CORN  
Delivery Date Cash Price Basis Futures Change Futures Price
History Oct17 3.06 10/20/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.39
 -4'4
344'4s
History Nov17 3.00 10/20/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.45
 -4'4
344'4s
History Dec17 3.07 10/20/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.38
 -4'4
344'4s
History Jan18 3.12 10/20/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.47
 -4'2
358'4s
History Feb18 3.14 10/20/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.45
 -4'2
358'4s
History Mar18 3.16 10/20/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.43
 -4'2
358'4s
History Apr18 3.21 10/20/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.46
 -4'0
367'2s
History May18 3.23 10/20/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.44
 -4'0
367'2s
History Oct18 3.51 10/20/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.40
 -3'2
391'2s
History Nov18 3.51 10/20/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.40
 -3'2
391'2s
 
SOYBEANS  
Delivery Date Cash Price Basis Futures Change Futures Price
History Oct17 8.84 10/20/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.95
 -7'6
978'6s
History Nov17 8.84 10/20/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.95
 -7'6
978'6s
History Dec17 8.89 10/20/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -1.00
 -7'6
989'2s
History Jan18 8.94 10/20/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -1.05
 -7'6
999'2s
History Oct18 9.03 10/20/2017 1:19:00 PM CST -0.95
 -5'4
998'0s
Local
The harvest season is rolling along now as the weather has decided to ...
The harvest season is rolling along now as the weather has decided to cooperate! This week we have TWO Harvest Photo Contest winners to make up for not having a winner last week. Congratulations to Katie Schriver and Zach Hunnicutt! Keep those photos coming as we love seeing them and sharing them! #harvest17>
National
Favorable harvest weather winding down
Across the Corn Belt, very warm, dry weather through Friday has been supportive of corn and soybean maturation and harvesting, especially in areas where fieldwork has been delayed by crop developmental delays or autumn wetness. Weather conditions also favor the development of recently planted winter wheat and cover crops. On the Plains, a few showers have developed across Texas. However, most of the region is experiencing warm, dry weather on Friday?nearly ideal for summer crop maturation and harvesting, as well as winter wheat planting, emergence, and establishment. Continue reading Favorable harvest weather winding down at Brownfield Ag News.      
Facebook
The harvest season is rolling along now as the weather has decided to ...
The harvest season is rolling along now as the weather has decided to cooperate! This week we have TWO Harvest Photo Contest winners to make up for not having a winner last week. Congratulations to Katie Schriver and Zach Hunnicutt! Keep those photos coming as we love seeing them and sharing them! #harvest17>
Curry 733-57 did it again, this time topping the 2nd place hybrid by ...
Curry 733-57 did it again, this time topping the 2nd place hybrid by 7.3 bu/acre. 3 for 3 in our plots so far. #YourYieldsMatter #YourYieldsYourFields>
Two topics have been at the forefront the past several weeks ? ...
Two topics have been at the forefront the past several weeks ? Renewable fuels and Section 199 within our current tax code. http://auroracooperative.blog/2017/10/20/government-affairs-update-october-20-2017/>
Pink shirts and pink ribbons as October is Breast Cancer Awareness ...
Pink shirts and pink ribbons as October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month #findacure>
The plot results are rolling in! Soybeans results from down south ...
The plot results are rolling in! Soybeans results from down south with Curry and NK coming in 1st. #YourYieldsMatter #YourYieldsYourFields>
Lauren Stadler sent us this awesome photo we wanted to share with ...
Lauren Stadler sent us this awesome photo we wanted to share with you! #harvest17>
Stop by and grab lunch on us!
Stop by and grab lunch on us!>
Your Corn, Your Ethanol!
Your Corn, Your Ethanol!>
#YourYieldsMatter #YourYieldsYourFields
#YourYieldsMatter #YourYieldsYourFields>
It?s a beautiful day for a combine ride! Stella Schegg got a ...
It?s a beautiful day for a combine ride! Stella Schegg got a combine ride from her Uncle Rob Hinrichs today! #harvest17>
Save the Date to join us for our two-day annual meeting event in ...
Save the Date to join us for our two-day annual meeting event in Grand Island! The event will include numerous educational sessions along with our annual business meeting and keynote speaker former Navy SEAL Robert O'Neill.>
Stop in and grab lunch on us!
Stop in and grab lunch on us!>
Harvest is in full swing and Chicago markets continue to trade the ...
Harvest is in full swing and Chicago markets continue to trade the narrow range. Nearby corn futures have traded the 20 cent range now for almost 9 weeks. The trade is talking about China?s National Congress meeting and looking for clues from these meetings to see how their economy could be shaped in the coming years. This morning the US Dollar is lower, bond futures are higher and Dow futures are down just over 100 points. Crude oil is trading lower this morning as well. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Dec. Corn at 3.51, +2 ?. Nov. Beans 9.86, + 1 ?, Dec. KC Wheat 4.30 ?, +2 ?.>
Thanks for sharing!
Thanks for sharing!>
It was a busy day in Hubbell along with another successful harvest ...
