administration) want to get a deal, but if you read Mr. Trump’s ‘Art of the Deal,’ he’s not afraid to walk away,” Conaway said. Source: Chris Clayton, DTN
Corn, soybeans, and wheat are all a little firmer to end the week. ...
Corn, soybeans, and wheat are all a little firmer to end the week. The market is anticipating that this afternoon's Commitment of Traders report will show near record short positions in the corn market. Market participants are starting to thin as traders trim positions ahead of next week?s holiday shortened week. With limited fresh news, CBOT traders are looking for a quick short covering day to offer support as we close out the week. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn +2, Soybeans +4, KC Wheat +4.>
EPA, Army Corps of Engineers Propose Two-year Delay of WOTUS
The U.S. EPA and the U.S. Department of the Army are proposing to delay the effective date of the Waters of the U.S. rule by two years. “Today’s proposal shows our commitment to our state and tribal partners and to providing regulatory certainty to our nation’s farmers, ranchers and businesses,” said EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt. “This step will allow us to minimize confusion as we continue to receive input from across the country on how we should revise the definition of the ‘waters of the United States.'” The 2015 rule, which redefined the scope of where the Clean Water Act applies, had an effective date of Aug. 28, 2015. Implementation of the 2015 rule is on hold as a result of the Sixth Circuit’s nationwide stay of the rule, but that stay may be affected by a pending Supreme Court case. The 2015 rule is also stayed in 13 states due to a North Dakota district court ruling. EPA and the Army are taking this action to provide certainty and consistency to the regulated community. “The Army, together with the Army Corps of Engineers, propose this rule with EPA to help continue to provide clarity and predictability to the regulated public during the rule making process. We are committed to implementing the Clean Water Act Section 404 regulatory program as transparently as possible for the regulated public,” said Mr. Ryan Fisher, Acting Assistant Secretary of the Army (Civil Works). This action follows the Feb. 28, 2017, Presidential Executive Order on “Restoring the Rule of Law, Federalism, and Economic Growth by Reviewing the ‘Waters of the United States’ Rule.” The February Order states that it is in the national interest to ensure that the nation’s navigable waters are kept free from pollution, while at the same time promoting economic growth, minimizing regulatory uncertainty, and showing due regard for the roles of Congress and the States under the Constitution. The agencies’ proposal is separate from the two-step process the agencies propose to take to reconsider the 2015 rule. The comment period for the Step 1 rule closed in September and the agencies are currently working to review the comments received from the public. The agencies are also in the process of holding listening sessions with stakeholders as we work to develop a proposed Step 2 rule that would revise the definition of “waters of the United States.” The agencies will be collecting public comment on this proposal for 21 days after publication in the Federal Register and plan to move quickly to take final action in early 2018. Additional information on this proposal and how to comment: http://www.epa.gov/wotus-rule. Source: AgriMarketing
Today, the Crop Science division of Bayer released results from an ...
Today, the Crop Science division of Bayer released results from an independent market research survey, revealing that the LibertyLink? system was the highest rated trait platform of the year.>
Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for two full-time with ...
Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for two full-time with benefits Propane/Fuel Delivery drivers. One position in the St. Paul area and one in the Gibbon area. CDL required and have to be able to obtain hazmat endorsement. Click here to apply: http://auroracoop.com/ContactUs>
The Future of Corn Traits and Stacks
Tim Dahl plunges a shovel into the soil to remove a firmly rooted cornstalk while checking root structure. “Hear those roots popping?” asks the Syngenta agronomic service representative. Even though this field is corn-on-corn, the corn’s root system is well protected by root-resistant traits and a soil-applied insecticide, he says. The field is this way on purpose, says the farmer who farms the field, Clint McGill from Albert Lea, Minnesota. McGill often rotates corn with soybeans to manage corn rootworm, but he also strip-tills corn-on-corn. Corn rootworm protection via traits has been a critical part of his program, particularly since a severe 2009 corn rootworm outbreak occurred in areas of southern Minnesota. “I use a combination of traits and a soil-applied insectide,” says McGill. “They’re good tools to have for managing rootworm.” Rootworm traits and stacks are just some of the myriad traits and stacks farmers have now and will have in the future. Also coming are new herbicide-tolerant stacks, with some microbial products tossed in. Here’s a look at what’s coming up. Corn rootworm-Resistant stacks SmartStax combines above-ground Bt traits (like European corn borer) and below-ground insect Bt traits (like corn rootworm) found in VT Triple Pro and Herculex Xtra products. It also confers tolerance to glyphosate (Roundup) and glufosinate (Liberty). Next up is SmartStax Pro, which Monsanto plans to fully launch later this decade, pending regulatory approval. SmartStax Pro stacks a new corn rootworm mode of action in an event called CRW III on top of existing SmartStax rootworm-resistant traits. Monsanto researchers used a new technology called RNA interference (RNAi) to create SmartStax Pro. It consists of a gene known as DVSNF7 inserted into a corn cell that instructs the plant to make a specific protein. This prevents a rootworm larvae from making a critical protein it needs to survive. “When we turn that off, it dies,” says Sean Evans, Monsanto technical development manager. “That works differently than does the stomach toxin with Bt.” Soybean herbicide stacks Roundup Ready 2 Xtend soybeans – with tolerance to glyphosate and dicamba – debuted in 2017. Monsanto also expects to launch a triple stack with tolerance to glyphosate, dicamba, and glufosinate (Liberty) by