CORN  
Delivery Date Cash Price Basis Futures Change Futures Price
History Aug17 3.12 08/22/2017 12:01:00 AM CST -0.39
 1'6
350'6
History Sep17 3.14 08/22/2017 12:01:00 AM CST -0.37
 1'6
350'6
History Oct17 3.20 08/22/2017 12:01:00 AM CST -0.45
 1'6
364'6
History Nov17 3.20 08/22/2017 12:01:00 AM CST -0.45
 1'6
364'6
History Dec17 3.27 08/22/2017 12:01:00 AM CST -0.38
 1'6
364'6
History Jan18 3.30 08/22/2017 12:01:00 AM CST -0.47
 2'0
377'2
History Feb18 3.32 08/22/2017 12:01:00 AM CST -0.45
 2'0
377'2
History Mar18 3.34 08/22/2017 12:01:00 AM CST -0.43
 2'0
377'2
History Apr18 3.38 08/21/2017 11:57:00 PM CST -0.46
 2'0
383'4
History May18 3.40 08/21/2017 11:57:00 PM CST -0.44
 2'0
383'4
History Oct18 3.62 08/21/2017 11:03:00 PM CST -0.40
 1'4
402'2
History Nov18 3.62 08/21/2017 11:03:00 PM CST -0.40
 1'4
402'2
 
SOYBEANS  
Delivery Date Cash Price Basis Futures Change Futures Price
History Aug17 8.66 08/22/2017 12:03:00 AM CST -0.75
 4'2
940'4
History Sep17 8.48 08/22/2017 12:03:00 AM CST -0.93
 4'2
940'4
History Oct17 8.46 08/22/2017 12:03:00 AM CST -0.95
 4'2
940'4
History Nov17 8.46 08/22/2017 12:03:00 AM CST -0.95
 4'2
940'4
History Dec17 8.49 08/22/2017 12:00:00 AM CST -1.00
 4'0
948'4
History Jan18 8.51 08/21/2017 11:34:00 PM CST -1.05
 3'0
956'0
History Oct18 8.61 08/21/2017 9:40:00 PM CST -0.95
 2'0
956'0
National
Another good week for Nebraska?s crops
All in all, it was another good week for Nebraska?s crops. Temperatures were average for mid-August and significant rainfall of an inch or more was received across most the state, although some central counties received up to six inches or more. Corn rated 63 percent good to excellent and 24 percent fair. Soybeans rated 61 percent good to excellent and 28 percent fair. Alfalfa condition rated 50 percent good to excellent. Continue reading Another good week for Nebraska’s crops at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
1,200-plus Visitors Gather at Missouri Dairy for Eclipse
Rain, thunder and storm clouds couldn’t scare off the eclipse and the more than 1,200 people who attended a viewing party at a Missouri dairy. ​
Facebook
Just a little peak into the eclipse fun at the main office in Aurora! ...
Just a little peak into the eclipse fun at the main office in Aurora! It was a nice little break in the work day! #SolarEclipse2017>
Seasonal selling pressure has carried through the weekend and into ...
Seasonal selling pressure has carried through the weekend and into this morning. Rainfall was noted across Western and Central Iowa over the weekend with some locations seeing just over 5 inches. Many private crop tours start today many traders are expecting variable results. There is some talk in the marketplace about a potential early frost. Friday afternoon, we?ll get another look at the Cattle on Feed Report. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn -3, Soybeans -5 to -6, KC Wheat -3. Give us a call at 855-226-7587 to talk about the current managed money fund positions and how it could affect trade moving into harvest.>
"I grew up on a family farm south of Lawrence where my parents still ...
"I grew up on a family farm south of Lawrence where my parents still raise corn, wheat, and cattle. I spent my childhood helping with harvest, planting, fixing fence, and working cattle." Click the link below to read the rest of Ryan's story! #KeepingItLocal>
The power of fungicide...these pictures truly say it all! ...
The power of fungicide...these pictures truly say it all! #YourYieldsMatter #FungicidePays>
After a night of consistent rain in central Nebraska, the rain gauges ...
After a night of consistent rain in central Nebraska, the rain gauges on a farm north of Aurora are both at 5.8" this morning at 7:30 a.m. and it's still raining. Looks like it's time to dump them out and start over.>
All grains are trading lower again this morning on the open. Crop ...
All grains are trading lower again this morning on the open. Crop condition ratings improved a couple points yesterday afternoon, but the trade is having a hard time agreeing with the USDA. This morning the US Dollar is slightly higher and crude oil is trading slightly lower. Trade will be watching to see if the bulls have enough strength to keep prices above recent lows. Several well-known crop tours will start up the end of this week and beginning of next week. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn down 4, Old Soybeans down 4, New Soybeans down 6, KC Wheat 7 lower.>
Congratulations to the July winners in the Summer of Ethanol ...
Congratulations to the July winners in the Summer of Ethanol Giveaway! #YourCornYourEthanol Richard Waller of Holdrege Bruce Christensen of Dannebrog Kirk Duensing of Byron Mike Wilkens of Gibbon Richard Hoffman of Doniphan Gale Christenson of Aurora John Jensen of Upland Steve Mead of Aurora Charlie Dubas of Palmer Monte Hermansen of Harvard Don't forget a drawing will be held on September 15th for one lucky winner to receive free ethanol blended gasoline for a year! Every 15 gallons of ethanol purchased this month gets you in the drawing!>
Chicago futures are starting the week in the red. A south American ...
Chicago futures are starting the week in the red. A south American boat of corn is expected to load this week and point to the United States. The US Dollar is trading higher this morning. Crop progress will be released at 3 p.m. this afternoon and the market is looking for steady conditions vs last week. The radar this morning shows a bit of moisture hitting the ground in Northern Iowa. The marketplace will continue to argue grain production estimates as several private crop tours will start towards the end of this week and next week. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn down 3, Soybeans down 10, KC Wheat down 9.>
Today we want to wish Deanie Harris a Happy Retirement! Thank you ...
Today we want to wish Deanie Harris a Happy Retirement! Thank you Deanie for 32 plus years of dedicated service to the Roseland location and community! You will be missed!>
The USDA pegged US corn yield at 169.5 and soybeans at 49.4 bushels ...
The USDA pegged US corn yield at 169.5 and soybeans at 49.4 bushels per acre. Corn production at 14.153 billion bushels and soybean production at 4.381 billion bushels. Traders will continue to debate yield estimates as most in the marketplace still believe that yield and production numbers are too high based on weather. The outside markets have the dollar down sharp, crude oil is a bit weaker and global markets could see some position squaring ahead of the weekend. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn +3/4, Soybeans +5, KC Wheat -3>
Two of our summer interns gave their final presentations to our ...
Two of our summer interns gave their final presentations to our leadership team before we sent them off for another year of college! Job well done ladies! #YourFuture>
The USDA will release their updated Supply and Demand balance sheets ...
The USDA will release their updated Supply and Demand balance sheets this morning at 11 a.m. The average trade guess for corn yield is 166.2 bushels per acre and soybeans are estimated at 47.5 bushels per acre. Total corn production looks to come in near 13.855 billion bushels with soybeans at 4.212 billion bushels. New crop corn ending stocks are estimated at just over 2 billion bushels while beans are estimated at 424 million. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn +1/4, Soybeans +4 to 5, KC Wheat 1 to 2 higher. For more information on today's report, give us a call at 855-226-7587.>
Futures posted very small gains overnight on light volume. The ...