It was a busy day in Hubbell along with another successful harvest lunch! Thanks to all who stopped by and grabbed lunch with us today! #harvest17>
Local
The harvest season is rolling along now as the weather has decided to ...
The harvest season is rolling along now as the weather has decided to cooperate! This week we have TWO Harvest Photo Contest winners to make up for not having a winner last week. Congratulations to Katie Schriver and Zach Hunnicutt! Keep those photos coming as we love seeing them and sharing them! #harvest17>
Curry 733-57 did it again, this time topping the 2nd place hybrid by ...
Curry 733-57 did it again, this time topping the 2nd place hybrid by 7.3 bu/acre. 3 for 3 in our plots so far. #YourYieldsMatter #YourYieldsYourFields>
Two topics have been at the forefront the past several weeks ? ...
Two topics have been at the forefront the past several weeks ? Renewable fuels and Section 199 within our current tax code. http://auroracooperative.blog/2017/10/20/government-affairs-update-october-20-2017/>
Pink shirts and pink ribbons as October is Breast Cancer Awareness ...
Pink shirts and pink ribbons as October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month #findacure>
Nebraska Specialty Crop Program, Projects Receive Funding from USDA Grant Program
LINCOLN ? From growing chickpeas in western Nebraska to reducing pesticide use in apple orchards in Nebraska City, 12 specialty crop projects across the state will receive nearly $600,000 in funding from the U.S. Department of Agriculture?s Specialty Crop Block Grant Program (SCBGP). Administered by the Nebraska Department of Agriculture (NDA) using funding from the grant, the program supports research, development and marketing of specialty crops.
The plot results are rolling in! Soybeans results from down south ...
The plot results are rolling in! Soybeans results from down south with Curry and NK coming in 1st. #YourYieldsMatter #YourYieldsYourFields>
Lauren Stadler sent us this awesome photo we wanted to share with ...
Lauren Stadler sent us this awesome photo we wanted to share with you! #harvest17>
Stop by and grab lunch on us!
Stop by and grab lunch on us!>
Your Corn, Your Ethanol!
Your Corn, Your Ethanol!>
Nebraska Ag Update - October 20, 2017
Nebraska Ag Updates
NOAA Winter Outlook
Forecasters at NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center released the U.S. Winter Outlook today, with La Nina potentially emerging for the second year in a row as the biggest wildcard in how this year’s winter will shape up. La Nina has a 55- to 65-percent chance of developing before winter sets in. NOAA produces seasonal outlooks to help communities prepare for what’s likely to come in the next few months and minimize weather’s impacts on lives and livelihoods. Empowering people with actionable forecasts and winter weather tips is key to NOAA’s effort to build a Weather-Ready Nation. “If La Nina conditions develop, we predict it will be weak and potentially short-lived, but it could still shape the character of the upcoming winter,” said Mike Halpert, deputy director of NOAA’s Climate Prediction Center. “Typical La Nina patterns during winter include above average precipitation and colder than average temperatures along the Northern Tier of the U.S. and below normal precipitation and drier conditions across the South.” Other factors that influence winter weather include the Arctic Oscillation, which influences the number of arctic air masses that penetrate into the South and is difficult to predict more than one to two weeks in advance, and the Madden-Julian Oscillation, which can affect the number of heavy rain events along the West Coast. The 2017 U.S. Winter Outlook (December through February): Precipitation Wetter-than-average conditions are favored across most of the northern United States, extending from the northern Rockies, to the eastern Great Lakes, the Ohio Valley, in Hawaii and in western and northern Alaska. Drier-than-normal conditions are most likely across the entire southern U.S. Temperature Warmer-than-normal conditions are most likely across the southern two-thirds of the continental U.S., along the East Coast, across Hawaii and in western and northern Alaska. Below-average temperatures are favored along the Northern Tier of the country from Minnesota to the Pacific Northwest and in southeastern Alaska. The rest of the country falls into the equal chance category, which means they have an equal chance for above-, near-, or below-normal temperatures and/or precipitation because there is not a strong enough climate signal in these areas to shift the odds. Drought Despite the outlook favoring above-average precipitation this winter, drought is likely to persist in parts of the northern Plains, although improvement is anticipated farther West. Elsewhere, drought could develop across scattered areas of the South, mainly in regions that missed the rainfall associated with the active 2017 hurricane season. NOAA’s seasonal outlooks give the likelihood that temperature and precipitation will be above-, near, or below-average, and also how drought is expected to change, but do not project seasonal snowfall accumulations. While the last two winters featured above-average temperatures over much of the nation, significant snowstorms still impacted different parts of the country. Snow forecasts are generally not predictable more than a week in advance because they depend upon the strength and track of winter storms. The U.S. Winter Outlook will be updated on November 16. Source: NOAA
Field Drying and Harvest Losses in Corn