decade’s end, pending regulatory approval. The next decade will see soybean trait stacks developed with tolerance to: Glyphosate Dicamba Glufosinate HPPD inhibitors (a site of action to included in Callisto and Corvus herbicides) A yet undetermined additional mode of action. Monsanto is working with Sumitomo Chemical on an integrated system for PPO inhibitor (like Flexstar) herbicide tolerance that will fit with its multi-herbicide-tolerant trait stacked products. Commercialization is expected next decade. Balance Bean GT Soybean Performance System from Bayer Crop Science, MS Technologies, and Mertec LLC is waiting in the wings for a full commercial launch at presstime. Its trait has received all import approvals, with China having granted import approval earlier this year. However, the herbicide component of the Balance GT Soybean Performance System – Balance Bean – must be approved by the Environmental Protection Agency. Balance GT soybeans contain a trait that tolerates both glyphosate and isoxaflutole. Bayer Crop Science corn herbicides like Balance Flexx and Corvus contain isoxaflutole as an active ingredient. Isoxaflutole has an HPPD-inhibitor site of action, the same as mesotrione, the active ingredient in Callisto corn herbicide. Dow AgroScience’s Enlist Weed Control System is a go for corn in 2018. Soybeans, though, remain a stumbling block, as China and the European Union have not given approval. If Chinese and EU approval occurs, Dow plans to fully launch its Enlist and Enlist E3 soybeans in 2018. The Enlist Weed Control System confers herbicide tolerance to a new 2,4-D formulation – 2,4-D choline – and glyphosate in corn, soybeans, and cotton and fop herbicides in corn. Federal regulators have approved the herbicide portion of the system, Enlist Duo. It’s a mix of glyphosate and 2,4-D choline. Enlist soybeans and Enlist E3 soybeans tolerate 2,4-D choline, glyphosate, and glufosinate. Bayer Crop Science and Syngenta are developing a stack of mesotrione (Callisto), glufosinate (Liberty), and isoxaflutole (Balance) herbicides called MGI. Pending regulatory approval, it’s slated for a full commercial launch in 2019, says David Hollinrake, president of Syngenta Seeds and North America regional director. “That trait stack will be (for Syngenta) the foundation stack on top of other traits for proprietary genetics on soybeans,” says Hollinrake. Abiotic stressor stacks Insects and weeds have been the focal point for companies developing traits and trait stacks for corn and soybeans. They’re expanding their products toward more elusive plant stressors like intense heat, drought, or cold soils. Abiotic stressors trigger $200 billion in annual global crop losses, says Ian Jepson, who heads trait research and developmental biology for Syngenta Crop Protection. “Problems with abiotic stress will become more acute, particularly with the challenge of climate change and fresh water shortages,” says Jepson. One example of how Syngenta is developing products that can withstand abiotic stressors is its Agrisure Artesian hybrids. Syngenta touts these hybrids as increasing yields up to 15% over comparable hybrids under drought. Syngenta also has five traits in the late-research phase (commercialization is still a few years away) to help corn plants better use water. Changes farmers will see in the next several years won’t just include traits. Bayer Crop Science recently launched a new company with a Boston firm named Ginkgo Bioworks, which designs custom microbes in multiple markets including agriculture. Liam Condon, president of Bayer Crop Science, sees Ginkgo Bioworks as the rare deal that could be highly disruptive due to the impact it could have on the ability of microbes to improve the way legumes (like soybeans and peas) fix nitrogen. Bumping into all this development, however, are low commodity prices. Don’t give up, though. “Eventually, we will find the bottom, and then we are going to start the next cycle up in a market recovery,” says Richard Wilkins, a Greenwood, Delaware, farmer. “The best time to be experimenting and trying out new technologies is during times like these,” he says. Written by Gil Gullickson, Agriculture.com
Reviewing the U.S.-Korea Free Trade Agreement
While overshadowed by concerns about North Korea, trade discussions loomed large in President Trump's recent trip to Asia. Earlier statements from the Administration have raised concerns about the bilateral free trade agreement with South Korea. The South Korea-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (KORUS FTA) has substantial implications for U.S. agriculture and is reviewed in this article. Background In June 2006, the United States and the Republic of Korea began negotiating a bilateral trade agreement; negotiations concluded April 1, 2007, with an agreement signed on June 30th (citation). The agreement was considered the largest U.S. free trade agreement since the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). At first, the agreement was stalled in Congress over concerns about both the automobile sector and U.S. beef exports. A re-negotiated version provided additional time for the U.S. to lower tariffs on Korean cars and it was signed in December 2010 (citation). The final South Korea-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (KORUS) agreement was ratified by the U.S. Congress in late 2011 and went into force March 15, 2012. Figure 1 illustrates the timeline for the KORUS FTA. Among other things, KORUS FTA increased the number of goods that could enter Korea duty-free to 80 percent from 13 percent (USITC, 2013). The agreement also contained a number of market access commitments in the service sectors, and addressed non-tariff measures. It also included rules on labor, environment and competition policy (USITC, 2013). The United States is the chief agricultural exporter to South Korea, and South Korea is our sixth largest agricultural market (FAS, 2016). From 2002 through 2004, the United States exported an average of $2.6 billion per year of agricultural products to South Korea. By 2016, the value of these exports reached $5.69 billion dollars. The majority of agricultural products sold to South Korea are bulk commodities, such as corn, wheat and soybeans, but includes higher-valued agricultural products such as cattle hides, fruits and vegetables. Figures 2 and 3 illustrate U.S. agricultural exports to South Korea. Livestock Exports South