@C - CORN - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Sep '17 375'4 371'0 374'0 -5'6
Dec '17 389'2 384'6 387'2 -6'2
Mar '18 400'2 395'6 398'4 -6'0
May '18 405'4 401'0 403'0 -6'4
Jul '18 410'0 405'6 408'4 -5'6
Sep '18 410'4 408'0 408'2 -6'2
@S - SOYBEANS - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Aug '17 1000'4 985'6 992'6 -16'2
Sep '17 1005'2 990'6 998'0 -16'2
Nov '17 1013'4 998'2 1005'4 -16'6
Jan '18 1023'0 1007'0 1013'6 -17'0
Mar '18 1024'4 1010'4 1017'4 -16'0
May '18 1029'0 1015'2 1022'0 -15'4
Jul '18 1032'0 1021'4 1028'2 -15'4
@K - HARD RED WINTER WHEAT - KCBT
Month High Low Last Chg
Sep '17 493'2 486'4 488'6 -7'2
Dec '17 520'0 513'0 515'2 -7'4
Mar '18 537'0 530'4 532'0 -8'0
May '18 550'0 544'4 545'0 -7'6
@L - LIVE CATTLE - CME
Month High Low Last Chg
Aug '17 117.375 115.800 116.425 0.550
Oct '17 118.375 116.850 117.400 0.325
@C - COTTON #2 - ICEFU
Month High Low Last Chg
Oct '17 69.35 69.35 69.35 0.21
Dec '17 68.90 68.02 68.15 -0.27
Mar '18 68.60 67.74 67.74 -0.37
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National
Renk Seeds Field Day
Brownfield Anchor/Reporter Larry Lee will be on the ground in Sun Prairie, Wisconsin on August 22 for Renk Seeds Field Day. Continue reading Renk Seeds Field Day at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
Application Period Starts Wednesday for Louisiana Farm Flood Grants
Louisiana farmers who lost at least $10,000 because of last year's floods can get federal grants to cover up to $100,000 in such losses, and the application period begins Wednesday.
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Big shoutout to our Ag Aviation crew! Great article on the industry!
Big shoutout to our Ag Aviation crew! Great article on the industry!>
>
Futures on the open are lower as rain is falling across northern Iowa ...
Futures on the open are lower as rain is falling across northern Iowa and Southern Minnesota. The radar is also indicating a shot of rain in Southern Ohio this morning. The debate of how much actual coverage these rains are dropping is being debated but the market is taking profits on length. The Cattle on Feed report will be released this afternoon and the market is looking for higher placements, on feed, and marketing?s versus last year. The Commitment of Traders report will also be released this afternoon. Funds were net buyers mid-week this week. On the Open at 8:30 a.m., Corn down 7, Soybeans 6 lower. KC &Chi Wheat near unchanged while Mpls Wheat is 4 lower. Enjoy the weekend!>
Weather and exports are the main drivers of this morning?s higher ...
Weather and exports are the main drivers of this morning?s higher trade action. Weekly export sales for corn were almost 2 times better than last week. Beans were up 80% from last week. All wheat was up 87% from LW. Traders will be watching for confirmation of needed rainfall across Western Iowa. Tomorrows Cattle on Feed report is expected to show July 1 at 102.9%, June placements at 106.1% and June Marketings at 104.7%. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn +5 to +6, Soybeans +7 to +8, KC Wheat 2 lower. Crude oil +.40c/brl.>
Southern Rust has been confirmed in Cass, Fillmore and York counties ...
Southern Rust has been confirmed in Cass, Fillmore and York counties in Nebraska.>
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Josh Dexter from Wood River talks about the different pests he is ...
Josh Dexter from Wood River talks about the different pests he is seeing in the fields and what farmer-owners can do to curb any more yield damage. #YourYieldTour #YourYieldsMatter #YourYieldsYourFields>
Southern rust has been confirmed by @UNLPlantClinic in eastern ...
Southern rust has been confirmed by @UNLPlantClinic in eastern Nebraska corn. Be on the lookout and continue to scout your fields. #YourYieldsMatter>
Dawn Caldwell, Head of Government Affairs brings you your GOVERNMENT ...
Dawn Caldwell, Head of Government Affairs brings you your GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS ? UPDATE JULY 17, 2017.>
USDA Crop Progress report for the week ending July 16, 2017.
USDA Crop Progress report for the week ending July 16, 2017.>
#KeepingItLocal
#KeepingItLocal>
Fungicide application is incredibly important during this time of the ...
Fungicide application is incredibly important during this time of the season to stop these yield robbing diseases! #YourYieldsMatter #YourYieldsYourFields>
Early weather forecasts to start the week look a bit drier, but most ...
Early weather forecasts to start the week look a bit drier, but most of Iowa is expected to see rainfall on Wednesday or Thursday of this week. Condition ratings will be out this afternoon at 3 p.m. by the USDA and most across the Corn Belt are saying the crops are looking a touch better. As pollination is well under way right now, the marketplace will be watching crop progress and weather very closely. If the expected rain mid-week doesn?t develop, the marketplace could get nervous very quickly. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn down 1 to 2, soybeans up 3 to 4, KC Wheat down 4. Crude oil off 13 cents a barrel.>
Derek Bailey out of the Harvard location stresses the importance of ...