Futures posted very small gains overnight on light volume. The marketplace only has to wait another day to see the new fundamental news from the Supply and Demand report. Average estimates for tomorrows yield number is 165.3 bushels per acre on the corn side. The USDA will also update world crop production. Canada, China, and Ukraine had weather issues so traders will be watching those closely. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn +1, Soybeans +2, KC Wheat +1 ?.>
Excited to see how some of our new yield solutions for soybeans pan ...
Excited to see how some of our new yield solutions for soybeans pan out this coming harvest! #YourYieldsMatter>
Chicago markets are stronger this morning as the market waits for ...
Chicago markets are stronger this morning as the market waits for updated crop condition ratings from the USDA this afternoon. Also on the calendar for this week is the Supply & Demand update on Thursday. Old crop corn carryout is estimated at 2.370 billion bushels while new crop is estimated at 1.940 billion bushels. Old soybeans are estimated at 410 million bushels and new crop is 433 million bushels. Traders continue to watch weather but it appears mostly non-threatening at this time. To start the week on the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn +3.5, Soybeans +7, KC Wheat +3.>
Local
Just a little peak into the eclipse fun at the main office in Aurora! ...
Just a little peak into the eclipse fun at the main office in Aurora! It was a nice little break in the work day! #SolarEclipse2017>
Wheat Streak Mosaic Caused $76 Million in Damage in Kansas-Start 2018 Control Now
Kansas State University officials are joining in on a group effort to help Kansas farmers stop the spread of a destructive wheat disease that took a strong foothold in the state’s fields this year. In early August, the Kansas Wheat Commission reported that wheat streak mosaic virus caused a conservative $76.8 million in direct losses to Kansas wheat farmers. That amounts to 19.2 million bushels of wheat, and a 5.7 percent yield loss – well above the average 1.5 percent yield loss. Kansas State University wheat disease specialist Erick DeWolf said the virus was particularly harsh in areas of west-central Kansas. “Almost all of western Kansas was above normal levels and even parts of central Kansas (was) above normal,” DeWolf said. “The amount of disease we’re seeing in individual fields and entire regions of the state is much more widespread and much more severe than what we’ve experienced in at least a decade.” Wheat streak mosaic is a plant pathogen carried by the wheat curl mite. The virus stunts the growth of wheat and related plants, causing streaks of yellow, non-uniform discoloration on the leaves. The mites often live on volunteer wheat, or the wheat that grows or is left in a field after the year’s harvest. In some parts of Kansas, wheat streak mosaic virus caused farmers to completely abandon their 2017 wheat crop. “I remember in some of those areas, they would have been 50-60 bushel wheat pretty easily, and to go from that level of yield potential to zero is a big loss,” DeWolf said. The Kansas Wheat Commission and the Kansas Department of Agriculture are among the groups leading a statewide effort to combat the disease for the 2018 season. An education campaign titled ‘Stop the Streak’ aims to prevent the conditions that led to the above-normal levels of the virus this year. DeWolf said those conditions included adequate rainfall and volunteer wheat in July and August 2016 that led to increased populations of the wheat curl mite. He said mild temperatures that persisted well into November allowed the tiny mites to survive well past planting of the 2017 crop. “When we have above-normal volunteer populations and mite populations going into the fall, where they have plenty of time to move around, that definitely sets the stage for major outbreaks of wheat streak mosaic,” DeWolf said. “I think it was those things that were set in motion last summer and fall that really translated into the above-normal levels of wheat streak that we saw this year.” Officials tend to agree that there are only three ways to control the spread of wheat streak mosaic virus: remove volunteer wheat and other grassy weeds; avoid early planting; and plant varieties with resistance to the virus. “Removing volunteer wheat has got to be step one,” DeWolf said. “It comes down to a lot of these communities deciding that they’ve had enough of this disease and doing what they need to as a community to control the volunteer wheat. “An individual grower can do a lot of things right, but if their neighbors – the community – doesn’t follow the best practices for controlling the volunteer wheat, it can really nullify a lot of their individual activities. So, wherever possible, these communities can be coming together – groups of co-ops, or other groups of growers – to try and do everything they can to make sure the volunteer wheat is controlled, that should greatly reduce the risk of a repeat performance on wheat streak mosaic.” DeWolf said that, if using a herbicide, volunteer wheat should be dead for at least two weeks before farmers plant their 2018 crop. “If you’re using an herbicide like glyphosate that needs some time to be enacted in the plants, it’s those dead dry plants that are going to decrease the mite population,” he said. “And that’s the condition we need to be in before our new wheat crop begins to emerge.” At this point, he added, “we’re probably looking at a lead time of at least three weeks, maybe four weeks, prior to the planting of our new wheat crop. The window is open here for some folks already and we’re probably looking at August as the critical month of trying to get the volunteer wheat under control.” DeWolf encouraged farmers to work with seed companies to buy varieties with resistance to wheat streak mosaic, and resist planting next year’s crop too early. ““Planting date does play into this,” he said. “I’ve worked with enough growers in western Kansas to know that many times they plant wheat when they have moisture. Year in and year out, moisture is one of the major yield-limiting factors that we have in our wheat production in Kansas. “So it’s not uncommon for us to see some growers go in and start planting their wheat in late August or early September. That does elevate the risk of us having problems. Wherever possible, I would encourage them to plant their wheat toward the end of the more agronomically acceptable time, what we often refer to as the Hessian Fly-free date. That would generally reduce the risk of them having a wheat streak mosaic problem.” Source: Pat Melgares, Kansas State University
Conditions Deteriorate in Iowa, Northern Plains
Temperatures were cooler than average for much of the contiguous U.S. this week, including 4-8 degrees F below average across a large part of the Plains and Midwest this past week. Only Washington and Oregon saw temperatures more than 4 degrees above average for the period. With the below-average temperatures came a lot of rain in some regions, notably across northern Texas and much of Oklahoma, where rainfall was more than 600% of normal for this time of year. There were also substantial rains in parts of Wyoming, Nebraska, parts of the Dakotas, and in many places across the southeast. Rainfall was below average in southern Texas, parts of the midwest, northeast, and northwest, particularly notable in Montana where wildfires are prevalent. View the Drought Monitor here. South Heavy rain, in excess of 6-8 inches in some locations, fell across much of this region over the past week. The rain was particularly welcome for areas that had been experiencing dry conditions, especially northern Texas and central to western Oklahoma. So much rain fell in these regions that all dryness was completely alleviated across several broad swaths and led to 2-category, and even the rare 3-category, drought improvements in Oklahoma, from severe drought to normal conditions in Beckham and part of Roger Mills Counties in the west and parts of Kingfisher, Blaine, Canadian, and Oklahoma Counties in the central part of the state, receiving well over 5 inches in places. One resident reported that Roger Mills County is the greenest they have ever seen in August. Two-category improvements were also notable around the Texas panhandle from the previous week, including along the Texas, Oklahoma border and around Roberts and Hutchinson Counties. Conditions also returned to normal at the Texas-Louisiana-Arkansas border and in part of east-central northern Mississippi. However, northeastern Mississippi missed out on the heavy rains and abnormally dry (D0) conditions expanded slightly to the east and north. Midwest Rainfall helped in some areas, but lack of adequate precipitation worsened conditions in others. Abnormal dryness (D0) was introduced in western and southern Portage, northern Stark, and eastern Medina Counties in northeastern Ohio, where rainfall over the past month has been less than 20% of average. In Michigan, dry conditions over the past month were evident across larger portions of the south and abnormally dry conditions expanded northward to Kalamazoo, Barry, eastern Kent, southern Montcalm, Shiawassee, Clinton, and southwestern Genesee Counties. Similarly, short-term dryness is now evident farther