Korea is the US beef industry's second-largest export market, comprising 17% of all U.S. beef exports (citation). The U.S. had been the largest beef exporter to Korea until mad cow disease was discovered in the U.S. herd in late 2003, resulting in Korea banning U.S. beef exports in 2004 (USITC 2013). The market reopened to U.S. beef exports in 2008, but exports lagged those from Australia, and faced a revitalized domestic Korean meat sector (Giamalva, 2013). Meat export trends are illustrated in figure 4. KORUS is helping increase U.S. competitiveness and allowing the industry to rebuild this important export market. Market access has improved. Beginning in 2012, Korea reduced its import tariff on U.S. beef by 2.7% each year for 15 years (USDA-FAS 2011; USDA-ERS, 2017). By 2017, the tariff, which had been at 40%, was down to 24% and is scheduled to be eliminated by 2026 (ibid). The tariff reduction and value of US beef exports are illustrated in figure 5. The U.S. Meat Export Federation had previously estimated that these tariff reductions would increase the value of U.S. beef exports to South Korea to more than $1 billion per year from its 2015 level of $810 million (Meat and Poultry, 2017). Under KORUS, exports were above $1 billion in 2016 on a volume of 169,000 metric tons (Beef Magazine, 2017). Growth in U.S. beef exports is led by chilled U.S. beef, which increased 55% from 2015 to 2016 to nearly 25,000 metric tons. U.S. exports of frozen beef also showed impressive growth, last year increasing over 2015 by 45% to an estimated 132,000 metric tons (ibid). This growth pushed the U.S. share of Korea's beef market to 42%, up from 35% in 2015 (BeefUSA 2017). For pork, the U.S. faces significant competition from the EU, Mexico, Canada and Chile in the Korean market (National Hog Farmer 2017). Korean tariffs have been reduced to zero as of 2016 on more than 90 percent of U.S. pork imports; a reduction from rates of 22.5% and 25% before KORUS. Duties on fresh pork bellies and other fresh cuts are subject to a safeguard tariff that will be phased down over 10 years, leading to unlimited duty-free access by 2023 (FAS 2011). In response, U.S. pork exports are expanding; exports increased by 31% in volume and 39% in value in the first quarter of 2017 (Feedstuffs, 2017). The value of US pork exports and the tariff rates are illustrated in figure 6. South Korea was the tenth-largest market for U.S. poultry and eggs, purchasing a total of $122 million in 2014 (USDA-Press Release, 2017)). Pursuant to KORUS, Korea has reduced import tariffs on eggs from 27% and they are scheduled to go to zero by 2024. Korean tariffs on imports of chicken will decline from the current 20% to zero between 2022 and 2024 (FAS 2011). Poultry and egg products to Korea were hampered, however, by an outbreak of bird flu earlier this year. Korea banned poultry and egg imports from the U.S. in March, but then lifted the ban in August (Polansek, 2017). Prior to the bird flu ban, egg imports had been growing at a rapid pace, in part due to South Korea's flock reductions due to its own incidents of bird flu. The KORUS agreement has also doubled the amount of access for U.S. dairy products. The tariff-rate quota established for cheese is growing at an annual rate of 3%, and tariffs over that quota amount are being eliminated for cheddar by 2022, and by all cheeses by 2027. The TRQ for evaporated milk and milk powder has an initial duty-free quantity of 5,000 tons, growing 3 percent annually in perpetuity. The agreement establishes a TRQ of 200 tons for butter and a TRQ of 700 tons for infant foods, with both of these quotas growing at 3 percent, and becoming duty free in 10 years (FAS 2011). As a result of these changes, South Korea is now the second largest market for US cheese after Mexico. U.S. cheese shipments to South Korea totaled nearly 94 million lbs. in 2016, about 15 percent of total U.S. cheese exports, and these exports are still growing, up 48 percent over the first half of 2017, compared to January-June 2016. The world's other three major cheese suppliers are Australia, the European Union (EU) and New Zealand. All three have free trade agreements with South Korea, raising concerns that a repeal of KORUS would have significantly negative impacts on the competitiveness of U.S. dairy exports (US Dairy Export Council 2017). Impact on Grains and Oilseeds Tariffs on Korea's imports of U.S. corn were set to zero immediately after KORUS went into effect. Although Korea already imported large quantities of feed corn at zero tariff under its autonomous quota before KORUS, Korea could legally discontinue the zero tariff at any time and revert back to the WTO tariff of 5 percent for the first 6.1 million tons, and 328 percent for any imports above this quantity; KORUS fixed the tariff at zero (FAS 2011). U.S. wheat for milling also received a zero tariff immediately after KORUS came into effect. Korea's imports of U.S. wheat were subject to a 1.8% WTO tariff or the autonomous Tariff-Rate Quota of 1 percent. Although this tariff reduction was small, it provided a comparative advantage relative to our primary wheat export competitors in Canada and Australia (FAS 2011). The USDA's Foreign Agricultural Service suggests that the greatest potential benefit for the US soybean sector is likely to come from improved access to Korea's 300,000-ton market for food quality soybeans. Under KORUS, Korea immediately eliminated its 5% tariff on food use soybeans. In addition, Korea established a tariff-rate quota for food-grade identity-preserved soybeans, used in the production of tofu. Prior to the agreement, imports of soybeans for soybean curd processing went through the state trading entity, which reportedly charged $250-per-ton markup on these soybean imports. Korean tariffs on soybeans for crushing have fallen to zero with the implementation of KORUS, and Korean tariffs on imports of crude soybean oil are falling from the pre-KORUS level of 5.4% to zero by 2022 (FAS 2011). The above numbers understate the effect of KORUS on grains and oilseeds. KORUS has also increased demand for U.S. livestock exports which themselves are a source of demand for corn, wheat and soybeans (farmdoc daily, March 23, 2017). As this review demonstrates, trade agreements like KORUS places U.S. agriculture on a competitive footing with other major agricultural exporters like Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the EU, all of whom now also have free trade agreements with South Korea. Terminating KORUS would risk U.S. producers being left behind in this growing market, with the potential for significant harm to the farm sector. References: American Farm Bureau Federation, "Implications of South Korea-U.S. Free Trade Agreement on U.S. Agriculture," Economic Analysis Team (Dec. 2014), available online: http://www.uskoreacouncil.