Derek Bailey out of the Harvard location stresses the importance of fungicide after finding bacterial leaf streak in an area field. #YourYieldTour #YourYieldsMatter #YourYieldsYourFields>
"I grew up in the small town of Soldier, Kansas where we lived close ...
"I grew up in the small town of Soldier, Kansas where we lived close to my grandparents who were dairy farmers. My childhood was cluttered with activities such as music, church, horses, sports and spending time on my grandparent?s farm." Click on the link below to read more about Celie! #KeepingItLocal>
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Big shoutout to our Ag Aviation crew! Great article on the industry!
Big shoutout to our Ag Aviation crew! Great article on the industry!>
>
Nebraska Ag Update - July 21, 2017
Nebraska Ag Updates
Programs Available for Nebraska Farmers and Ranchers Suffering from Drought Conditions
LINCOLN - The Nebraska Department of Agriculture (NDA) is providing information to Nebraska?s farmers and ranchers in need of assistance due to prolonged dry conditions in the state.
Drought-stressed Canola Possible Forage for Livestock
Drought stress has caused early flower abortion in canola fields in portions of the North Dakota, so canola may provide an alternate forage option for drought-stricken livestock producers. “Livestock producers facing forage shortages may be able to feed their cows canola, provided they take certain precautions,” says Miranda Meehan, North Dakota State University Extension Service livestock environmental stewardship specialist. “While canola makes palatable feed, it may take one or two days for cattle to become accustomed to the taste.” Forage rapeseed (canola) has a nutrient content that’s similar to alfalfa, with crude protein of 12 to 14 percent and total digestible nutrients (energy) of 55 to 60 percent. Crude protein and energy levels will be higher if the crop is cut in the early podded stage rather than after the lower leaves begin to drop. “Nutritional quality can vary, so producers should have a feed analysis on the forage they plan to use to determine actual nutrient values,” advises Carl Dahlen, NDSU Extension beef cattle specialist. Feeding canola forage creates some risks; bloat and scours can be a concern, and elevated levels of sulfur and nitrates are possible. To reduce bloat and scours issues, acclimate cattle during a period of time and blend the canola with other feeds so canola hay or silage is less than 50 percent of the total feed intake. Sulfur levels in canola can range from 0.5 to 1.3 percent on a dry-matter basis. “Combining high sulfur from canola with high sulfur from byproducts such as distillers grains can be even more problematic, and producers are encouraged to keep total dietary sulfur below 0.4 percent on a dry-matter basis,” says Janna Kincheloe, area Extension livestock systems specialist at NDSU’s Hettinger Research Extension Center. Feeding sulfur above this threshold can result in hemolytic anemia, interference with livestock’s use of the trace minerals copper and selenium, and polioencephalomalacia (PEM). Clinical signs of PEM include a lack of muscle coordination, facial tremors, teeth clenching, circling, stupor and cortical blindness, followed by animals leaning or lying, convulsions and death. “Drought stress in canola also can lead to accumulation of nitrates in the plants, which warrants caution when devising feeding plans,” says Kevin Sedivec, NDSU Extension rangeland management specialist. “Producers also need to be aware of any withdrawal periods associated with pesticides or herbicides that were applied to the standing plants.” See the NDSU publication “Nitrate Poisoning of Livestock” (http://tinyurl.com/NitratePoisoning) for more information about elevated concentrations of nitrates in feedstuffs. Another issue producers should be concerned about is green canola regrowth that was subjected to moisture stress during the summer because it can be toxic to grazing animals, including cattle and sheep. Researchers don’t know the exact type of toxin causing the problem, but Australian sheep growers have reported an unidentified toxin has resulted in sheep losses. If canola is hayed, drying time is critical to avoid moldy feed later, according to Meehan. Typically, the plants take four to six days to dry to proper moisture levels (16 to 18 percent moisture content) for baling. Canola tends to turn dark as it cures, but this shouldn’t affect palatability. Dahlen notes that cattle may resist eating stemmy canola forage. Using a roller mower conditioner to smash stems will help reduce drying time and improve consumption. Kincheloe says a better option may be to ensile the canola if it is leafy and has some height, although canola is high in moisture (75 to 80 percent), and wilting it to 65 percent moisture will take time. Harvesting a mixture of the mature stand and the regrowth will reduce the moisture, and crimping will hasten the drying process. Seepage and ensiling problems may occur if canola is ensiled at moisture contents greater than 70 percent. Sedivec advises producers to follow these recommendations for safely introducing livestock to canola hay or silage: Introduce canola hay or silage slowly by replacing a part of the diet for several days. Have other types of forage available for cattle in confinement for the first two weeks as canola is being introduced. Test hay or silage for concentrations of sulfur and nitrates, and formulate rations or design feeding schemes to reduce the consequences of risky feed components. Source: North Dakota State University 
Significant Fertilizer Movement as Applications Wrap Up