south in part of central to west central Indiana where adequate rainfall is lacking. In two small regions of southern Iowa (eastern Union, Clarke, most of Lucas, southern Warren and southeastern Madison Counties and to the east, central Wapello County), dryness over the past two to four months warranted degradation to extreme drought (D3). Wapello was also very dry during the last growing season. Extreme drought conditions were also expanded slightly west and north in the south. Moderate drought (D1) expanded in southwestern and far northeastern Iowa, reflecting dryness over the past four months or so. Louisa County in the southeast Iowa is a bit drier and moderate drought is now apparent in part of Wright and Franklin County in north central Iowa. However, rainfall in excess of 2 inches over the past week did help to improve conditions in the northwestern part of the state. Moderate drought now encompasses all of Marshall County in northwestern Minnesota,where low streamflows are reported and fire danger is rated high. High Plains With the recent rainfalls, conditions returned to normal in northwestern Kansas along the Nebraska border and across extreme southern Kansas. In southwestern Nebraska, moderate drought shrank (D1) in Perkins, Chase, Hayes, and Lincoln Counties, following precipitation totals of up to nearly 4 inches. Likewise in the Nebraska panhandle, normal conditions prevail once again across eastern Box Butte, northeastern Morrill county, and northern Garden Counties, thanks to precipitation totals of 1.5-2.5 inches over the past week. Heavy rain also erased remaining dryness in Laramie County, Wyoming. Conditions improved to abnormally dry (D0) in parts of Custer, Blaine, and Loup counties in central Nebraska after two consecutive nights of heavy rainfall. Moderate drought also shrank slightly in north central Holt and south central Boyd counties, where up to 3.5 inches of rain fell. And normal conditions returned to a swath from Ewing to Atkinson in Holt County. Some areas in South Dakota received 3-7 inches of rain over the past week, contributing to improving conditions in some northeastern, north central, and south central pockets. However, the west was not as fortunate. Extreme drought (D3) creeped farther west in Meade County while severe drought (D2) expanded in Jackson. In southwestern North Dakota, rainfall helped alleviate exceptional drought (D4, the worst category), although due to the extremely poor growing conditions, it remained around the Hettinger County area. Conditions also improved in Colorado. Normal conditions returned around the Denver metro area and in Phillips County in the northeastern corner of the state. Looking ahead For the week of August 16-23, rain is forecast across most of the contiguous United States, save most of the western quarter and part of eastern to southern Texas. Rainfall may be in excess of two inches or more in some areas that will significantly benefit, including much of the Plains from North Dakota south through Oklahoma, parts of the midwest where dry conditions have recently creeped in, and across much of the East Coast states. Over the next few days, temperatures are broadly forecast to be in the 70s to 80s across much of the northern tier and 80s to 90s across much of South. Temperatures in the 90s and higher are likely limited mostly to Texas, southwestern Arizona, and southern California. Looking further ahead into the second week period, above-average temperatures are favored across most of the contiguous U.S., particularly in southern Texas, Florida, and part of the upper midwest to the mid- and North Atlantic states, while below-average conditions are favored in Alaska. Wetter-than-average are favored across much of the eastern two-thirds of the contiguous U.S., part of the west, most notably western New Mexico, ad eastern Alaska. Drier-than-average conditions are favored across most of Texas and Oklahoma, along with the northwestern tier of the Contiguous U.S. and western Alaska. Source: Drought Monitor
Sudden Death Syndrome Starting to Show up in Soybeans
Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS) symptoms typically start to appear when soybeans are in the mid- to late pod-filling stages. This disease is becoming more common in Nebraska, but still occurs in very isolated pockets in many fields. It’s crucial to assess the areas affected and make sure you identify the disease correctly to make management decisions for future years. Sudden Death Syndrome, which was first identified in Nebraska over 12 years ago, is usually found in small areas of a field. Soil compaction and high fertility levels are associated with increased levels of SDS. Sudden Death Symptoms in Soybeans Foliar symptoms of sudden death syndrome start with interveinal necrosis. Spots coalesce to form brown streaks with yellow margins between the leaf veins. Leaves eventually drop, leaving the petiole (leaf stem) attached. The root system will have a deteriorated tap-root and lateral roots will only be evident in the upper soil profile. Plants will typically pull very easily and there may be a dark blue fungal growth on the roots. View videos here. Split the Stems. With any root and stem rot disease it is critical that the stems are split to properly examine symptoms and identify the disease. Brown stem rot will result in the same foliar symptoms as SDS and is also common in Nebraska. In plants with SDS splitting the stems will show discoloration is confined to the outer stem layers. The center of the stem will not be discolored. The root cortex discoloration will be light-gray to brown and may extend up the stem. In contrast, brown stem rot will discolor the center of the stem with the brown discoloration typically extending from the soil line going up. Accurate diagnosis is critical for proper management for the next soybean crop. If you are uncertain of the cause of damage in your field, I encourage you to have it identified at the University of Nebraska Plant and Pest Diagnostic Clinic. More information on SDS and other soybean diseases can be found in the Soybean Plant Disease Management section of CropWatch. Source: University of Nebraska CropWatch
Small Banks Know How Farmers Are Doing
When I was a teenager, I took a Red Cross Senior Lifesaving class one summer. We were taught not to swim toward an active drowning person from the front. As soon as the drowning victim saw you, he or she could claw over you in a panic and pull you both under. You were supposed to surface dive under the victim and approach from the back. (These days, you’re taught to take along a buoy or towel, extend it to the victim, and not get too close.) I’m lucky never to have had that skill tested. But in the 1980s, as a newspaper ag reporter in Nebraska, I saw too many lenders and farmer borrowers drown together financially. Well-meaning bankers rolled over operating loans, refinancing old debt with new until neither the bank nor all of its borrowers survived. More commonly, borrowers sold off land or quit farming to pay debts or banks and Farm Credit System lenders foreclosed and sold off the assets, dragging land prices down as well. I’m old enough to remember all of this vividly. That may be one reason why the editors here at Successful Farming magazine at times drag me out of retirement to cover ag finance. Another is that I still enjoy interviewing economists and bankers. (I’m proud to say, too, that my son-in-law is a banker in the not-very-rural economy of Chicago.) In spite of my searing education in agricultural lending principles 30 years ago, I’m inclined to believe the many economists and analysts who say the 1980s won’t be repeated in the new century’s teens. Lenders no longer finance land purchases with the meager down payments seen in the inflationary ’70s. And both banks and farmers shared in real, not speculative, gains just three or four years ago. Still, debt is like deep water: Never underestimate its potential to float you or pull you under. Small town banks are a strong and important source of credit in rural America. That’s especially true in the western Corn Belt, Great Plains, and Rocky Mountain states. That’s where you find most of the banks that make the American Bankers Association’s annual list of the top 100 banks by farm loan concentration. These are modest institutions that make nearly all of their loans to farmers and ranchers in places where big banks may just cherry-pick a few borrowers. Here are trends gleaned from bankers who are on the ground in farm country: First, it’s possible the worst is behind us. John Schmid, president of Grant County State Bank in Carson, North Dakota, works with conservative, diversified farmers and ranchers southwest of Bismarck. But he has an interest in another bank farther east where high corn prices drew young people back to farming earlier in this decade. “It got pretty lean pretty quick. I think some of them went back to their old jobs,” he says. That’s nothing Schmid welcomes. Most of his Carson area borrowers are no younger than their mid-30s, and he worries about a lack of new blood in farming. Yet, it’s also a reality that the newest entrants to farming often are the least able to withstand a downturn in prices. Second, farmers themselves are more cautious about debt, not just their lenders who depend on renting out money for