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/AFBKORUSFTAReport.pdf John Giamalva, "Korea's Demand for U.S. Beef," U.S. International Trade Commission, Journal of International Commerce and Economics (January 2013), available online: https://www.usitc.gov/journals/KoreasDemandforUSBeef.pdf Paulson, N., K. Baylis, J. Coppess, and G. Schnitkey. "Another Look at Agricultural Trade: Direct and Indirect Corn Exports." farmdoc daily (7):53, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, March 23, 2017. Tom Polansek, "South Korea lifts ban on U.S. poultry, egg imports: USDA," Reuters, Health News (August 17, 2017), available online: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-birdflu-usa/south-korea-lifts-ban-on-u-s-poultry-egg-imports-usda-idUSKCN1AX2SH Statista.com, "Value of U.S. Agricultural Exports to South Korea from 2000 to 2016," available online: https://www.statista.com/statistics/221203/value-of-us-agricultural-exports-to-south-korea-since-2000/ U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Economic Research Service, "Animal Product Markets," (updated October 6, 2017), available online: https://www.ers.usda.gov/topics/international-markets-trade/countries-regions/south-korea/animal-product-markets/ U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Foreign Agricultural Service, "KORUS Fact Sheet," (March 2011) available online: https://www.fas.usda.gov/sites/development/files/korus_detailed_fact_sheet_03-11.pdf U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, "South Korea Lifts U.S. Poultry Ban," Press Release (August 17, 2017), available online: https://www.usda.gov/media/press-releases/2017/08/17/south-korea-lifts-us-poultry-ban U.S. International Trade Commission, "U.S.-Korea Free Trade Agreement: Effects on U.S. Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises," Investigation No. 332-539, Publication 4393 (May 2013), available online: https://www.usitc.gov/publications/332/pub4393.pdf Source: Kathy Baylis, Jonathan Coppess and Qianting Xie, Farmdocdaily
Harvest Pace Continues to Lag, Wheat Conditions Decline
Winter wheat conditions fell slightly from the previous week, according to USDA’s latest Crop Progress report released this week. USDA estimated that 54% of the winter wheat crop was rated good to excellent, down 1 percentage point from 55% the previous week. That resulted in a DTN Winter Wheat Condition Index of 137, down 3 points from the previous week. DTN’s index is down from 148 a year ago and is a little below the five-year average of 140, but is close enough to be considered neutral for winter wheat prices, said DTN Analyst Todd Hultman. Winter wheat progress was running at a near-average pace with USDA estimating 95% of the crop planted as of Sunday, up from 94% a year ago and even with the five-year average of 95% planted. Eighty-four percent of winter wheat was emerged, up from 83% a year ago and up from the five-year average of 83%. Corn harvest, on the other hand, continued to lag behind the average pace. USDA estimated that 83% of corn was harvested, down from 92% a year ago and also below the five-year average of 91% harvested. Indiana and Ohio, at 80% and 71% harvested respectively, were examples of wet conditions delaying harvest. “Monday’s harvest progress was neutral for corn prices,” Hultman said. Soybean harvest was also slightly behind the average pace at 93% complete, down from 96% a year ago and down from a five-year average of 95% harvested. “Monday’s report was neutral for soybeans,” Hultman said. Sorghum was 83% harvested, behind the five-year average of 87%. Cotton was 64% harvested nationwide, equal to the average pace. The following are highlights from weekly crop progress reports issued by National Ag Statistics Service offices in individual states. Colorado Harvest activities progressed last week despite wetter conditions. Isolated snow showers and rain were observed early in the week. Days suitable for fieldwork is 6.2 days, down slightly from the 6.3 days seen the previous week. Topsoil moisture is 2% very short, 17% short, 80% adequate and 1% surplus. Subsoil moisture is 6% very short, 20% short, 73% and 1% surplus. Corn harvested is 72% with 86% the five-year average. Sorghum harvested is 77% with 79% the five-year average. Winter wheat emerged is 94% with 96% the five-year average. Winter wheat crop condition is 9% very poor to poor, 21% fair and 70% good to excellent. Illinois Cooler temperatures and some rainfall were common across the state last week. There were 4.6 days suitable for fieldwork during the week ending November 12. Statewide, the average temperature was 37.3 degrees, 5.7 degrees below normal. Precipitation averaged 0.47 inch, 0.24 inch below normal. Topsoil moisture supply was rated at 9% short, 84% adequate, and 7% surplus. Subsoil moisture supply was rated at 6% very short, 18% short, 74% adequate, and 2% surplus. Corn harvested for grain was 90% complete, compared to 96% for the five-year average. Soybean harvest was 95% complete, compared to 99% last year. Winter wheat planted was at 95%, compared to 95% last year. Winter wheat emerged was at 85%, compared to 78% for the five-year average. Winter wheat condition was rated 7% very poor, 8% poor, 31% fair, 41% good, and 13% excellent. Indiana Rain this week has continued to slow down harvest, tillage, and manure spreading. There were 3.2 days available for field work last week. More wet conditions throughout the week kept farmers out of the fields, but subfreezing temperatures in the mornings reportedly helped operators gain traction and keep harvesting once the rain stopped falling. Days suitable for fieldwork was at 3.2 days, up from the 2.9 days seen in the previous week. Topsoil moisture is 0% very short, 2% short, 53% adequate and 45% surplus. Subsoil moisture is 0% very short, 5% short, 65% adequate and 30% surplus. Corn harvested for grains is 71% with the five-year average of 85%. Soybeans harvested 93% with the five-year average 95%. Winter wheat planted is 