For the second straight week, retail fertilizer prices are showing significant movement after five months of holding mostly steady, according to fertilizer retailers surveyed by DTN. Prices for all eight of the major fertilizers were lower the second week of July 2017 compared to a month earlier. As the fertilizer application season wraps up for this growing season, retail prices are beginning to decrease with lower demand. Anhydrous is 10% lower compared to last month while urea is 5% less expensive. Anhydrous had an average price of $451 per ton while urea was at $321/ton. The remaining six fertilizers had just slightly lower prices compared to last month. DAP had an average price of $436/ton, MAP $467/ton, potash $340/ton, 10-34-0 $431/ton, UAN28 $235/ton and UAN32 $268/ton. On a price per pound of nitrogen basis, the average urea price was at $0.35/lb.N, anhydrous $0.28/lb.N, UAN28 $0.42/lb.N and UAN32 $0.42/lb.N. Retailers report fertilizer prices are pushing lower as the application season wraps up and as retailers prepare to refill their fertilizer stocks. Steve Lias, general manager of Farmers Elevator Company located in Humboldt, South Dakota, told DTN nitrogen products in particular are moving lower right now. “I think we are seeing urea and other nitrogen products significantly lower because of the new domestic supplies we now have in place,” Lias said. “We pull from Port Neal’s (Iowa) new facilities, and we do our own hauling now.” Lias said he thinks some retailers may hold off on their summer fill activities for a bit just to see how low prices fall. The danger of this, of course, is prices could always go the other direction, he said. Longer term, Lias said, he believes nitrogen does not have much upside pressure while phosphorus fertilizers could hang around at their current levels. “I think if there is one fertilizer which could be higher come fall it might be potash,” he said. “We are already so low I could easily see a $20-per-ton increase to the price by then.” Prices of all retail fertilizers are lower compared to a year earlier. Five of the eight major fertilizers are double digits lower. 10-34-0 is 20% lower from a year ago while anhydrous is 17% less expensive, UAN32 is 13% lower, UAN28 is 12% less expensive and urea is 11% less expensive. DAP is 7% lower, MAP is 6% less expensive and potash is 5% lower. DTN collects roughly 1,700 retail fertilizer bids from 310 retailer locations weekly. Not all fertilizer prices change each week. Prices are subject to change at any time. DTN Pro Grains subscribers can find current retail fertilizer price in the DTN Fertilizer Index on the Fertilizer page under Farm Business. Retail fertilizer charts dating back to 2010 are available in the DTN fertilizer segment. The charts included cost of N/lb., DAP, MAP, potash, urea, 10-34-0, anhydrous, UAN28 and UAN32. Source: Russ Quinn, DTN
USDA Opens More Land for Emergency Haying and Grazing
Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is authorizing the use of additional Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) lands for emergency grazing and haying in and around portions of Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota affected by severe drought. USDA is adding the ability for farmers and ranchers in these areas to hay and graze CRP wetland and buffer practices. “We are working to immediately address the dire straits facing drought-stricken farmers and ranchers,” said Perdue. “USDA is fully considering and authorizing any federal programs or related provisions we have available to meet the immediate needs of impacted producers.” For CRP practices previously announced, including those authorized today, Secretary Perdue is allowing this emergency action during and after the primary nesting season, where local drought conditions warrant in parts of Montana, North Dakota and South Dakota that have reached D2, or “severe”, drought level or greater according to the U.S. Drought Monitor. This includes counties with any part of their border located within 150 miles of authorized counties within the three states, and may extend into Idaho, Iowa, Nebraska, Minnesota and Wyoming. All emergency grazing must end Sept. 30, 2017 and emergency haying must end Aug. 31, 2017. The Secretary said that epic dry conditions, as high as D4 in some areas, coupled with an intense heatwave have left pastures in poor or very poor condition resulting in the need for ranchers to, at best, supplement grain and hay and at worst, sell their herds. Landowners interested in emergency haying or grazing of CRP acres should contact the Farm Service Agency (FSA) office and meet with the local Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) staff to obtain a modified conservation plan to include emergency haying/grazing. Individual conservation plans will take into consideration wildlife needs. CRP participants are reminded that a certain percentage of fields must be left unhayed or ungrazed. Additional information about the counties approved for emergency haying and grazing and the eligible CRP practices in this area is available at www.fsa.usda.gov/emergency-hayandgraze. For more information on CRP emergency grazing and haying, or other disaster assistance programs and loans, contact your local USDA Service Center, visit http://offices.usda.gov. Source: United States Department of Agriculture 
U.S. and China Sign Historic Agreement to Provide Market Access for U.S. Rice Exports
Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue today announced that the U.S. Department of Agriculture has reached agreement with Chinese officials on final details of a protocol to allow the United States to begin exporting rice to China for the first time ever. “This is another great day for U.S. agriculture and, in particular, for our rice growers and millers, who can now look forward to gaining access to the Chinese market. This market represents an exceptional opportunity today, with enormous potential for growth in the future,” said Perdue. “The agreement with China has been in the works for more than a decade and I’m pleased to see it finally come to fruition, especially knowing how greatly it will benefit our growers and industry." China is the world’s largest producer and consumer of rice. Since 2013, it has also been the largest importer, with imports reaching nearly 5 million tons last year. When the new rice protocol is fully implemented, the U.S. rice industry will have access to this critical market, significantly expanding export opportunities. U.S. rice exports can begin following the completion of an audit of U.S. rice facilities by China’s General Administration of Quality Supervision, Inspection and Quarantine. Source: United States Department of Agriculture 
Futures on the open are lower as rain is falling across northern Iowa ...