a living. A survey of bankers cited in a midsummer report by the Omaha branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City may support this. In “Farm Lending Steady, but Risks Remain,” economists Nathan Kauffman and Matt Clark found that loan volume ticked upward in the second quarter of this year but during the entire first half of 2017 it was down 7% from the first half of last year. That could be due to a “prolonged renewal season,” they said. “Amid a recent decline in working capital and a slight increase in risk associated with agricultural lending, some bankers and borrowers have taken more time to reaffirm financials, expenditures, and loan terms from one year to the next.” That’s true, no doubt. But conservative farm borrowers are part of that, too. At the Campbell County State Bank in Herreid, South Dakota, executive vice president Earl Melhaff was surprised at his borrowers’ penny pinching this year. They were asking for smaller operating loans than a year or two back, he says, spending less on machinery and fertilizer. “It’s amazing where they’re at,” he says in our story on the health of farm banks. Third, the value of high-quality corn ground is being proven. Some of the farms served by our sample of country bank lenders don’t have the best land. As a native Nebraskan, I’m familiar with the hilly ground near Ashton State Bank. It’s tougher to make that cash flow under current prices. Fourth, any optimism about farm lending and borrowing rebounding a lot could be misplaced. When I asked Blake Howsden of Nebraska State Bank if we’re in a new normal, he corrected me. “It’s not the new normal. It’s normal normal,” he said. The supercycle high prices of 2012 are unusual. The current tight farming margins are not, he believes. Fifth, point one could be dead wrong. The worst may not be fading away. Maybe it’s still to come, if other trends observed by the Kansas City Fed continue: rising interest rates, stretched out loan terms and rising delinquency rates. They could be leading indicators. The truth is, no one knows what the weather and commodities markets will bring to farmers and their lenders. How should we deal with that timeless uncertainty? Here are a few modest suggestions: Diversify your credit sources if you can. Bankers dislike competition from the Farm Credit System, which they view as unfair subsidized competition because of implied government support for bonds sold by the system. I think farmers need both the support of local banks that understand them as well as that outside capital that Farm Credit brings in. Don’t abandon that local bank that stayed with you, but keep open other options for credit. Follow your bank and farm credit lender financial trends. In this issue, we show you how to follow your bank’s financial status with public records that are online. It’s definitely a project for slow evenings in the winter, but in a few rare cases, you might be glad you did. Most of the time, this will just be an interesting glimpse into the red tape your banker has to put up with. Don’t be tempted by too much refinancing or extended terms. About a year ago, Gary Schnitkey at the University of Illinois, one of the nation’s leading agricultural economists, published a column on http://farmdocdaily.illinois.edu/ called “The Danger of Refinancing.” “Many farms have depleted working capital in the past several years,” Schnitkey wrote. “Now operating loan balances may exist that cannot be paid down with this year’s cash returns from farming operations. Some farms may consider restructuring all or a portion of their operating balances as longer termed notes. Refinancing may provide needed operating capital, but it also is a warning sign. If cash shortfalls continue and operating note balances build again, refinancing may lead to deeper problems in the future.” I urge you to read it, especially if you are older and still have enough assets or marketable skills that would enable you to retire comfortably. If that’s the case, you may find when you jump into this new pool, that the water temperature is just fine. Source: Daniel Looker, Agriculture.com
Seasonal selling pressure has carried through the weekend and into ...
Seasonal selling pressure has carried through the weekend and into this morning. Rainfall was noted across Western and Central Iowa over the weekend with some locations seeing just over 5 inches. Many private crop tours start today many traders are expecting variable results. There is some talk in the marketplace about a potential early frost. Friday afternoon, we?ll get another look at the Cattle on Feed Report. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn -3, Soybeans -5 to -6, KC Wheat -3. Give us a call at 855-226-7587 to talk about the current managed money fund positions and how it could affect trade moving into harvest.>
"I grew up on a family farm south of Lawrence where my parents still ...
"I grew up on a family farm south of Lawrence where my parents still raise corn, wheat, and cattle. I spent my childhood helping with harvest, planting, fixing fence, and working cattle." Click the link below to read the rest of Ryan's story! #KeepingItLocal>
Nebraska Ag Update - August 18, 2017
Nebraska Ag Updates
Late Season Weed Escapes in Soybeans?
Despite your best weed-control efforts this year, you still ended up with patches or fields with weeds coming through the crop canopy. Now that August has rolled around, what options are available to control weeds and prevent them from going to seed? What can we do differently to prevent this problem next year? August is a good time to evaluate your current weed management plan and develop strategies for next year. Is there a herbicide available for rescue treatment? The short answer is no. Although it would be great to have a herbicide rescue treatment to control escaped waterhemp and other weed species that are now 3+ feet in height in soybean, there are no control options available. The crop stage at this point is generally advanced far enough that products, such as Roundup, Liberty, Flexstar, dicamba, and others are no longer labeled for use in soybean. Although some may be inclined to spray Cobra or other lactofen-containing products in an attempt to control weed escapes, they will not provide effective control of large weeds and have significant crop-injury potential (up to a 14% yield reduction) (Nelson et al. 2007). Lactofen-containing herbicides such as Cobra have a 45 day pre-harvest interval that also needs to be considered. Refer to product labels for pre-harvest intervals and other important information. In most instances, spot-spraying is the best herbicide option. Will yield be impacted Probably not. If weeds were controlled earlier in the season and there are few sporadic escapes, there will likely not be an effect on soybean yield. However, one weed can make weed control more difficult in the future if seed production occurs. Although seed production of weeds will vary widely, waterhemp can produce over 200,000 seeds per plant in competition with soybean, lambsquarters can produce over 70,000 seeds per plant, and giant ragweed can produce over 10,000 seeds per plant. How long will weed seeds stick around? If escaped weeds are allowed to produce seed, they have the potential to stick around for decades. Over 50% of lambsquarters seeds will still be in the soil seed bank in 12 years. For waterhemp, 50% of the viable seeds will be degraded in 3 years. Giant ragweed seeds are degraded relatively quickly, with over 95% of the weed seeds being degraded in 2 years according to recently published U of MN research (Goplen et al. 2017). No matter what escaped weeds you’re dealing with, preventing seed production should be the primary concern. What can I do? Herbicides are not an option, but seed production can have lasting impacts on future weed control. Unfortunately the best option to control escaped weeds involves physical labor and pulling the weeds by hand. If soybean canopies are lagging behind and have not closed in, cultivation can still be used as an option, although cultivation will probably still not be effective on large weeds. There have been sightings of bean bars and wick style herbicide applicators this year, which are also options that may be applicable to your scenario. Many soybean growers this year have incorporated “hand-pulling” of problem weeds in their fields in addition to other weed control methods. Some of these growers have questioned if mature weeds need to be carried out of the field due to concerns that these weeds may contribute to the weed seed bank within the field. Remember that many weed seeds need to be “ripe” or physiologically mature before they would be of concern for next year’s crop. If not yet mature, this is referred to as “innate dormancy,” which is defined as the process of growth of an embryo to a stage fit for germination which has not been completed while the the embryo was still borne on the parent plant. Most weeds in Minnesota will begin producing viable seeds in the next 1-2 weeks, so the time to pull or control weeds is now. If escaped weeds are not controlled prior to seed production, keep in mind that combines are one of the best ways to spread weed seed. If there is a confined patch of weeds, consider going around the weed patch to prevent spreading weed seeds throughout the