According to the USDA/NASS, as of Sunday, Oct. 15, 21 percent of Ohio’s corn was harvested for grain, compared to 34 percent for last year and 32 percent for the five-year average. Wet weather delayed corn harvest across the state and is not helping with field drying. Some growers are delaying harvest until grain moisture drops further. However, these delays increase the likelihood that stalk rots present in many fields will lead to stalk lodging problems. Some serious stalk rot and lodging problems have already been reported, as shown in the image submitted by Curtis Young in Van Wert County. Leaving corn to dry in the field exposes a crop to unfavorable weather conditions, as well as wildlife damage. A crop with weak plant integrity is more vulnerable to yield losses from stalk lodging and ear drop when weathering conditions occur. Additional losses may occur when ear rots reduce grain quality and can lead to significant dockage when the grain is marketed. Some ear rots produce mycotoxins, which may cause major health problems if fed to livestock. Several years ago we conducted a study that evaluated effects of four plant populations (24,000, 30,000, 36,000, and 42,000 plants/A) and three harvest dates (early-mid Oct., Nov. and Dec.) on the agronomic performance of four hybrids differing in maturity and stalk quality. The study was conducted at three locations in NW, NE, and SW Ohio over a three-year period for a total of eight experiments. Results of this study provide some insight on yield losses and changes in grain moisture and stalk quality associated with delaying harvest. The following lists some of the major findings from this research. KEY FINDINGS Results showed that nearly 90% of the yield loss associated with delayed corn harvest occurred when delays extended beyond mid-November. Grain moisture decreased nearly 6% between harvest dates in Oct. and Nov. Delaying harvest after early to mid Nov. achieved almost no additional grain drying. Higher plant populations resulted in increased grain yields when harvest occurred in early to mid-October. Only when harvest was delayed until mid-November or later did yields decline at plant populations above 30,000/acre. Hybrids with lower stalk strength ratings exhibited greater stalk rot, lodging and yield loss when harvest was delayed. Early harvest of these hybrids eliminated this effect. The greatest increase in stalk rot incidence came between harvest dates in October and November. In contrast, stalk lodging increased most after early-mid November. Harvest delays had little or no effect on grain quality characteristics such as oil, protein, starch, and kernel breakage. In this study, yields averaged across experiments, populations and hybrids, decreased about 13% between the Oct. and Dec. harvest dates. Most of the yield loss, about 11%, occurred after the early-mid Nov. harvest date. In three of the eight experiments, yield losses between Oct. and Dec. harvest dates ranged from 21 to 24%. In the other five experiments, yield losses ranged from 5 to 12%. Grain moisture content showed a decrease from the Oct. to Nov. harvest dates but little or no change beyond the Nov. harvest dates. Grain moisture, averaged across experiments, hybrid, and plant population, decreased 6.3% points between the Oct. and Dec. harvest dates, with most of the decrease occurring between the Oct. and Nov. harvest dates (5.8 % points); only a 0.5 % point decrease occurred after early-mid Nov. Population effects on grain moisture content were not consistent. Differences in grain moisture were evident among hybrids on the first harvest date in early-mid Oct. but were generally negligible on the later dates. A Field Loss Calculator for Field Drying Corn Agronomists at the University of Wisconsin have developed a “Field Loss Calculator” Excel spreadsheet available at: http://corn.agronomy.wisc.edu/Season/DSS.aspx that allows producers to calculate the costs of harvesting today versus allowing the crop to stand in the field and harvesting later. The spreadsheet accounts for higher drying costs versus grain losses during field drying. It allows the user to account for elevator discounts and grain shrink. Source: Peter Thomison, Ohio State University Extension
Timing Fall Nitrogen
The substantial rain that fell over central and northern Illinois between October 5 and 15 mostly soaked into the soil that was dried out by crop water use, and harvest has moved back to full speed in most areas. With harvest, thoughts turn to application of fall ammonia in central and northern Illinois. Almost everyone is on board with waiting until soil temperatures are at or below 50 degrees before applying ammonia. Cool soil (along with use of nitrification inhibitor) lowers the rate of nitrification, so helps preserve N in the ammonium form. Nitrogen present in the soil as ammonium is safe from loss. Once air and soil temperatures start to decline in October, it’s natural to anticipate that soil temperatures will reach 50 soon, so some are inclined to start to apply before soil temperatures reach 50 degrees. But if we apply when soil is at 60 degrees and soil temperatures fail to drop quickly, or if they rise again after application, nitrification will continue and will persist as long as soils stay warmer. In fact, nitrification does not stop dead at 50 degrees; as a biological process, its rate drops off as temperature falls, but temperatures need to near freezing for nitrification to stop completely. So we need to wait to apply fall ammonia not only until soil temperatures are 50 or less, but until we have reasonable confidence that they’ll stay there. In Illinois, we normally consider November 1 to be the date at which we can be reasonably sure that soil temperatures won’t rise again until the next spring. That’s not a sure thing, however – in both of the past two years, soil temperatures have gone above 50 at least once between November and February. But most years it’s a reasonable starting date to balance keeping N safe with getting fall application done. Minimum air temperatures have fallen into the 40s this past week, which has people wondering if it might be OK to go ahead and start applying now. Minimum soil temperatures 4 inches deep under bare soil (from the Illinois Water Survey http://www.isws.illinois.edu/warm/soil) have dropped to the upper 40s to low 50s over much of the state each day between October 16 and 18 this week. The problem with using only the minimum soil temperature is that it doesn’t represent the actual soil temperature in the ammonia application zone. As Figure 1 shows, minimum soil temperatures (on clear days) are typically five degrees or so less than average soil temperatures for the day. So even though we may need a jacket on cool mornings this week, ammonia applied now is not going to be in soils with temperatures less than 50 degrees for some days or weeks. Air temperatures are forecast to stay in the 70s the rest of this week, to fall into the 50s (with lows in the mid to upper 30s) next week, then to rise again (with dry weather) for some period after that. We’re already past the average first frost date for central and northern Illinois, and even with more seasonal temperatures coming the last week of October, it doesn’t look like ammonia applied now will be as safe from nitrification and possible loss as will ammonia applied in November. If the soil is in condition to apply ammonia, soil temperatures are in the upper 40s, and the 10-day forecast doesn’t show above-normal temperatures settling in, the last few days of October might offer an opportunity to start applying ammonia. But what if early November is warmer than normal, and soil temperatures remain above 50? Delaying application, of course, moves us closer to having safer soil temperatures. Average Illinois fall temperatures have been trending slowly upward for some decades now, and as we have seen the last few years, waiting until November 1 does not assure low soil temperatures as consistently as it did in the past. So if a stretch of warm weather is still in the forecast at the end of October, it might make sense to wait a little longer. Otherwise, patience in waiting another 10 days will likely be rewarded, even if – as is often be the case when doing the right thing – the reward isn’t very visible. Source: Emerson Nafziger, University of Illinois Extension
Resistant Weeds Continue Their March Across the Landscape
Driving across many parts of the Midwest this past summer, crop field watchers were likely to find an unexpected sight among the tall rows of corn and soybeans — weeds. In many cases, weeds such as ragweed, marestail, and waterhemp were easily two to three times the height of the surrounding crops, especially in soybean fields across states such as Indiana and Ohio. Advertisement According to Dr. David Hillger, Enlist Field Specialist for DowDuPont, this “explosion” of tall weeds across the nation’s Corn Belt in 2017 isn’t that surprising, considering how wet parts of the Midwest remained throughout the spring planting season. “When it’s wet, some growers may consider skipping burndown,” says Hillger. “A rainy spring can make it difficult to clean up fields before planting. Still, it’s usually best to delay planting and take time for a burndown. Soybeans in particular are somewhat forgiving of planting date.” Of course, besides a wet spring, all these weeds in crop fields is an illustration of an even bigger problem for today’s agriculture — the spread of herbicide-resistance. By last count, there were just under 250 confirmed herbicide-resistant weeds present across the U.S., impacting crop fields in virtually every state. A handful of states — California, Nebraska, Arkansas, Illinois, and Michigan — have more than 20 different types of herbicide-resistant weeds growing within their borders. In fact, when CropLife® magazine recently surveyed weed Extension representatives across the country, 100% of them said that herbicide-resistant weeds “remain a major problem in our area.” “Glyphosate-resistance is widespread,” said Dane Bowers, Herbicide Technical Product Lead for Syngenta, during a spring 2017 interview. “And this is not limited to just glyphosate. All herbicides are now at risk.” The Worst Weeds Although there are a host of herbicide-resistant weeds for agriculture to contend with, by far the most troublesome one seems to be Palmer amaranth (or pigweed). In the CropLife Weeds survey, almost half of respondents (45%) indicated this single weed type was the most difficult to control in their parts of the country. A recent survey of 200 weeds scientists conducted by the Weed Science Society of America (WSSA) came to a similar conclusion regarding Palmer amaranth. Here, Palmer amaranth topped the list of “most troublesome weeds,” outpacing equally hard-to-control types such as common lambsquarters, marestail, morning glory, and waterhemp. On the most common weeds list, Palmer amaranth finished in fourth place, behind common lambsquarters, foxtail, and morning glory. “Weed scientists have confirmed multiple cases of herbicide resistance in Palmer amaranth, common lambsquarters, marestail, morning glory, waterhemp, and common ragweed, except for the morning glories, where there is suspected resistance to glyphosate,” said Dr. Lee Van Wychen, Science Policy Director for WSSA, of the survey results. “While each of these species has evolved traits that make them widespread and tough competitors in broadleaf crops such as soybeans and cotton, there is no question that their difficulty to control with herbicides has pushed them to the top of the list in the survey.” He went on to add that although Palmer amaranth was only listed as the most troublesome weed in cotton, it ranked first in the overall survey based upon the number of respondents who cited it as a problem. “Palmer amaranth differs from other pigweed and waterhemp species due to its rapid growth,” says Dave Ruen, Field Scientist for DowDuPont. “Farmers cannot let this weed get ahead of the crop.” Based upon the data, Palmer amaranth is an extremely hardy weed, dropping an average of 100,000 seeds each season that can quickly