Futures on the open are lower as rain is falling across northern Iowa and Southern Minnesota. The radar is also indicating a shot of rain in Southern Ohio this morning. The debate of how much actual coverage these rains are dropping is being debated but the market is taking profits on length. The Cattle on Feed report will be released this afternoon and the market is looking for higher placements, on feed, and marketing?s versus last year. The Commitment of Traders report will also be released this afternoon. Funds were net buyers mid-week this week. On the Open at 8:30 a.m., Corn down 7, Soybeans 6 lower. KC &Chi Wheat near unchanged while Mpls Wheat is 4 lower. Enjoy the weekend!>
Seed Costs for Corn in 2017 and 2018
Per acre seed costs for corn likely will not significantly decrease until corn acres decline. Seed companies have little incentive to reduce prices under stable or growing acreages. In 2017, world corn acreage declines do not suggest large decreases in 2017 per acre seed costs. In recent years, farmers have shown a reluctance to switch from corn to other crops. At this point, the economic situation looks much the same for 2018 as it did for 2017, suggesting that corn acreages will not decrease, resulting in stable per acre seed costs into 2018. Per Acre Seed Costs from 1990 to 2016 Figure 1 shows per acre seed costs for corn from two sources: FBFM, central Illinois, high-productivity farmland - This data is summarized from grain farms enrolled in Illinois Farm Business Farm Management (FBFM). Figure 1 shows per acre seed costs for central Illinois farms having high-productivity farmland. USDA, US - This data comes from the Economic Reporting Service (ERS), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. While the data come from different sources, the series follow each other closely. The correlation coefficient between the two series is .99. As discussed in an earlier farmdoc daily article, seed costs increased dramatically from 2006 through 2014, a period of rising and high corn prices. In central Illinois, seed costs rose from $45 per acre in 2006 to $120 per acre in 2014. From 2006 to 2014, seed costs increased an average of 11% per year, much higher than the rates for fertilizers and pesticides (farmdoc daily, July 12, 2016?). Since 2014, per acre seed costs decreased slightly. In central Illinois, seed costs were $120 per acre in 2014 and $118 per acre in 2015 and 2016. From 2014 to 2015, seed costs in central Illinois decreased $2 per acre, a decrease of 2%. According to ERS, US costs decreased from $102 per acre in 2015 to $99 per acre in 2016, a decrease of $3 per acre. Seed Costs Relationship to Corn Acres in the World An extremely strong relationship exists between per acre seed costs and harvested corn acres in the world (see Figure 2). Between 1990 and 2016, seed costs per acre increased as corn acres in the world increased. A simple linear regression was used to explain seed costs in central Illinois per acre was explained by world corn acres. This regression explains 95% of the variability in seed costs between 1990 and 2016. Adding other explanatory variables - such as corn price, expected corn yield, or time - do not add to the explanatory power of the relationship. The economic intuitions behind this relationship are straightforward. Corn acre increases usually are associated with increases in the profitability of corn relative to other crops. Because of profitability increases, farmers have additional funds for making seed purchases. Seed companies then are presented opportunities to increase both the quantity of seed sold due to increases in demand, but also can increase seed prices because farmers in the position to pay for the higher seed prices. An environment where world corn acreages are decreasing could produce the opposite dynamic. The total size of the seed market would decrease. Seed companies then may have an incentive to lower seed prices in the hopes that price decreases stem some of the movement away from corn acres. While prices may decline given lower corn acres, there is little data to support this contention. There have been no extended periods of corn acreage decreases since 1990. Corn acres increased in 16 out of the 27 years between 1990 and 2017 (see Figure 2). When they did occur, declines were modest. Therefore, suggesting the impacts of corn acreage decreases on seed prices is speculative. Seed Company Profitability and Strategies Merger activities of seed technology companies have received a great deal in recent months. If all proposed mergers pass regulatory reviews, the "Big Six" agricultural technology companies will be reduced to four companies (see James McDonald, Choices). Corn acreage changes likely play a role in these merger activities. Seed companies experienced rapid growth in revenue from 2006 through 2014. Not only did seed quantities increase because of increasing corn acres, but the prices on seeds were increasing as well. Both price and quantity increases resulted in growing revenue. The large seed companies are publicly traded. In general, investors desire prospects of continuing growth in revenue and income. Publicly traded companies with high prospects of growth have higher stock prices than those companies with lower growth prospects. Hence, there is an incentive for a company's management to seek growth. Rather than being in an environment of growing acres, seed companies now face an environment of relatively stable corn acres. When faced with a stable environment, a strategy for seeking growth is to increase market share. One way to increase market share would be