97% with 99% the five-year average. Winter wheat emerged is 90% with 86% being the five-year average. Winter wheat crop condition is 1% very poor to poor, 11% fair and 88% good to excellent. Iowa Limited precipitation last week allowed an average of 6.0 days suitable for fieldwork statewide. Harvest has begun to wind down as many Iowa farmers were able to work in their fields throughout the week. Additional fieldwork activities this past week included baling corn stalks, tillage, applying fertilizers and manure, tiling, seeding CRP and hauling grain. Topsoil moisture levels rated 3% very short, 10% short, 83% adequate and 4% surplus. Subsoil moisture levels rated 6% very short, 17% short, 74% adequate and 3% surplus. Eighty-five percent of the corn for grain crop has been harvested, one week behind last year and the five-year average. Moisture content of corn being harvested for grain averaged 17%. Only northwest and north central Iowa have 90% or more of their corn for grain crop harvested. Ninety-seven percent of the soybean crop has been harvested, equal to last year but five days behind average. Kansas Temperatures averaged 8 to 10 degrees below normal last week. Fog and drizzle hampered harvest progress in some areas, but rainfall totals remained at or near zero throughout the entire state. There were 6.0 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture rated 4% very short, 23% short, 72% adequate, and 1% surplus. Subsoil moisture rated 3% very short, 23% short, 73% adequate, and 1% surplus. Winter wheat condition rated 3% very poor, 9% poor, 32% fair, 50% good, and 6% excellent. Winter wheat planted was 97%, equal to last year, and near 99% for the five-year average. Emerged was 84%, behind 90% last year and 91% average. Corn harvested was 93%, behind 99% last year, and near 96% average. Soybeans harvested was 91%, near 93% last year, and equal to average. Sorghum harvested was 77%, behind 90% last year and 84% average. Cotton condition rated 0% very poor, 3% poor, 26% fair, 61% good, and 10% excellent. Cotton harvested was 25%, behind 33% last year and 41% average. Michigan There were 3.8 days suitable for fieldwork in Michigan last week. Snow accumulation in some northern Michigan locations restricted harvest activities. Farther south, slightly drier conditions allowed some producers to recommence harvesting on certain fields. Days suitable for fieldwork was 3.8 days, up from the previous week’s 2.9 days. Topsoil moisture is 0% very short, 0% short, 66% adequate and 34% surplus. Subsoil moisture is 2% very short, 5% short, 72% adequate and 21% surplus. Corn harvested for grain is 69% with five-year average at 70. Soybeans harvested is 88% with 92% the five-year average. Winter wheat planted is 99% with the five-year average of 98%. Winter wheat emerged is 93% with 88% the five-year average. Winter wheat crop condition is 6% very poor to poor, 15% fair and 79% good to excellent. Minnesota Minnesota farmers took full advantage of the 4.7 days suitable for fieldwork and harvested 19% of the statewide corn acreage last week. Other field activities included baling corn stalks, moving cattle off pasture, spreading fertilizer, and working on fall tillage. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 0% very short, 2% short, 84% adequate and 14% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 1% very short, 6% short, 82% adequate and 11% surplus. Corn for grain harvest advanced 19 percentage points, but remained 12 days behind the five-year average, bringing the total harvest to 79% complete. Corn moisture content of grain at harvest averaged 18%. The sunflower harvest was 93% complete, four days ahead of last year’s pace. Missouri Cool temperatures and dry weather were prevalent again across the state last week. Statewide, the temperature averaged 42.6 degrees, 3.0 degrees below normal. Precipitation averaged 0.26 inch statewide, 0.49 inch below normal. There were 5.4 days suitable for fieldwork last week. Topsoil moisture supply was rated 5% very short, 19% short, 72% adequate, and 4% surplus. Subsoil moisture supply was rated 5% very short, 23% short, 70% adequate, and 2% surplus. Corn harvested for grain was 92% complete, compared to 96% for the five-year average. Soybean harvest was 86% complete, up 9 percentage points from last week. Cotton harvest was 92% complete, compared to 83% for the five-year average. Sorghum harvest was 90% complete. Winter wheat planted reached 83%, up 14 percentage points from last week. Winter wheat emerged reached 63%. Winter wheat condition was rated 57% good to excellent. Nebraska Temperatures averaged 4 to 10 degrees below normal. Precipitation was limited across the State. Dry weather continued to allow good progress on corn harvest. There were 6.6 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 3% very short, 21% short, 74% adequate, and 2% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 5% very short, 19% short, 75% adequate, and 1% surplus. Corn harvested was 86%, behind 92% last year, and near 90% for the five-year average. Winter wheat condition rated 63% good to excellent. Winter wheat emerged was 95%, near 98% both last year and average. Sorghum harvested was 85%, behind 96% last year and 93% average. North Dakota Snow and very cold temperatures delayed corn and sunflower harvest last week. Livestock producers were busy moving cattle back to the farmstead for the winter and weaning calves. Temperatures across the state averaged 8 to 20 degrees below normal. There were 5.4 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture supplies rated 11% very short, 30% short, 57% adequate, and 2% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies rated 14% very short, 28 short, 56 adequate, and 2 surplus. Corn harvested was 76%, behind 83 last year and 85 for the five-year average. Winter wheat condition rated 29% good to excellent. Winter wheat emerged was 94%, near 96% last year. Sunflowers harvested was 81%, near 84% last year and 78% average. Ohio Rain this week has continued to slow down harvest, tillage, and manure spreading. There were 3.2 days available for field work last week. More wet conditions throughout the week kept farmers out of the fields, but subfreezing temperatures in the mornings reportedly helped operators gain traction and keep harvesting once the rain stopped falling. Average grain moisture for corn harvested was 19% and soybean moisture was 13%. Heavy