spread its presence to neighboring fields. At last count, Palmer amaranth had developed resistance to multiple herbicides including glyphosate, with more appearing all the time. “PPO-resistant Palmer amaranth was identified in our geography in fall 2016,” says Dr. Karla Leigh Gage, Assistant Professor of Weed Science and Plant Biology at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. “This was the first full growing season over which we tried to make growers aware of this potential issue.” Among weed scientists surveyed by CropLife, waterhemp ranked just behind Palmer amaranth in herbicide-resistance issues at 33%. According to DowDuPont’s Ruen, waterhemp can cause devastating yield loss if left uncontrolled. “Research from the University of Illinois has shown waterhemp can cause up to 40% yield loss in soybeans,” he says. “Commonly known as a summer annual, waterhemp germination and emergence also can extend late into the season.” Finishing tied in third place on the CropLife Weeds survey were marestail (horseweed) and ragweed, both cited by 11% of respondents as the most troublesome weeds to control. In particular, says Dr. Jeff Ellis, Field Scientist for DowDuPont, marestail has particular notoriety among scientists since it was the first weed to show glyphosate resistance back in 2000. “If left uncontrolled, herbicide-resistant marestail can present huge challenges for farmers at planting and throughout the season,” says Ellis. “A single female marestail plant can produce approximately 200,000 seeds that are transported by wind, perpetuating the spread of herbicide-resistant populations.” The New Control Options Naturally, the agricultural marketplace has spent years and millions of dollars to find new options for fighting back against herbicide-resistant weeds. The first of these began appearing a few years ago in the form of blended herbicides such as Acuron from Syngenta. These new offerings mixed three or four different active ingredients into their formulations featuring different modes of action in an effort to keep weeds under control. Just this year, dicamba-resistant crops began appearing on a widespread basis. Supported by Monsanto, DowDuPont, and BASF, these crops offered growers the option to use dicamba herbicide in-season as a way to control herbicide-resistant weeds. However, many weed scientists were quick to caution applicators and growers regarding the use of these products/crops because of the potential for off-target drift damaging nearby non-resistant crops. “Concerns about drift led the U.S. EPA to issue time-limiting registrations for the auxin herbicides dicamba and 2,4-D of two years and five years, respectively,” said Dr. Kevin Bradley, Associate Professor at the University of Missouri. “Unless growers show they can use these herbicides as labeled, the registrations could easily be revoked.” Since that time, unfortunately, there have been some widely reported issues with dicamba application and off-target movement. In fact, more than 1,000 complaints have been filed with state officials in such places as Arkansas, Missouri, and Tennessee regarding suspected dicamba drift problems. Some of the weed scientists surveyed by CropLife noted this as well. “Dicamba cropping systems in our area performed just as expected in 2017,” says Dr. Bill Johnson, Professor of Weed Science at Purdue University. “It offered good control of ragweed and provided some help on marestail, waterhemp, and Palmer amaranth, but there were too many instances of off-target movement.” Still, the marketplace can expect more such efforts at herbicide-resistant weed control from suppliers in 2018. Combining both blended product and new cropping system strategies, Syngenta is hoping to introduce Tavium plus VaporGrip Technology. This product blends dicamba and S-metolachlor and can be used on Roundup Ready 2 Xtend soybeans and Bollgard II XtendFlex cotton. And now that they’ve received formal approval for export to China, the 2,4-D-based Enlist cropping systems should begin appearing in the marketplace for the 2018 season. “According to experts, resistant weeds can be found today on more than 100 million acres of farmland in the U.S.,” says John Chase, U.S. Commercial Leader, Enlist Weed Control System for DowDuPont. “We’ve already seen some success in this fight with the launch of Enlist cotton earlier this year, and it is our hope that corn growers will be able to gain this same level of success against stubborn weeds in their fields.” Source: Eric Sfiligoj, CropLife
#YourYieldsMatter #YourYieldsYourFields
#YourYieldsMatter #YourYieldsYourFields>
National
Favorable harvest weather winding down
Across the Corn Belt, very warm, dry weather through Friday has been supportive of corn and soybean maturation and harvesting, especially in areas where fieldwork has been delayed by crop developmental delays or autumn wetness. Weather conditions also favor the development of recently planted winter wheat and cover crops. On the Plains, a few showers have developed across Texas. However, most of the region is experiencing warm, dry weather on Friday?nearly ideal for summer crop maturation and harvesting, as well as winter wheat planting, emergence, and establishment. Continue reading Favorable harvest weather winding down at Brownfield Ag News.      
A change in weather ahead for the Heartland
Another major surge of rain and high-elevation snow will arrive across the Northwest during the weekend. Additional precipitation could reach 4 to 12 inches from the Cascades westward, leading to local flooding. Also during the weekend, rain will develop in the vicinity of a cold front stretching from the upper Great Lakes region to Texas. The rain will gradually advance eastward, leading to 5-day rainfall totals of 1 to 3 inches across much of the eastern half of the U.S. Continue reading A change in weather ahead for the Heartland at Brownfield Ag News.      