to decrease seed corn prices. Reducing seed price would make that seed company's product more attractive to farmers relative to other companies' seeds. However, the other seed companies likely would lower seed prices in response to the first seed company lower prices. Corn acres may not change because of seed price changes. After several companies lower their prices, all seed companies could face lower revenue because seed prices have come down while the quantity of seed sold has not increased. Compared to price decreases, seeking mergers could be viewed by management as an attractive way for seeking growth. The merged company could have the potential to develop new technologies that combine the two companies' strengths. The resulting new technologies could offer farmer additional value opportunities for which those farmers would be willing to pay a higher price, resulting in revenue growth to the merged company. Seed Costs in 2017 and 2018 Recent history of seed corn and acreage changes, along with seed company motives, suggests that per acre seed costs should not be expected to decrease until corn acreage decreases in the world occur. According to the Foreign Agricultural Service, corn acres harvested will be down by 1% in 2017, but will still be the second highest acreage in recent history (see Figure 2). The 2017 world acre figure does not result in a large decrease in seed costs. Farmers have shown a reluctance to switch away from corn to other crops. In Illinois, soybeans have been more profitable than corn since 2013 (farmdoc daily, July 7, 2016). Even given these profitability differences, shifts from corn to soybeans have been relatively modest. At this point, the economic situation for 2018 likely will be much the same as in 2017, suggesting the same plantings as in 2017. As a result, per acre seed costs in 2018 likely will be like those in 2017. References MacDonald, J. "Mergers and Competition in Seed and Agricultural Chemical Markets." Amber News, USDA Economic Research Service, April 03, 2017. https://www.ers.usda.gov/amber-waves/2017/april/mergers-and-competition-in-seed-and-agricultural-chemical-markets/ Schnitkey, G., and S. Sellars. "Growth Rates of Fertilizer, Pesticide, and Seed Costs over Time." farmdoc daily (6):130, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, July 12, 2016. Schnitkey, G. "Consider Planting Less Corn and More Soybeans in 2017." farmdoc daily (6):127, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, July 7, 2016. Schnitkey, G. "Corn Seed Costs from 1995 to 2014." farmdoc daily (5):214, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, November 17, 2015. Source: Gary Schnitkey, Farmdocdaily
True Armyworms Spotted in South Dakota Wheat
While scouting wheat last week I observed several fields with small populations of true armyworms. This may seem unimportant as most wheat fields are nearing maturity. However, true armyworms don’t just defoliate leaves. True armyworms will initially feed on leaves, but as the wheat dries down, they will begin feeding on other areas of the plant and eventually cause head clipping. True armyworm populations often will not reach economically damaging levels in wheat; however, head clipping will cause economic losses to occur rapidly. The drawback to managing true armyworms near harvest is that the insecticides available will delay harvest from 7-21 days after application. The specific pre-harvest interval for each insecticide is located on the label. Identification True armyworms can vary greatly in color from light brown to dark green or almost black (Figure 2). They can be identified based on a few distinguishing characteristics. True armyworm caterpillars have orange stripes present on the sides of their bodies (Figure 1), and a network of black lines present on their heads (Figure 3). The caterpillars have three true legs, and four pairs of prolegs that are present near the center of their bodies with a distinct black band present on each one. Scouting & Management What to look for? True armyworm caterpillar populations are often overlooked or are simply not present in wheat. True armyworm caterpillars feed at night. During the day, they are typically found near the base of the plant or in litter on the surface of the soil. When scouting for true armyworms in wheat, search for defoliation or head clipping in the field. If defoliation is observed, look for caterpillars on plants and in the soil around the injured plants. For wheat that is close to harvest, the threshold for true armyworm is 2 caterpillars that are less than ¾ inch in length per square foot. Insecticide Considerations The stage of the wheat and time until harvest should be considered prior to any insecticide application. Yield loss in wheat is more likely to occur if the flag leaf is removed prior to the soft dough stage. However, as plants mature there are fewer nutrients available and as a result caterpillars will move to the head and feed either on the beards or simply clip the heads. If populations of true armyworm caterpillars are observed in a maturing wheat field it is important to scout neighboring corn and later wheat fields as true armyworm caterpillars are known to move in large populations from one field to the next as resources are depleted. For insecticide management options please refer to the current edition of the South Dakota Pest Management Guide: Wheat. Remember to always follow label instructions and wear proper personal protective equipment when applying insecticides. Source: Adam Varenhorst, South Dakota State University Extension
Is Your Soybean Field at Risk for White Mold?