field. Consider harvesting order too. To keep clean fields clean, combine weedy fields last to prevent spreading seeds from field to field. What can I do differently to prevent weed escapes next year? Be proactive! Review and reflect on your weed management plan. The time you invest in evaluating the plan is well worth it. What you do on your farm matters, so take control and take action. Ask yourself these questions: Which weeds survived and why? Be honest with yourself. How effective were your preemergence herbicides on your spectrum of weeds? Which weeds escaped control? Consider product choice, activation of herbicide (rainfall, soil types) rate used and length of residual control expected. How effective were your postemergence herbicides and on which weeds? Were applications timely, on small weeds, with appropriate coverage? Did you use multiple, effective sites of action on your weeds? Did they have residual activity? Did you include non-chemical tactics in your plan? Do you suspect herbicide resistance? One clue is you will often find surviving plants right next to dead plants of the same species. You may also see small patches of escapes in a field. If you have waterhemp that was not adequately controlled by PPO inhibitor herbicides (e.g. Flexstar, Cobra) or glyphosate, and you suspect herbicide resistance, consider submitting a leaf sample to the University of Illinois Plant Clinic for a molecular-based test for glyphosate and PPO inhibitor herbicide resistance. The University of Illinois Plant Clinic can also run a diagnostic test on plants you suspect to be Palmer Amaranth. In planning for next year this would be money well spent. Submission form and instructions are located at: Submission form: http://web.extension.illinois.edu/plantclinic/downloads/molecular.pdf Instructions: http://web.extension.illinois.edu/plantclinic/downloads/herbicide.pdf References Goplen, JJ, CC Sheaffer, RL Becker, JA Coulter, FR Breitenbach, LM Behnken, GA Johnson, and JL Gunsolus. 2017. Seed bank depletion and emergence patterns of giant ragweed (Ambrosia trifida) in Minnesota cropping systems. Weed Sci. 65:52–60. Nelson, KA, GE Rottinghaus, and TE Nelson. 2007. Effect of lactofen application timing on yield and isoflavone concentration in soybean seed. Agron. Journal. 99:645–649. Source: Jared Goplen, Dave Nicolai, Lisa Behnken, Jeff Gunsolus, University of Minnesota Extension
Harnessing Rich Satellite Data to Estimate Crop Yield
Without advanced sensing technology, humans see only a small portion of the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Satellites see the full range-from high-energy gamma rays, to visible, infrared, and low-energy microwaves. The images and data they collect can be used to solve complex problems. For example, satellite data is being harnessed by researchers at the University of Illinois for a more complete picture of cropland and to estimate crop yield in the U.S. Corn Belt. "In places where we may see just the color green in crops, electromagnetic imaging from satellites reveals much more information about what's actually happening in the leaves of plants and even inside the canopy. How to leverage this information is the challenge," says Kaiyu Guan, an environmental scientist at the U of I and the lead author on the research. "Using various spectral bands and looking at them in an integrated way, reveals rich information for improving crop yield." Guan says this work is the first time that so many spectral bands, including visible, infrared, thermal, and passive and active microwave, and canopy fluorescence measurements have been brought together to look at crops. "We used an integrated framework called Partial Least-Square Regression to analyze all of the data together. This specific approach can identify commonly shared information across the different data sets. When we pull the shared information out from each data set, what's left is the unique information relevant to vegetation conditions and crop yield." The study uncovers that the many satellite data sets share common information related to crop biomass grown aboveground. However, the researchers also discover that different satellite data can reveal environmental stresses that crops experience related to drought and heat. Guan says the challenging aspect of crop observation is that the grain, which is what crop yield is all about, grows inside the canopy, where it isn't visible from above. "Visible or near-infrared bands typically used for crop monitoring are mainly sensitive to the upper canopy, but provide little information about deeper vegetation and soil conditions affecting crop water status and yield," says John Kimball from University of Montana, a long-term collaborator with Guan and a coauthor of the paper. "Our study suggests that the microwave radar data at the Ku-band contains uniquely useful information on crop growth," Guan says. "Besides the biomass information, it also contains additional information associated with crop water stress because of the higher microwave sensitivity to canopy water content, and microwave can also penetrate the canopy and see through part or all the canopy. We also find that thermal bands provide water and heat stress information," Guan says. "This information tells us when leaves open or close their pores to breathe and absorb carbon for growth." Coauthor David Lobell from Stanford University, who crafted the idea with Guan, says leveraging all of this satellite data together greatly increases the capacity to monitor crops and crop yield. "This is an age of big data. How to make sense of all of the data available, to generate useful information for farmers, economists, and others who need to know the crop yield, is an important challenge," Guan says. "This will be an important tool. And, although we started with the U.S. Corn Belt, this framework can be used to analyze cropland anywhere on the planet." The study, "The shared and unique values of optical, fluorescence, thermal and microwave satellite data for estimating large-scale crop yields," is published in Remote Sensing of Environment. The work was initiated and designed by Kaiyu Guan from U of I and David Lobell from Stanford University. It is coauthored by a multi-institute team of Jin Wu (Brookhaven National Lab), John S. Kimball (University of Montana), Martha C. Anderson (USDA ARS), Steve Frolking (University of New Hampshire), Bo Li (University of Illinois), and Christopher R. Hain (NOAA). Funding was provided by the NASA New Investigator Award (NNX16AI56G), U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF-SES-1048946), a Terman Fellowship from Stanford University, the University of Illinois, NSF grant NSF-EF1065074, and NASA (NNX14AI50G). All the data used in this study are available by request (kaiyug@illinois.edu). In addition to being an assistant professor in ecohydrology and geoinformatics in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences in the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences at U of I, Guan has a joint appointment as a Blue Waters professor affiliated with the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). Source: AgriMarketing
Sudden Death Syndrome Starting to Show up in Soybeans
Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS) symptoms typically start to appear when soybeans are in the mid- to late pod-filling stages. This disease is becoming more common in Nebraska, but still occurs in very isolated pockets in many fields. It’s crucial to assess the areas affected and make sure you identify the disease correctly to make management decisions for future years. Sudden Death Syndrome, which was first identified in Nebraska over 12 years ago, is usually found in small areas of a field. Soil compaction and high fertility levels are associated with increased levels of SDS. Sudden Death Symptoms in Soybeans Foliar symptoms of sudden death syndrome start with interveinal necrosis. Spots coalesce to form brown streaks with yellow margins between the leaf veins. Leaves eventually drop, leaving the petiole (leaf stem) attached. The root system will have a deteriorated tap-root and lateral roots will only be evident in the upper soil profile. Plants will typically pull very easily and there may be a dark blue fungal growth on the roots. Split the Stems. With any root and stem rot disease it is critical that the stems are split to properly examine symptoms and identify the disease. Brown stem rot will result in the same foliar symptoms as SDS and is also common in Nebraska. In plants with SDS splitting the stems will show discoloration is confined to the outer stem layers. The center of the stem will not be discolored. The root cortex discoloration will be light-gray to brown and may extend up the stem. In contrast, brown stem rot will discolor the center of the stem with the brown discoloration typically extending from the soil line going up. Accurate diagnosis is critical for proper management for the next soybean crop. If you are uncertain of the cause of damage in your field, I encourage you to have it identified at the University of Nebraska Plant and Pest Diagnostic Clinic. More information on SDS and other soybean diseases can be found in the Soybean Plant Disease Management section of CropWatch. Source: Nebraska CropWatch
The power of fungicide...these pictures truly say it all! ...