Monsanto files complaint against Arkansas Plant Board
  Monsanto says it filed a complaint Friday in court about the Arkansas Plant Board?s rejection of Monsanto?s petition to stop that state?s ban on the company?s XtendiMax dicamba herbicide for 2018. In a statement to Brownfield, Monsanto?s Scott Partridge said the ban is unwarranted and puts Arkansas farmers at a disadvantage. According to Partridge, the complaint filed in Pulaski County Circuit Court says the Arkansas plant board overlooked ?extensive volatility data provided to it ? including data that the EPA used in its registration decision.? Earlier this month, the EPA announced it was making the dicamba products Restricted USE Pesticides for the 2018 growing season because of crop damage reports this growing season, a decision made with Monsanto and the other makers of the dicamba products. Continue reading Monsanto files complaint against Arkansas Plant Board at Brownfield Ag News.      
Harvest pressure sends soybeans, corn lower
Soybeans were lower on fund and technical selling. The trade?s expecting good harvest progress ahead of new rain delays in parts of the Midwest and Plains. China bought 198,000 tons of 2017/18 U.S. beans Friday, the second day in a row with a big sale to the world?s top buyer. Soybean meal was lower and bean oil was higher, adjusting product spreads. The Rosario Grain Exchange says scattered soybean planting is underway in Argentina. Continue reading Harvest pressure sends soybeans, corn lower at Brownfield Ag News.      
Parson to launch ?Buy Missouri? in fly-around
Lieutenant Governor Mike Parson launches a new statewide program next week called ?Buy Missouri?.? Parson tells Brownfield Ag News the program promotes Missouri-made products while strengthening the state?s economy. ?We want to make that they understand what Missouri products are in those grocery stores or hardware stores or department stores,? Parson told Brownfield Ag News in Columbia Thursday.? ?We want them to take a good look at a Missouri product first.? The ?Buy Missouri? program is similar to a farm and food-related program that came before it. Continue reading Parson to launch “Buy Missouri” in fly-around at Brownfield Ag News.      
U.S. Wheat Associates to close Cairo office
U.S. Wheat Associates will close its Cairo, Egypt office December 1. The U.S. wheat industry?s export market development organization began considering changes as the supply of lower priced wheat from Russia increased.? US Wheat President Vince Peterson says closing the Cairo office was a difficult decision.? Since 2016, regional management for US Wheat?s Middle East operations has been with its office in Rotterdam, The Netherlands. Peterson says U.S. Wheat will continue to provide trade service to wheat buyers in Egypt, Iraq, Saudi Arabia and other countries in the region on a targeted basis. Continue reading U.S. Wheat Associates to close Cairo office at Brownfield Ag News.      
Cattle futures up ahead of bearish Cattle on Feed report
At the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, live and feeder cattle futures traded both sides ahead of Friday?s Cattle on Feed numbers.? The market was also looking for direction from cash trade but found some support in the recent strength in the wholesale prices.? With the report?s release look for selling pressure to develop early on Monday.? October live cattle closed $.47 higher at $111.67 and December live cattle closed $.45 higher at $116.60. October feeder cattle closed $.47 higher at $153.62 and November feeder cattle closed $.30 higher at $153.07. Continue reading Cattle futures up ahead of bearish Cattle on Feed report at Brownfield Ag News.      
Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: October 20, 2017
Dec. corn closed at $3.44 and 1/2,?down 4 and?1/2 cents Nov. soybeans closed at $9.78 and 3/4,?down 7?and 3/4?cents Oct. soybean meal closed at $317.10,?down $4.30 Dec. soybean oil closed at 34.16,?up?33?points Dec. wheat closed at $4.26,?down 6?and 3/4?cents Oct. live cattle closed at $111.67,?up 47?cents Dec. lean hogs closed at $64.85,?up 60 cents Nov. Continue reading Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: October 20, 2017 at Brownfield Ag News.      
RFA head hopes Pruitt ?learned a lesson? on RFS
The head of the Renewable Fuels Association, Bob Dinneen, says he?hopes EPA administrator Scott Pruitt has ?learned a lesson? when it comes to the Renewable Fuel Standard. ?I am hopeful that Administrator Pruitt will now get the message that the RFS is a policy not to be tinkered with,? Dinneen tells Brownfield. ?You know, implement the law. Allow biofuels to grow. Don?t look for ways to nibble away at the program to accommodate the business plan of some oil company.? Under heavy pressure from farm state lawmakers and other biofuels supporters, Pruitt announced Thursday?that the EPA will abandon proposed changes to the RFS. Continue reading RFA head hopes Pruitt ‘learned a lesson’ on RFS at Brownfield Ag News.      