According to USDA-NASS crop progress report for the week of July 17, 49% of the soybeans in South Dakota are at flowering. The flowering growth stage is also the time when white mold infection is initiated. The white mold pathogen infects the soybeans through the flowers that are senescing after pollination. Unfortunately for this disease, by the time symptoms are seen, it is too late to apply a fungicide. Growers need to be aware of the risk factors for white mold in order to decide the need for applying a fungicide in order to prevent white mold from occurring when soybeans are at flowering. What are the risk factors for white mold? Field history. In the past, has the soybean field been infected with white mold? It is most likely that if a field has had white mold in the past, white mold will develop again. Row spacing. Are soybeans planted <20 inches row spacing? The narrower the row spacing, the higher the risk for white mold. Cultivar susceptibility. Is the planted cultivar rated moderately susceptible to susceptible for white mold? While there is no complete resistance to white mold, cultivar differences in tolerance to white mold do exist. Fertility level/yield potential. Does the field have an elevated fertility level? Has animal manure been applied this current season or past few seasons? Animal manure or excessive fertilizer tends to promote quick growth leading to early canopy closure. This increases the risk for white mold. Planting population. The higher the plant population (>150,000 seeds per acre), the faster the canopy will close and provide the microclimate for white mold to develop. Landscape/lay of the land. Does the field have a tree shelter belt or pronounced valley bottoms? Tree shelter belts tend to block air movement for soybeans close to the shelter belt. Also field bottoms tend to remain wet for longer periods of time, providing a conducive environment for white mold infection. Weather. White mold infection is favored by temperatures of 85°F or cooler and moisture whether it be from rain, fog, dew, or high relative humidity. Management For fields that have some or all of the above conditions, white mold risk may exist. Although white mold infection is driven by rainy weather and a lot of areas are relatively dry, it is important to monitor soybean growth and rainfall in the forecast. For soybeans at flowering with some of the above risk factors, especially field history and narrow row spacing, a fungicide may be advised. As noted above, the best fungicide timing for white mold management is at flowering (R1). Source: Emmanuel Byamukama, South Dakota State University Extension
Corn, Bean Futures Rise as Heat Wave Continues in Central Midwest
Corn and beans were higher in overnight trading as hot weather continues in much of the central Corn Belt. Wheat declined. Temperatures are expected to reach triple digits with heat indexes as high as 110 degrees Fahrenheit today in the eastern half of Kansas, southeastern Nebraska, the southern half of Iowa, almost all of Missouri and a large chunk of Illinois, according to the National Weather Service. The heat wave, which is never really welcome, comes at a bad time as corn is silking and soybeans are blooming and setting pods. Crop conditions declined this week with corn, beans and wheat all dropping by 1 percentage point thanks to the extremely hot weather this summer. Corn for December delivery rose 5 cents to $4.01 ¼ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade. Soybeans for November delivery gained 8 ¾ cents to $10.21 ¼ a bushel overnight. Soymeal gained $2.40 to $336.60 a short ton and soy oil futures added 0.30 cent to 34.18 cents a pound. Wheat for September delivery fell 1 cent to $5.02 a bushel overnight and Kansas City futures lost ½ cent to $4.99 ¾ a bushel. Source: Agriculture.com
Weather and exports are the main drivers of this morning?s higher ...
Weather and exports are the main drivers of this morning?s higher trade action. Weekly export sales for corn were almost 2 times better than last week. Beans were up 80% from last week. All wheat was up 87% from LW. Traders will be watching for confirmation of needed rainfall across Western Iowa. Tomorrows Cattle on Feed report is expected to show July 1 at 102.9%, June placements at 106.1% and June Marketings at 104.7%. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn +5 to +6, Soybeans +7 to +8, KC Wheat 2 lower. Crude oil +.40c/brl.>
Southern Rust has been confirmed in Cass, Fillmore and York counties ...
Southern Rust has been confirmed in Cass, Fillmore and York counties in Nebraska.>
National
Renk Seeds Field Day
Brownfield Anchor/Reporter Larry Lee will be on the ground in Sun Prairie, Wisconsin on August 22 for Renk Seeds Field Day. Continue reading Renk Seeds Field Day at Brownfield Ag News.      
Cattle numbers outside the range of pre-report estimates
The USDA?s latest Cattle On Feed report had numbers outside the range of pre-report estimates. Livestock market analyst Scott Brown says the USDA?s Cattle on Feed report shows a significant increase in both cattle on feed and placements.? Cattle on feed were up 4.5 percent and placements up 16 percent on the year.? ?You can look at some of what has been going on in the Dakota?s as part of what is to be attributed to these higher numbers,? he says.? Continue reading Cattle numbers outside the range of pre-report estimates at Brownfield Ag News.      
U of IL says corn seed costs won?t decline
The cost of corn seed is not expected to go down next year. A report by ag economists at the University of Illinois says the cost is highly related to the number of acres of corn in the world which are still relatively high, ?We saw some of that come down a bit in 2017, a slight decline, but not much of one. Twenty-17 corn acres in the world are actually the second highest. Continue reading U of IL says corn seed costs won’t decline at Brownfield Ag News.      