amounts of rain fall impacted much of the state and hit especially hard in southern parts of the state. The heavy rains submerged low-lying areas of fields and left farmers with little time to get into the fields in those areas. Winter wheat that was recently planted into hillsides was reportedly washed away in affected areas due to extraordinary rain events. Hay was being fed to livestock as pasture growth has stopped for the season. Topsoil moisture was rated 0% very short, 2% short, 53% adequate and 45% surplus. Subsoil moisture was rated 0% very short, 5% short, 65% adequate and 30% surplus. Corn harvested for grain was rated 71%, up from 60% last week. Soybeans harvested was rated 93%, up from 90% last week. Winter wheat planted reached 97%, compared to 94% last week. Winter wheat emerged reached 90%. Winter Wheat was rated 88% good to excellent. Oklahoma Oklahoma experienced another relatively dry week with the highest precipitation totals recorded in the southeast district at 0.21 inch. As of Nov. 7, drought conditions were rated 8% moderate to exceptional, up 5 points from the previous week but down 29 points from the previous year. Statewide, temperatures averaged in the mid-50s. Topsoil moisture was rated 3% very short, 40% short and 57% adequate. Subsoil moisture was rated 2% very short, 32% short and 66% adequate. Winter wheat planted reached 93%, down 4 points from normal. Winter wheat emerged reached 86%, down 3 points from normal. Corn harvested reached 95%, down 3 points from normal. Sorghum harvested reached 80%, down 5 points from normal. Soybeans harvested reached 75%, up 3 points from normal. Cotton harvested reached 48%, down 5 points from the previous year and down 7 points from normal. South Dakota Many producers across the state completed fall harvest following a mostly dry week. Temperatures were below average for most locations. However, minimal precipitation allowed continued progress in corn, sunflower and sorghum harvests, in addition to completing fall fertilizer applications. There were 6.2 days suitable for fieldwork. Topsoil moisture supplies were rated 17% very short, 23% short, 58% adequate and 2% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies were rated 23% very short, 27% short, 49% adequate and 1% surplus. Corn harvested was 82%, behind 90% for both last year and the five-year average. Winter wheat condition was rated 14% good to excellent. Sorghum harvested was 83%, behind 98% last year and 92% average. Texas Most of the state experienced cooler temperatures last week. Rainfall ranged from 0.5 inch to 1.5 inches in east Texas, the Blacklands, the Cross Timbers, and the Southern Plains. Most of the rest of the state recorded trace amounts of precipitation up to half an inch. Statewide, topsoil moisture was rated 6% very short, 35% short, 53% adequate and 6% surplus. Subsoil moisture was rated 9% very short, 29% short, 57% adequate and 5% surplus. Corn was 95% harvested, near the average of 96%. Cotton was 55% harvested, slightly ahead of the average of 53%. Sorghum was 91% harvested, ahead of the average of 87%. Soybeans were 83% harvested, even with the average. Winter wheat was 89% planted, ahead of the average of 87%, and emerged was 78%, also ahead of the average of 73% emerged. Winter wheat condition was rated 46% good to excellent. Wisconsin Temperatures were well below normal last week, with overnight lows falling into the low teens and single digits. Precipitation was light and fell mostly as snow in northern Wisconsin. In spite of the dry weather, overcast skies, cold temperatures and local snow cover kept grain moisture high. The ground was reportedly beginning to freeze in some areas, allowing access to soft fields but hampering tillage and manure incorporation. Reporters commented that corn yields were better than expected. Statewide, topsoil moisture supplies were rated 7% short, 85% adequate and 8% surplus. Subsoil moisture supplies were rated 1% very short, 7% short, 86% adequate and 6% surplus. Corn harvested for grain was 56% complete, 11 days behind the average. The moisture content of corn harvested for grain averaged 21%. Soybean harvest was reported at 92% complete, seven days behind last year and five days behind the average. Winter wheat emerged was reported at 92% complete, four days ahead of last year. Winter wheat condition was reported 85% good to excellent, 2 percentage points below last week. Source: DTN
Is Palmer Amaranth Developing Traits That Make it Difficult to Control?
Palmer amaranth is widely considered to be one of the most damaging and difficult to control agricultural weeds in North America. A lot of time and attention has been devoted to herbicide-resistant Palmer amaranth and the significant yield losses it can produce. Research featured in the Weed Science, though, shows other “life history” traits may be contributing to crop losses by making Palmer amaranth more aggressive and difficult to control. Researchers from the University of Florida collected samples of Palmer amaranth from 10 fields in Florida and Georgia. The sites had widely divergent cropping histories – from short-statured vegetables and peanut crops to tall corn and cotton crops. The fields also varied in herbicide use. Some were devoted to organic production, while others had a history of intensive herbicide use. Significant differences were observed in the traits of the Palmer amaranth from the various fields, such as fresh and dry weight, days to flowering, plant height, leaf shape and canopy. Researchers say these differences could not be explained by whether the Palmer amaranth population was glyphosate resistant or glyphosate susceptible. Instead, crop rotation and crop canopy better explained the many variations found. For example, the tallest populations of Palmer amaranth came from corn fields, while the shortest came from fields planted with the shortest crops. “It appears Palmer amaranth can evolve life-history traits that increase its potential to grow and reproduce in various cropping systems,” says Ramon Leon, Ph.D., a member of the research team. “To avoid the development of more aggressive weed biotypes, it is important to consider these evolutionary consequences when designing crop rotation systems and weed management strategies.” Source: Weed Science Society of America
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Come by and see us at the Gateway Farm Expo in Kearney!