The power of fungicide...these pictures truly say it all! #YourYieldsMatter #FungicidePays>
Generational Transfer of Farm Decision Making
The agri-food industry pays a lot of attention to how assets transfer between generations in farm families. Wills, trusts and estate laws are the subject of financial planning conferences and law seminars. Even so, there are few answers about how is best to manage this complex topic. There is far less attention paid to how decision-making transitions from one generation to the next. The problem? As the roles of each on-farm generation evolve, it affects more than just the farm families. In 2016, researchers from Purdue University's Center for Food and Agricultural Business conducted a study about this issue with farmers in the U.S. and Canada. The goal was to get a better understanding of how decisions are made on multi-generational farms and how the roles of each generation affect purchasing and marketing decisions. Details of the study are available online, but I'd like to share a summary of thoughts and implications from it - mainly in preparation for a new center program, called Accelerate your Management Potential, or AMP. This program offers sessions dedicated to multi-generational farms and working more effectively across generational shifts and gaps. How farmers are dealing with generational shifts in decision-making is a big deal today, both for those farms and the sellers of products used on farms. Our data shows that most multi-generational farms in the U.S. and Canada intend to transition to the younger generation over the next eight years. The largest farms are more formal in this process, but few farms are 100 percent confident in the way they accomplish the transfer. There are some important implications for suppliers to consider as they think about strategies for serving multi-generational farms. Multiple generations of decision makers and large farms go hand-in-hand. If you think about it, this makes sense. For a farm to support multiple generations of families, they have to be a little larger than most. For smaller farm sizes, the younger generation often works off-farm, and when they do, they work full-time, particularly in the U.S. where they need insurance benefits. When we ask who has responsibility for purchase decisions, it is interesting to note that both generations suggest they have responsibility. The younger generation may have responsibility for selection, but the older generation still feels a great sense of responsibility - usually at least financial. These points create challenges for sellers who would prefer a simpler process of determining who to talk with about their products and services. Instead, sellers have to figure out where the farm is in terms of the decision-making transfer, which can be a contentious issue. Suppliers also have to figure out the role of each generation in the decision process for each product, and catch up with decision makers who might be working full-time or odd hours off the farm. As generations shift over the next several years, sellers have to figure out who in their organizations should be calling on whom within the farm. Generation matching is one approach that sellers have taken. Having young sellers call on young buyers and more seasoned sellers call on the older generation of buyers can be a useful strategy, but communication remains a challenge, and having multiple people involved with the farm is not overly efficient. The younger generation reports more concerns or sources of conflict than the older generation does. Generally, they feel like they have less power in the operation than the older generation does. Suppliers have to be careful about inserting themselves in this process and avoiding the landmines that occur as a result. At the end of the day, every customer requires individual consideration. For the largest multi-generational farms, frank discussion about the decision-making process and the preferences for approaching them may be worthwhile. Source: Purdue University
Tips for Conducting the End-of-Season Corn Stalk Nitrate Test
The end of season corn stalk nitrate test is one of the few diagnostic tools available to determine if excess nitrogen was applied to corn. The methodology and interpretation of this test were highlighted in previous Michigan State University Extension articles: “End of season corn stalk nitrate test” and “End of season cornstalk nitrate test in a drought year.” Here are some tips to the correct sampling procedure that is critical to getting reliable data from this test. The time for stalk sampling is critical. It is two to three weeks after physiological maturity or when black layers have formed on about 80-90 percent of the kernels. At this stage, any further mobilization of nitrogen from the plant to the kernels has ceased. Typically, most leaves and stalks have turned brown at this stage. The portion sampled is the 8-inch segment of stalk between 6 and 14 inches above the soil. Collect 12-15 segments within an area no larger than 10 acres. Remove all the leaf sheaths from the segment. The sample needs to be taken at random, but any plant with stalk rot should be discarded. The rot destroys the pith area of the stalk, rendering it dark brown to black. Notice the color of healthy stalks in the photo. Plants adjoining a skip should be avoided. Areas with different soil types or management histories (manure practices and previous legume crops such as alfalfa and clover) should be sampled separately. Hybrids with different maturities and widely different planting dates may require different sampling dates. Place samples in paper (not plastic) bags to allow some drying and minimize mold growth. Send to a laboratory as soon as possible. Refrigerate samples (do not freeze) if stored for more than a day before mailing. Most soil testing labs in your area will offer this test. For questions regarding shipping, cost and the test, contact your local soil testing lab. Although this test does not provide any remedy for the current year, familiarity with the data over a number of years including wet and drought years should assist producers in fine-tuning their nitrogen fertilizer practices. Source: Michigan State University Extension
Sugarcane Aphids Spreading Throughout the Texas Panhandle
While sugarcane aphid populations are still low in grain sorghum fields across the Texas High Plains, a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service specialist in Amarillo said they are beginning to establish and could reach treatable numbers. Dr. Ed Bynum, AgriLife Extension entomologist, said sugarcane aphid populations in the South Plains only recently reached economic levels in some fields that justified treatment with insecticides. Infestations in the field can be just a few aphids per plant to a thousand or more aphids per plant. Infestations were found the first week of August in sorghum fields in Parmer and Deaf Smith counties in Texas and DeBaca County in New Mexico. More sugarcane aphid presence has been reported this week in Moore, Sherman, Hansford and Ochiltree counties, he said. “We need to make sure producers are out checking their fields, scouting for the sugarcane aphid and are prepared when insecticide applications are warranted,” Bynum said. For identification purposes, the sugarcane aphid has dark cornicles, tips of antennae and feet, and no stripe down its back, he said. Their damage is caused by the piercing sucking mouthparts, which puts the plant in poor health and can keep it from fully developing. Excess plant sap during feeding is left on the leaves as a sticky substance called honeydew. A black sooty mold will grow on the honeydew causing a reduction of photosynthesis. AgriLife Extension entomologists have advised the threshold for the High Plains is to treat when: – 20 percent of plants have aphids in the pre-boot stage. – 20 percent of the plants have more than 50 aphids in the boot stage. – 30 percent infestation in the flowering-milk stage. – 30 percent infested with localized areas of heavy honeydew and established aphid colonies in soft dough and dough stages. – At black layer, when heavy honeydew and established aphid colonies are present, treat only for preventing harvest problems. Bynum said field trials have shown only two chemicals provide good control of the aphid. These products are Transform and Silvanto. Other insecticide products recommended for control have not proven to be effective in studies across Texas, he said. “Producers can control the sugarcane aphid if they stay on top of the situation and make timely applications,” Bynum said. For the most up-to-date news, sightings, recommendations on sampling and control, go to http://txscan.blogspot.com. Source: Texas AgriLife Extension
National
Another good week for Nebraska?s crops
All in all, it was another good week for Nebraska?s crops. Temperatures were average for mid-August and significant rainfall of an inch or more was received across most the state, although some central counties received up to six inches or more. Corn rated 63 percent good to excellent and 24 percent fair. Soybeans rated 61 percent good to excellent and 28 percent fair. Alfalfa condition rated 50 percent good to excellent. Continue reading Another good week for Nebraska’s crops at Brownfield Ag News.      
Iowa receives much needed rain
Much needed rain fell throughout the state of Iowa last week. ?Most of the state has seen some needed rain in the past week, but unfortunately it may be too little and too late for parts of south central and southeast Iowa that have already seen significant crop damage due to drought,? said Iowa ag secretary Bill Northey. ?Hopefully the rains and cool weather are helping boost corn and bean yields in other parts of the state that have received some moisture throughout the growing season.? The latest crop report rates the state?s corn 61 percent good to excellent and soybeans 58 percent good to excellent. Continue reading Iowa receives much needed rain at Brownfield Ag News.      
Wisconsin crops good overall, with some exceptions
An agronomist likes what he sees so far with Wisconsin?s corn and soybean crops.? Michael Weiss with DeKalb-Asgrow tells Brownfield he just toured fields in northwest Wisconsin. ?He says, “There’s a lot of really nice looking corn in that Polk County, Pierce County, St. Croix County area near Baldwin, Roberts, New Richmond. ?It looks really good and actually, I was in ten bean fields in the area looking for a problem and I?couldn?t find any.? In the eastern part of the state, the late planting and frequent wetness has had an impact on corn and soybeans. ? Continue reading Wisconsin crops good overall, with some exceptions at Brownfield Ag News.      