Heat wave to ease somewhat on the Plains, eastward
Over the next few days, a series of cold fronts will push across the Midwest and into the South and East. Showers and locally severe thunderstorms will precede and accompany the frontal passages, resulting in 5-day rainfall totals that could reach 1 to 3 inches. Farther west, however, only widely scattered showers will affect the High Plains, including drought-stricken sections of Montana and the Dakotas. Mostly dry weather will also persist in the Pacific Coast States, but monsoon-related showers could result in flash flooding in the Southwest. Continue reading Heat wave to ease somewhat on the Plains, eastward at Brownfield Ag News.      
InfoAg focuses on technology application
A spokesman for the precision agriculture event InfoAg says it?s not so much the technology itself that matters, but what it does.? Quentin Rund tells Brownfield the InfoAg Conference this week features cutting-edge precision agriculture equipment, and speakers talking about how technology is applied. ?We do try to bring some newer technology, some things we see that may be coming down the road,? Rund told Brownfield Ag News about the annual conference, ?but we always try to focus on practical application of the technology.? The InfoAg Conference has been held each year since 1995, according to Rund.? Continue reading InfoAg focuses on technology application at Brownfield Ag News.      
Southern rust on corn confirmed in two Indiana counties
Southern rust on corn has been moving north and has now been confirmed in two Indiana counties. Kiersten Wise, a plant pathologist with the University of Kentucky says southern rust can impact yield.? ?If it arrives at a time when corn is tasselling, silking, or even into blister we can see some yield loss if conditions are favorable for the disease,? she says. She tells Brownfield the potential for yield loss due to southern rust is higher this year due to the delayed growth stages of corn.? Continue reading Southern rust on corn confirmed in two Indiana counties at Brownfield Ag News.      
Minor setback won?t deter supporters of RVP relief
Renewable fuels supporters say a minor setback won?t prevent Reid Vapor Pressure relief from eventually happening. In response to the U.S. Senate Environment and Public Works Committee decision to not consider the Consumer and Fuel Retailer Choice Act before Congress adjourns for August recess, Growth Energy director of government affairs John Fuher tells Brownfield progress has been made. “There’s a lot of positive, forward movement on getting this done, but I think the tight timeframe (Congress) was given to get this done…it was just going to be really tough to get it done before the Wednesday deadline.” American Coalition for Ethanol (ACE) executive vice president Brian Jennings thanked Senators Deb Fischer of Nebraska and Joe Donnelly of Indiana for spearheading legislation that would allow for higher blends of ethanol during the summer. Continue reading Minor setback won’t deter supporters of RVP relief at Brownfield Ag News.      
New NCGA board member talks priorities on Capitol Hill
Besides the weather, the making of the 2018 Farm Bill was the big topic at NCGA?s Corn Congress this week in Washington, DC.? Missouri Corn Growers President Gary Porter tells Brownfield Ag News, ?One of the most important things for most of the corn farmers in America is crop insurance. It something gives you a little something to fall back on and some kind of a guarantee. So, that?s something that the corn farmers in America wanted us to make sure that we got across to all the legislators here on the Capitol.? Porter, who was elected to the NCGA board this week, says members have been meeting one on one with legislators about farm bill priorities for corn growers in each state, ?There?s a couple states that is really wanting to increase a little CRP. Continue reading New NCGA board member talks priorities on Capitol Hill at Brownfield Ag News.      
Milk futures lower, cash dairy mixed
Class III milk futures at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange were pressured by follow through selling and the year to year increase in June milk production. August was down $.20 at $16.10, September was $.17 lower at $16.46, October was down $.10 at $16.71, and November was 4.07 lower at $16.83. Cash cheese blocks were up $.0025 at $1.7075. One load was sold at $1.7075. The last uncovered offer was for one load at $1.72. Continue reading Milk futures lower, cash dairy mixed at Brownfield Ag News.      
Campbell Soup is withdrawing from GMA
Campbell Soup Company says it is?dropping its membership in the Grocery Manufacturers Association (GMA). According to various media reports, the move stems from disagreement over labeling of products containing genetically modified ingredients. Campbell split from the rest of the food industry in early 2016 with a commitment to label all of its products containing GMOs.? Campbell also supported efforts to make GMO labeling mandatory, while GMA fought to keep it voluntary. Campbell has also stated that it plans to comply with the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) new ?nutrition facts panel? by the original July 2018 deadline, even though the timetable was recently delayed by the agency. Continue reading Campbell Soup is withdrawing from GMA at Brownfield Ag News.      
Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: July 21, 2017
Sep. corn closed at $3.79 and 3/4,?down?11?and 1/4?cents Aug. soybeans closed at $10.09,?down 4?and 1/4?cents Aug. soybean meal closed at $329.70,?down 80 cents Aug. soybean oil closed at 33.80,?down 17 points Sep. wheat closed at $4.99 and 1/4,?down 6 and 1/2?cents Aug. live cattle closed at $116.42,?up 55 cents Aug.?lean hogs closed at $81.10,?unchanged Sep.? Continue reading Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: July 21, 2017 at Brownfield Ag News.      