Come by and see us at the Gateway Farm Expo in Kearney!>
Crediting Soil Nitrogen in Wheat Can Cut Costs Without Cutting Yield
One of the foremost questions on many wheat producers’ minds this year is “Will I make any money on wheat?” While it is true wheat prices are down and many budgets are in the red, there are some steps that can be taken to improve the chances of staying in the black. One of those steps is soil sampling and crediting soil nutrients. In this article we will focus on nitrogen. Soil sampling is a basic, but proven technology that can reliably reduce fertilizer applications. There have been studies done in Texas on cotton, corn and sorghum showing the benefits of crediting soil nitrates, but little data on the amount or depth one can credit soil N for winter wheat in Texas. This credit can be accurately calculated through a deep profile soil test (up to 24”). A study conducted in 2016-2017 showed no significant yield differences between the control (no crediting) and crediting down to 24” inches at all study sites (Figure 1). In fact, wheat yield did not respond to increasing nitrogen applications in two of the three sites. This, combined with additional nitrogen found at 36” and 48” depths suggests wheat will even utilize nitrogen from below 24”. Test weight was also the highest at all sites when crediting down to 24”. Based on this information, producers could save a significant amount of fertilizer cost by soil sampling and crediting nitrate nitrogen already in the soil. There was approximately 21, 40, and 30 lb N/a in the top 24” of soil at Leonard, McGregor, and Vernon, respectively. Assuming nitrogen costs $0.34/lb, a producer would have saved between $714 and $1360 on a 100 acre field, minus the cost of soil sampling, which runs $10/sample for a routine analysis that includes nitrate nitrogen at the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory. If your previous crop was not harvested due to a crop failure (e.g., stand establishment issues or hail damage), which is often observed in the Rolling Plains, there is a high possibility that the N was not fully utilized by the crop and may still remain in the soil. Of course, a soil test is the only way to know if these savings are possible on your farm. For more information on proper soil sampling please visit: http://varietytesting.tamu.edu/files/wheat/docs/fertility/Testing%20Your%20Soil%20-%20How%20to%20Collect%20and%20Send%20Samples.pdf. Source: Texas AgriLife Extension
National
LibertyLink ranked highest soybean trait platform for 2017
A product manager with Bayer says a recent independent market research study revealed its LibertyLink was the highest rated soybean this year among growers surveyed. About 500 growers in 21 states were surveyed on their seed trait decisions and what they think of existing traits on the market. He tells Brownfield?the survey revealed that weed control is the main reason farmers select the product. “Really just phenomenal results across difficult to control weeds, resistant weeds, and the core driver weeds: marestail, water hemp, palmer,” he says. Continue reading LibertyLink ranked highest soybean trait platform for 2017 at Brownfield Ag News.      
A quieter Heartland pattern ahead next week
Precipitation will subside Friday across the western U.S., but significant rain and high-elevation snow will return to northern California and the Northwest late in the weekend and early next week. Five-day precipitation totals could reach 1 to 3 inches in the northern and central Rockies and 2 to 8 inches in northern California and the Pacific Northwest. Farther east, a fast-moving cold front could result in 1- to 2-inch rainfall totals, starting later Friday, from the eastern Corn Belt into New England. Continue reading A quieter Heartland pattern ahead next week at Brownfield Ag News.      
LibertyLink ranked 2017?s highest soybean trait platform for 2017
A product manager with Bayer says a recent independent market research study revealed its LibertyLink was the highest rated soybean this year among growers surveyed. About 500 growers in 21 states were surveyed on their seed trait decisions and what they think of existing traits on the market. He tells Brownfield?the survey revealed that weed control is the main reason farmers select the product. “Really just phenomenal results across difficult to control weeds, resistant weeds, and the core driver weeds: marestail, water hemp, palmer,” he says. Continue reading LibertyLink ranked 2017?s highest soybean trait platform for 2017 at Brownfield Ag News.      
Chinn says other dicamba labels coming soon
Missouri?s agriculture director expects more special use labels on dicamba products to be finalized soon ? following the special label for BASF?s Engenia herbicide for 2018, ?We?re still working on finalizing labels for Xtendimax and Fexapan but we HAVE finished the Engenia label. So, the first requirement we?re going to have it?s going to be an extended use pesticide and that?s the same as what EPA has. However, we?re going to change it a little bit by requiring everybody who applies it must be a certified applicator.? Missouri will have special cut off dates for application of Engenia, Chinn tells Brownfield, based on the timing of dicamba drift damage in 2017. Continue reading Chinn says other dicamba labels coming soon at Brownfield Ag News.      
New Michigan law prohibits food tax
A new bill signed into law by Michigan?s governor will prohibit local governments from taxing food manufacturing, distribution, or retail sale. Michigan Farm Bureau Legislative Counsel Rebecca Park says Michigan House Bill 4999 will protect farmers and families from the negative impacts food taxes would have on the economy, and promote agriculture and the value-added processing the state offers. “When you talk about that global competition, one small change in an area, particularly revolving around taxation, could have a big impact on the type of commodities that farmers are able to grow and be productive and profitable in,” she says. Continue reading New Michigan law prohibits food tax at Brownfield Ag News.      
Cattle futures lower ahead of On Feed report
Chicago Mercantile Exchange cattle futures ended the day and the week lower.? Feeder cattle futures are under aggressive pressure from Friday?s higher move in corn.? A lot of today?s activity was position squaring ahead of this afternoon?s Cattle on Feed report.? Today?s report brought another round of large placements.? While the market has been able to power through recent negative reports, that could change with the already lower trend in cattle prices. ?December live cattle closed $.70 lower at $118.85 and February live cattle closed $.45 lower at $124.67. ? Continue reading Cattle futures lower ahead of On Feed report at Brownfield Ag News.      
BASF says Engenia a success, more training for 2018
BASF officials worked with Missouri on that state?s newly released regulations for use of the company?s dicamba product next year and say they are working with all other states where it will be used. Scott Kay, Vice President of BASF crop protection, tells reporters that volatility of the product is NOT one of the causes of off-target movement, ?Based on our research and experience. It?s important to note that a number of growers did have an excellent and positive results last year.? Weed scientists, however, continue to say volatility IS one of the causes of all the dicamba low-volatility products. Continue reading BASF says Engenia a success, more training for 2018 at Brownfield Ag News.      
Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: November 17, 2017
Dec. corn closed at $3.43,?up 6 and 1/2?cents Jan. soybeans closed at $9.90 and 1/2,?up 18?and?1/2?cents Dec. soybean meal closed at $318.20,?up $7.70 Dec. soybean oil closed at 34.44,?up 1?point Dec. wheat closed at $4.27 and 1/4,?up?5 and?3/4?cents Dec. live cattle closed at $118.85,?down?70?cents Dec. lean hogs closed at $60.65,?up 55 cents Dec. Continue reading Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: November 17, 2017 at Brownfield Ag News.      