Illinois farmer says yields surprisingly good
A west-central Illinois farmer is about half done with harvest and says his yields are good, ?We?re pleasantly surprised. I wasn?t sure we were going to have the kind of yields that we?re pulling out. But, it?s been a pleasant surprise.? Two-and-a-half inches of rain last Saturday made Ron Moore switch to harvesting corn for a couple of days early this week. It was pretty dry in his area, near Roseville, at different times during the summer, ?I felt like it was going to damage our yields but, boy, they?re doing really well right now.? Moore is president of the American Soybean Association. Continue reading Illinois farmer says yields surprisingly good at Brownfield Ag News.      
NMPF confirms Canadian dairy policy was part of NAFTA discussion
The National Milk Producers Federation confirms the Canadian dairy policies were brought up during this week?s 4th round of NAFTA renegotiations. NMPF?s Chris Galen tells Brownfield he agrees with Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer, who said there are things that need to be discussed and you can?t conclude a successful round of negotiations without resolving them.? He says Canada?s Class 7 system is one of them.? “For too long, we’ve seen really sky-high tariffs?that Canada has been allowed to maintain on imports coming from the U.S. Continue reading NMPF confirms Canadian dairy policy was part of NAFTA discussion at Brownfield Ag News.      
Wisconsin waives 5-year Johne?s Disease vaccination re certification
Wisconsin veterinarians already certified to administer Johne?s Disease vaccinations no longer need recertification every five years. As of October 2nd, a waiver was put in place to get rid of the online recertification through the University of Wisconsin.? Initial veterinarian certification for Johne?s Disease is still required. The University of Wisconsin has also stopped updating the online training modules. Continue reading Wisconsin waives 5-year Johne’s Disease vaccination re certification at Brownfield Ag News.      
What?s in a name?or title?
As the clock counts down to Christmas ? I am sorry to mention that ? there?s plenty of heavy-duty issues, including Farm Bill evolution, tax reform/cuts, NAFTA, KORUS, etc., to which ag is paying serious attention.? However, this week there was a relatively lighthearted moment, and who can?t use an occasional lighthearted moment in this town? The chuckle came midweek when Senate Agriculture Committee Chair Pat Roberts (R, KS) pulled together his committee just off the Senate floor for a quick business scrum, the point of which was to formally approve the nominations of Nebraska Director of Agriculture Greg Ibach to be USDA under secretary for marketing and regulatory programs, and long-time Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey to be under secretary for?well, under secretary for what is kind of up in the air right now. Continue reading What’s in a name…or title? at Brownfield Ag News.      
Interactive dairy education comes to classrooms
The National Dairy Council has teamed up with Discovery Education to help K-12 students learn about dairy farming. The program is called Undeniably Dairy: Caring for Cows and Nourishing Communities.? It started Thursday (today) with a virtual dairy farm tour allowing students to see modern practices, cow care, and innovation. After the virtual tour, students will have access to digital learning tools and classroom explorations. The Undeniably Dairy education initiative will expand this school year, adding virtual interactive experiences with classroom activities and educator guides. Continue reading Interactive dairy education comes to classrooms at Brownfield Ag News.      
Midday cash livestock markets
Direct cash cattle trade is starting to pick up with a few deals in parts of Nebraska this morning at $175.00, which is steady with last week?s weighted average.? Other bids are reported at $109 to $110 live.? However, some are reportedly still holding out for higher money.? It is quite possible significant trade volume could be delayed until after today?s on-feed report is released.? Asking prices are around $112 to $113 in the South and $176 to $177 in the North. Continue reading Midday cash livestock markets at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
Ways To Annoy A Mechanic
Be nice to the guy who's there to fix your machine.
Gulke: Markets Disappoint Despite Trump's EPA Reversal
What should have been good news for the grain and oilseed markets ended up having the opposite effect as we ended the week down, sharply down some cases says Jerry Gulke, president of the Gulke Group. 
Changes needed in legislation, funding and oversight to protect Americ
Changes needed in legislation, funding and oversight to protect American agriculture from biological attacks.
APFN-US--Herbicide Dispute-Arkansas
Monsanto sues Arkansas board for banning disputed herbicide
ND--Drought-North Dakota
Senator calls for more USDA workers to respond to drought
Pete's Pick of the Week: 1992 John Deere 4760 Tractor
This tractor is coming up for sale in November.
Ramped-Up Harvest Weighs on Corn, Soybeans
Corn and soybean futures faced pressure this week from improved weather for harvest activities.
KC Federal Reserve: Operating Loans on the Rise
The downturn in the farm economy is forcing more farmers to turn to banks for operating loans. The Kansas City Federal Reserve’s Ag Finance Databook is released each quarter. The latest report shows lending at agricultural banks stabilized in the third quarter of 2017, but the authors noted risks in the ag sector remain due to a persistently weak agricultural economy. Nathan Kauffman, Assistant Vice President and Omaha Branch Executive, says when gauging the health of the farm economy, it’s not accurate to just focus on prices.
Any farmer that has had forage tested bought hay or entered a hay show
Any farmer that has had forage tested bought hay or entered a hay show, there is a chance they are familiar with the acronym, RFV.
EPA Administrator Reinforces Support of RFS to Senators
It’s been a whirlwind week for the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS). From initial changes, to the President stepping in and ordering EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt to back down, as of Friday, the fate of the RFS is a little clearer.