Cattle futures are playing the waiting game
On the Chicago Mercantile Exchange live cattle closed mostly lower and feeder cattle closed lower as they play the waiting game ahead of Tuesday?s Cold Storage report, Wednesday’s Fed Cattle Exchange, and Friday?s Cattle on Feed report from the USDA.? August live cattle closed down $.37 at $106.00 and October lives cattle ended the day down $.05 at $105.85.? August feeder cattle closed $.70 lower at $139.80 and September feeder cattle closed down $.87 at $139.15. Continue reading Cattle futures are playing the waiting game at Brownfield Ag News.      
Red Gold Stewardship award presented to Indiana, Ohio farmers
Two Indiana and Ohio farmers have received the Red Gold Stewardship Award for their commitment to using good stewardship practices. Harold and Tom Parker of H&T Parker Farms in LaPorte, Ind. and Chris McDonnall of McDonnall Farms in Delta, Ohio, were recognized for their commitment to conservation. Parker uses conservation practices like vertical tillage and cover crops to grow corn, seed corn, and tomatoes. McDonnall raises corn and soybeans and has been growing tomatoes and uses cover crops, grass filter strips, and water and sediment control basins to protect the soil and water. Continue reading Red Gold Stewardship award presented to Indiana, Ohio farmers at Brownfield Ag News.      
Rainfall provides some relief to Michigan crops
Rainfall in the southern part of Michigan provided stress relief to crops this week, however, additional rainfall is still needed. Joe Hirschman with Seed Consultants says crops in southwest Michigan are dry, but healthy. “Corn looks a little bit better than beans,” he says. “Beans are finally putting on the height that they needed. They started out really, really short and maintained it for a long time- almost stunted.” According to the latest USDA Crop and Weather report, 56 percent of the corn crop was rated good to excellent. Continue reading Rainfall provides some relief to Michigan crops at Brownfield Ag News.      
Ohio crops: corn 60%; soybeans 54% good to excellent
Warmer temperatures and varied precipitation across Ohio are adding stress to the crops this week. Many areas had little rainfall while other areas, like southwestern and southeastern Ohio experienced heavy rainfall. According to the latest USDA Crop and Weather report, 60 percent of the corn crop was rated good to excellent. The report showed that 70 percent of the crop is in the dough stage, and 16 percent is dented. Soybeans are rated 54 percent good to excellent. Continue reading Ohio crops: corn 60%; soybeans 54% good to excellent at Brownfield Ag News.      
Hoosiers recognized at Celebration of Agriculture
Four Hoosiers were recently recognized for their leadership and commitment to Indiana agriculture. Lt. Governor Suzanne Crouch presented Beth Bechdol and Jay Akridge with the 2017 AgriVision Award during the Celebration of Agriculture at the Indiana State Fair. Crouch says their passion and expertise has led to countless innovations, and they represent the very best of Indiana agriculture. Bechdol is director of agribusiness strategies at Ice Miller and president and CEO of AgriNovus Indiana. Continue reading Hoosiers recognized at Celebration of Agriculture at Brownfield Ag News.      
CRISPR technology presents opportunities for farmers
An Indiana farmer says a new genome technology could help farmers improve field crops. Mike Seib learned more about the CRISPR gene-editing technology during a recent conference in California. He says he?s excited about the advancements this technology will eventually offer farmers. “We might be able to end pesticides to a certain degree and we might be able to eliminate different things, maybe even?to the point of herbicides,” he says. Continue reading CRISPR technology presents opportunities for farmers at Brownfield Ag News.      
Rainfall good for some Minnesota farmers, bad for others
Widespread rainfall benefited some Minnesota farmers last week while others could have problems from excess moisture. In its latest crop progress report, the USDA says there were less than three days suitable for fieldwork?the fewest since late May. Farm management analyst Kent Thiesse says the Redwood Falls area received up to 10 inches of rain recently. “When you get standing water in fields late in the growing season, that can lead to some root-rot diseases developing and lead to some late-season problems.? Continue reading Rainfall good for some Minnesota farmers, bad for others at Brownfield Ag News.      
Minnesota draft Nitrogen Fertilizer Rule comment period ends Aug. 25th
Minnesota farmers only have a few more days to comment on a proposed rule that could limit the use of nitrogen fertilizer. Matt Wohlman, deputy commissioner for the Minnesota Department of Agriculture (MDA), says they?ve heard from a wide variety of stakeholders. “There are concerns about certain parts of the Rule, particularly in northwestern Minnesota where there’s some concern about the way that we classify coarse-textured soils.” The comment period for the draft Nitrogen Fertilizer Rule ends August 25th. Continue reading Minnesota draft Nitrogen Fertilizer Rule comment period ends Aug. 25th at Brownfield Ag News.      
Pleasant, late-Summer pattern for the Corn Belt
Over the next few days, the cold front descending from the upper Midwest will gradually move into the Southeast, generating locally strong thunderstorms and with it the potential for localized flooding in advance of a drier, somewhat cooler air mass. An elevated risk of severe weather is already anticipated Tuesday for the Ohio Valley and other locations along the front. Elsewhere, drier albeit cooler weather will dominate the northern Plains once Monday?s showers dissipate, with daytime highs expected to stay below 80? over much of North Dakota. Continue reading Pleasant, late-Summer pattern for the Corn Belt at Brownfield Ag News.      
No harm reported done in NAFTA 2.0 round 1
U.S. trade representative Robert Lighthizer opened NAFTA renegotiation talks with a tough but optimistic tone, saying NAFTA has fundamentally failed. Adding, ?We look forward to productive discussions over the next several months.? The first round with Canada and Mexico ended with an agreement to move quickly. Several dozen negotiating topics reportedly were covered, including sanitary and phytosanitary rules in ag trade. Arkansas Farm Bureau president Terry Veach tells Agri-Pulse that discussion closely followed provisions in the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) including protections for trade in biotech crops. Continue reading No harm reported done in NAFTA 2.0 round 1 at Brownfield Ag News.      
Mo Farm Bureau on PSC ruling
The Missouri Public Service commission has denied Clean Line Energy the use of Eminent Domain power for its Grain Belt Express Powerline. The decision is supported by the Missouri Farm Bureau and has been a priority of the organization. Farm Bureau president Blake Hurst says, they ?ARE concerned by issues raised by some commissioners who expressed disappointment in a related court ruling requiring consent by all affected counties.? Missouri Farm Bureau will seek to strengthen protections restricting the use of eminent domain power. Continue reading Mo Farm Bureau on PSC ruling at Brownfield Ag News.      
Midday cash livestock markets
Direct cash cattle trade is at a standstill with action limited to the distribution of new showlists.? Showlists appear to be mixed ? larger in Texas, smaller in Nebraska and Kansas, and unchanged in Colorado.? Overall the offering looks smaller than last week.? This week?s trade will likely follow last week?s suit and be postponed until Wednesday ? or later. ?The Cattle on Feed report comes out on Friday. Boxed beef cutouts are weak with light box movement.? Continue reading Midday cash livestock markets at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
1,200-plus Visitors Gather at Missouri Dairy for Eclipse
Rain, thunder and storm clouds couldn’t scare off the eclipse and the more than 1,200 people who attended a viewing party at a Missouri dairy. ​
Western Scouts Still Looking for Perfect Corn
Scouts on the western leg of the Farm Journal Midwest Crop Tour are still in search of a perfect corn field after crossing South Dakota off their list and moving into Nebraska.