China?s biotech approval process back in spotlight
  China?s confusing biotech approval process is back in the spotlight after the country recently approved two GMO products but left four others on the waiting list. Iowa ag secretary Bill Northey will be in China next week as part of an Iowa agricultural trade mission. He says the issue of biotech trait approval will likely be discussed. ?There needs to be a process?a little more transparent?so people know what?s coming,? Northey says. Continue reading China’s biotech approval process back in spotlight at Brownfield Ag News.      
McKinney?s diverse background a good fit for new USDA role
Earlier this week Indiana State Director of Agriculture Ted McKinney was selected by President Trump to serve as the Undersecretary for Trade and Foreign Agricultural Affairs. McKinney tells Brownfield he?s honored to be nominated by the President.? ?I so appreciate the support and encouragement from Secretary Perude and frankly the many friends here in the industry and Indiana who have reached out and expressed support,? he says.? ?I look forward to serving ? if confirmed.? In May, Ag Secretary Sonny Perdue announced the creation of the position, which he says is a recognition of the ever-increasing importance of international trade to American agriculture. Continue reading McKinney’s diverse background a good fit for new USDA role at Brownfield Ag News.      
Japanese firm agrees to buy Kansas-based Creekstone Farms
A diversified Japanese trading firm has agreed to purchase Kansas-based packing company Creekstone Farms.? Creekstone is the 12th largest US packing firm and supplies high-quality meats, including Black Angus beef and never raised with antibiotics Duroc Pork. Following China?s lifting of the US beef ban, Creekstone gained its license to export beef to the country.? Japan?s Nikkei financial press says Marubeni expects China?s appetite for meat to increase as the middle class continues to grow and has targeted sales of $620 million by 2020 by increasing exports to China along with other countries. Continue reading Japanese firm agrees to buy Kansas-based Creekstone Farms at Brownfield Ag News.      
Mink production continues to decline
Mink production continued to decline last year from its peak in 2014. The USDA says 3.3 million pelts were produced, down 10 percent from the year before. The value of pelts declined one percent while the average price increased three dollars to $35 per pelt. Wisconsin led the nation in mink production with 1.2 million pelts. Continue reading Mink production continues to decline at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
Application Period Starts Wednesday for Louisiana Farm Flood Grants
Louisiana farmers who lost at least $10,000 because of last year's floods can get federal grants to cover up to $100,000 in such losses, and the application period begins Wednesday.
Finance, Farming Are Focus of U.K.-U.S. Trade Talks, Fox Says
Trade chief says deal could add $52 billion in U.K. trade.
Iowa Officials Hope Pork Plant will Keep Town Vibrant
Eagle Grove City Administrator George McGuire said the planned Prestage hog processing plant in Wright County, Iowa is an example of how an industry can breathe new life into rural areas.
820-pound Hog Shot in Alabama May Have Fled Neighbor's Pen
An 820-pound (372-kilogram) hog that an Alabama man shot and killed in his front yard may have escaped from a pen on a nearby farm, according to the man's hog-raising neighbor.
Estate Auction For John Deere Salesman Features Beautiful John Deere Tractors
Don Johnson was a longtime salesman at Ernie Williams LTD John Deere dealership in Algona, IA. Johnson's farm estate auction this past Wednesday (July 18, 2017) featured his beautiful line of John Deere tractors, new and old
Chipotle Customer Illnesses Prove to Be Lawsuit Magnet
Company beat 2016 investor suit in March only to be sued anew.
Commodity Traders Face Travel and Entertainment Cuts, Bunge Says
All areas are being targeted in ‘game-changer’ plan, CEO says.
Gulke: Here's What Could Stop the Drought Rally
The current heat wave that’s descended on key grain production areas in the Great Plains and Midwest may not be over yet – but is the related ‘drought rally’ about to wrap up? Jerry Gulke, president of the Gulke Group, thinks that’s certainly a possibili [...]
USFR Weekly Recap -July 22-23, 2017
usfr
Driven by Dollars to Non-GMO Crops
Symphony of non-GMOs, biotech and covers helps Arkansas farmer turn a profit 
Senate Appropriations Committee Makes Changes to 2018 Dairy MPP
The Senate Appropriations Committee tweaked the Dairy Margin Protection Program (MPP) this week, and if passed by Congress would make the program more affordable for smaller producers and increasing the likelihood that margin payments will be triggered.
U.S. Cattle Inventory at 103 Million Head, Jumps 4% Since 2015
The U.S. beef cow herd increased 7% in the past two years, while beef replacement heifers were down 2% since USDA's last mid-year inventory report.
Budget Reconciliation and U.S. Agricultural Policy
The House and Senate Agriculture Committees have often faced a requirement to reduce mandatory spending under their jurisdiction as part of these reconciliation procedures, some of which have coincided with consideration of new farm bills.
Your Back Yard
In my market outlook presentations around the country, I often remind producers in the audience that you can?t see one millionth of the US crop from your back door. This is to counteract backyarditis, a phrase I coined to describe people who tend to think that whatever is going on in their vicinity is also happening to everyone else. This can be dangerous in commodity marketing, causing you to think crops are excellent when they are not, and more frequently the opposite.