Syngenta, USAID Renew Global Collaboration to Improve Food Security
Syngenta and the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) today signed an updated Memorandum?of Understanding (MOU) to support agriculture and food security activities in Africa, Asia and Latin America. This renewed collaboration, which started in 2013, aims to promote food security amongst smallholder farmers by cooperating on improving research and development, technology adoption and farmer know-how to boost farm productivity – whilst also tackling new challenges like the recent invasion of the fall armyworm pest (FAW) in Africa. A key focus will be to improve the capacity of smallholder farmers to trial, adopt and safely use inputs to boost their yields as well as identifying and equipping young men and women interested in farming as a business. Selected projects will incorporate the use of advanced digital and satellite technology to enhance pest prediction and surveillance, support decision making and improve project evaluation. Programs on environmental sustainability and smallholder capacity training will further underpin Syngenta?s Good Growth Plan. Erik Fyrwald, Chief Executive Office of Syngenta, said ?We place great value on our continued partnership with USAID, which has helped us reach and train more smallholder farmers across the world than we would have been able to achieve alone. USAID?s work in supporting partnerships like this helps deliver real change for farmers in terms of sustainability and profitability.?
Precision Agriculture to Improve Nutrient Use Efficiency in Brazil
By Rodrigo Trevisan  As I mentioned in my last article, the IPNI Brazil Symposium on Precision Agriculture was held in early October in Goi?nia, Goi?s, in central western Brazil. Attendees were mainly service providers, crop consultants, soil analysis laboratories, fertilizer companies, agricultural machinery companies, researchers, and farmers. Presentations were made by important precision ag researchers from Brazil, U.S., and Mexico, with a focus on fertilizer best management practices. Several key concepts for the adoption of precision agriculture were recalled and discussed. The topic that generated the most controversy was grid soil sampling, mainly due to the concerns of the minimum density of points required to efficiently characterize the spatial variability of an area. The commonly adopted standard of one point for every 3 to 5 hectares is not always sufficient for this. Dense sampling schemas have little acceptance due to higher costs. The use of remote and proximal sensors for the collection of dense auxiliary data is still marginally adopted. The main alternatives discussed were the use of management zones or sampling in regular cells, without the use of interpolation. This is especially the case when the total number of points is small, less than about 60, due to small areas or low sampling density. One of the limiting factors for the adoption of management zones in Brazil is the lack of good quality yield maps. It is estimated that this important data source is being collected in less than 1% of the grain production area in Brazil. Picture from the closing session at IPNI Brazil Symposium on Precision Agriculture. Professor Jose Paulo Molin presented a historical review of precision agriculture development in Brazil and future trends. The management practices to take advantage of variability were also discussed. It was a consensus that there is an urgent need for agronomic knowledge to evolve to enable more complete and assertive recommendations. One example of research that was presented is the use of cover crops planted at different densities in each management zone according to the main problem to be overcome. Understanding the relationship between soil and relief attributes, such as water retention capacity and crop response to fertilizers, has also been shown to be important for generating prescriptions. One of the tools that researchers and farmers are using to advance in this subject is the use of on-farm trials in each management zone. Plant population and fertilizer rates have been the most commonly addressed subjects through this technique. This will also be one of the topics discussed at the Seminar of Precision Agriculture, which will be held in Piracicaba ? SP in November. The importance of training and educating people in precision agriculture was also mentioned by many speakers. After approximately 20 years of precision agriculture use in Brazil, less than 5% of undergraduate courses in Agronomy or Agricultural Engineering have incorporated precision agriculture as a subject in their academic curriculum. Despite the existence of many short-term and even postgraduate courses, many undergraduates do not even have the chance to be formally introduced to important concepts of precision agriculture. The Brazilian Association of Precision Agriculture (AsBraAP), created last year, should add efforts to promote the education of precision agriculture and improve the qualification of professionals in related fields. Another important action of AsBraAP is to promote the Brazilian Congress of Precision Agriculture. The CONBAP 2018 was officially launched during the event and will take place next year in Curitiba ? Paran? in October. The?IPNI Brazil Symposium on Precision Agriculture presented excellent technical quality and a good environment for learning and professional networking. More than that, it reinforced the importance of generating and disseminating good knowledge. Precision agriculture is an excellent tool to improve nutrients use efficiency and a lot of people are coming together to advance with this technology in Brazil and worldwide.   Editor’s Note: Rodrigo Trevisan is Coordinator of Precision Agriculture at Terra Santa Agro (www.terrasantaagro.com), responsible for the development of projects related to precision agriculture in more than 180,000 hectares cultivated with soybean, corn and cotton.? See the original article here.
Argentina to Plant Fewer Soybeans
Grain markets continue to monitor harvest results as extended weather forecasts look to get colder in the US Midwest. We hope you'll consider listening in to our webinar Tuesday night next week - see details below.
Hoffman's Forecast: Will Rains Put the Brakes on Harvest?
Mike Hoffman's AgDay forecast for October 20, 2017