October cattle placements jump 10%
The number of cattle in U.S. feedlots continues to grow. The USDA says that during October 2017, placements into feedlots were up 10% from October 2016 at 2.393 million head, supported by mostly higher cash prices last month and cheaper feed costs. More than half of those cattle weighed less than 800 pounds and will be marketed from April through September 2018. By weight, placements of cattle weighing less than 600 pounds were 675,00 head, with 600 to 699 pounders at 590,000 head and 700 to 799 pound placements at 510,00 head, while 800 to 899 pound placements were 368,000 head, 900 to 999 pound placements were 160,000 head, and placements of cattle weighing more than 1,000 pounds were 90,000 head. Continue reading October cattle placements jump 10% at Brownfield Ag News.      
Farm Bureau survey indicates lower cost in Thanksgiving dinner
Lower prices for turkey, milk, rolls, and sweet potatoes have resulted in a decrease in the American Farm Bureau Federation?s Thanksgiving Dinner Survey. John Newton, AFBF?s director of market intelligence, says the informal survey shows the cost of food items for a Thanksgiving dinner for 10 people was around $49, the lowest it has been since 2013. He says the turkey, which is about 50 percent of the cost of the items in the survey, was lower this year at $22. Continue reading Farm Bureau survey indicates lower cost in Thanksgiving dinner at Brownfield Ag News.      
Blumenauer?s Farm Bill Folly
While the House debated and approved this week the first legislative package to reform the federal tax system since 1986, and the Senate Finance Committee kicked forward its version of the same tax reform, Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D, OR) convened ?A Call for Reform: Fix the Farm Bill.? The forum was effectively a press conference for unveiling his ?Food & Farm Act,? Blumenauer?s vision for what omnibus farm policy legislation would look like if he were king for a day. Continue reading Blumenauer’s Farm Bill Folly at Brownfield Ag News.      
Midday cash livestock markets
Direct cash cattle trade has been quiet and it looks like the bulk of trade has been completed for the week.? However ? there could be a little cleanup trade yet this afternoon. Boxed beef is mixed at the midday on light to moderate box movement.? Choice is $1.68 lower at $208.56 and Select is $1.04 higher at $188.87.? The Choice/Select spread is $19.69. At the Ogallala Livestock Auction in Nebraska compared to two weeks ago lightweight steer calves were mostly steady, heavier weight steer calves were $2.00 to $4.00 lower.? Continue reading Midday cash livestock markets at Brownfield Ag News.      
70th Annual Indiana Poultry Donation
Brownfield?s Amie Sites will be on the ground for the 70th Annual Indiana Poultry Donation at the Indiana Statehouse in Indianapolis on November 20, 2017. Continue reading 70th Annual Indiana Poultry Donation at Brownfield Ag News.      
Iowa program offers crop insurance premium reduction for cover crop use
The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship (IDALS) has announced a new program aimed at increasing acres of cover crops in the state. Iowa farmers who plant cover crops this fall may be eligible for a five dollar per acre premium reduction on their crop insurance in 2018. IDALS worked with the USDA’s Risk Management Agency (RMA), which oversees the federal crop insurance program, to establish a three-year demonstration project aimed at expanding the usage of cover crops in Iowa. Continue reading Iowa program offers crop insurance premium reduction for cover crop use at Brownfield Ag News.      
Missouri releases BASF Engenia restrictions for 2018
The Missouri Department of Agriculture has set use restrictions for BASF?s dicamba herbicide, Engenia*, for 2018. Ag Director Chris Chinn says the regulations are based on input from growers, researchers, industry partners, and farm groups. Engenia will be for sale to and use ONLY by certified applicators. Training through the University of Missouri Extension is required. The product cannot be applied before 7:30 a.m. or after 5:30 p.m. Continue reading Missouri releases BASF Engenia restrictions for 2018 at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
Weekend update: wheat, soybeans, and corn
Wheat joined the party on Friday with corn and beans, but can they continue to gain strength in the holiday week?
Combines Sold at Auction in November - List of Prices
Machinery Pete provides list of auction sale prices on Combines so far in November 2017
Weekend update: Soybeans & Corn
Soybeans accelerated higher on Friday, is it sustainable?
John Deere 4760 Tractor Sold for Record Price Today on Indiana Auction
1992 John Deere 4760 tractor with only 484 hours, owned by a local Doctor, sold for $85,500, a new record high auction price, today on a central Indiana auction. Sale by Ted Everett Equipment
The Farm Journal AgTech Expo in Indianapolis Dec. 11?13 will feature a
The Farm Journal AgTech Expo in Indianapolis Dec. 11?13 will feature a ?Startup Station? where top startup teams will make pitches and get feedback from farmers on the viability of their new offerings.
Weekend update: Corn
Corn and beans managed to rally on Friday, can that continue into next week?
Gulke: Surprising Uptick after Negative USDA Report
Jerry Gulke, president of the Gulke Group and Farm Journal’s Pam Fretwell discussed the events that helped the market to recover such as in the case for soybeans, a positive close for the week after a poor start.
Hammer-Time
I'm still learning how to disassemble and re-assemble things.
The 14th largest cow-calf operation in the U.S. is getting out of the
The 14th largest cow-calf operation in the U.S. is getting out of the cattle business to concentrate on citrus growing.
November 2017 Cattle on Feed Report
Analysis of the November 2017 Cattle on Feed Report.
China Tops Canada As Lead Buyer of U.S. Ag Goods
Tensions are rising when it comes to the future of trade. As leaders from Canada, Mexico and the United States are in the midst of round 5 of North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) 2.0 negotiations, new numbers from U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) show China is now the top buyer of U.S. agricultural goods.
Corn Looking for Value
The market has received more signs of the low-quality soybean crop.