Crop Tour Could Lift 'Shadow of Doubt' on Grain Markets
It’s fitting a one-in-a-lifetime total solar eclipse crossed part of the 2017 Farm Journal Midwest Crop Tour path. Will this historical astronomical event align with a grain-market-altering event?
Soybean Conditions Improve Slightly, Corn Stays Steady
Overall, the national soybean rating gained a point to 60% good-excellent. 
Crop Tour Day 1: Variability at Every Stop
Farm Journal Midwest Crop Tour scouts are visiting Ohio, Indiana, South Dakota and Nebraska to estimate yields for each state. Early season weather, issues at pollination and other challenges have led to extreme variability in corn and moderate variability in soybeans.
U.S. Official: India not Keeping Pace with Peers like China in Adopting Farm Tech
India is not keeping pace with its peers like China in adopting innovative farm technologies, especially biotechnology, a U.S. embassy official said today on FinancialExpress.com,?cautioning that the country?s agri import may rise if crop yields are not raised. The comments come against the backdrop of US biotech major Monsanto Indian arm?s legal battle with the government and domestic seed companies over the royalty issue and logjam over allowing genetically modified food crops such as mustard and brinjal for commercial cultivation. Speaking to the media about India?s unrealized agriculture potential, the official here said: ?We have a perspective that India is not keeping pace with its peers ? China, Vietnam and others when it comes to ensuring farmers have access to world-class innovative technologies.? Innovative technologies, including biotechnology, are required to boost crop yields, which in India at present are much lower than neighbouring countries, he said. Wheat yields are at 3 tonnes per hectare in India as against 5 tonnes in China. Rice yields are at 4 tonnes per hectare here while it is 7 tonnes in China and 6 tonnes in Vietnam, he added. Without referring to the Monsanto?s ongoing legal dispute specifically, the official said there is a feeling among many people here that biotechnology is not good though dozens of countries around the globe have experienced great success. Read the full story on FinancialExpress.com.
AMVAC Grants Trimble Global Distribution Rights for SIMPAS
American Vanguard Corp., has?announced that its wholly owned subsidiary, AMVAC Chemical Corp., signed a non-binding Memorandum of Understanding with Trimble Inc. The two companies are working toward an agreement that will grant Trimble Inc. global distribution rights for the patented SIMPAS prescriptive application equipment from AMVAC. The SIMPAS distribution agreement is expected to be completed by the end of 2017. The Smart Integrated Multi-Product Prescription Application System (SIMPAS) is a multi-product variable rate system that will be controlled by a Trimble display to automate and variably apply multiple inputs across a field. SIMPAS application equipment makes it easy to prescriptively apply multiple in-furrow dry and/or liquid products (insecticides, nematicides, fungicides, nutritionals and/or biologicals) while planting. SIMPAS enables farmers to apply the right product, at the right time, at the right place, at the right rate. Under the future distribution agreement, the Trimble Vantage distribution network will facilitate easy installation and servicing of the SIMPAS technology throughout North America and across other global markets. Through the use of Trimble application control and software integration, farmers will experience SIMPAS compatibility with a wide range of precision ag equipment. According to Bob Trogele, Chief Operating Officer AMVAC, ?Combining the low-dose-rate accuracy of the AMVAC-designed SIMPAS application equipment with the strength of Trimble precision guidance controls and farm management solutions is the first step toward optimum stewardship of in-furrow applied crop inputs. Delivering SIMPAS equipment and connectivity to farmers through the same network of Trimble Vantage distributors that support the existing fleet of Trimble ag equipment ensures each SIMPAS system will be backed by people whose primary mission every day is to make precision ag work at the local farm level.? ?Farmers will be able to control and manage multiple inputs across each field from the convenience of the cab with the SIMPAS application equipment and a Trimble display,? said Darryl Matthews, Trimble Senior Vice President. ?Making sure SIMPAS as-applied data is easily integrated into the Trimble Ag Software platform closes the loop to ensure farmers and their trusted advisors can easily access, share, and analyze the data that?s created when products are applied using SIMPAS equipment.?
Alabama Farm Boy Takes Over as Forest Service Chief
Today, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue announced that Tony Tooke will become the new Chief of the U.S. Forest Service. Tooke, who grew up on a 200-acre farm outside Detroit, Ala., has been with the Forest Service since he was 18.
Crop Tour Scouts Weigh-In on Expectations
The Farm Journal Midwest Crop Tour gets underway today, with four long-time scouts weighing in on what they expect to see in their own fields.
Wild Markets Close Barrel, Block Spread
Strong demand and slower milk growth both good signs for milk prices.
Syngenta to Launch Enhanced Liquid Corn Insecticide
This photo shows the superior flowability of Force Evo (left), compared to the thicker Force CS formulation (right). Syngenta announced Force Evo, an enhanced liquid corn insecticide, is registered by the Environmental Protection Agency and will replace Force CS, starting in the 2018 growing season. ?Force CS was a very effective insecticide for control of corn rootworm (CRW) and other early-season pests, but its liquid formulation had some challenges with handling and application,? said John Koenig, insecticide technical product lead at Syngenta. ?After listening to growers? concerns, we knew a more sophisticated, high-performing liquid formulation was needed for improved handling and increased at-plant efficiency.? After rigorous lab and field testing, Koenig said he?s excited about the performance and convenience Force Evo will deliver. ?Force Evo has four times lower viscosity than Force CS, providing better cold-weather tolerance and freeze-thaw performance for improved insecticide pumping and flowability,? Koenig said. ?In addition, it?s compatible with 47 liquid starter fertilizers, allowing hassle-free use through existing closed, direct-injection application systems from John Deere and Raven.? Among the three farmers from across the Midwest who were able to trial Force Evo this season was Michael Geurts of Marshall, Minnesota. ?What I really like about the new product is the ease of mixing with our liquid starter fertilizer,? said Geurts. ?I?ve trusted Force for years as far as the insect protection it delivers, but Force Evo will give me the convenience I like of a liquid insecticide. Being able to load the boxes, couple the hoses and start planting knowing your roots will be protected is an investment worth making.? Koenig said equipment cleanout will also be easier with Force Evo, since trials show it leaves four-to- six times less residue on equipment surfaces. ?At Syngenta, we listen to what growers are saying, which has a direct impact on the improvements we make,? said Koenig. ?With Force Evo, growers will continue to see top-rated control of early-season pests, like corn rootworm, but have a better user experience.?  
Yet the darkness could not prevail
California Pursues New Health Protections on Chlorpyrifos
The California Environmental Protection Agency (CalEPA) announced on Friday that both the California Department of Pesticide Regulations and the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment are pursuing health protections on one of the most widely used agricultural pesticides in the nation, chlorpyrifos. The Department of Pesticide Regulation (DPR) released today an updated draft risk assessment for public comment. This action marks the start of a public and scientific review of the document, which could lead to increased restrictions on chlorpyrifos statewide. DPR is currently developing interim restrictions on use of the pesticide and recommendations will be made to county agricultural commissioners next month. In addition, the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment (OEHHA) is referring chlorpyrifos for potential listing as a developmental toxicant under Proposition 65. OEHHA today posted an announcement that the state?s Developmental and Reproductive Toxicant Identification Committee will consider the listing of chlorpyrifos at its next public meeting. ?While chlorpyrifos has been protecting crops for more than 50 years, new information in the scientific community leads us to believe the level of risk it poses is greater than previously known,? said CalEPA Secretary Matthew Rodriquez. ?We need to better understand the science to ensure our actions protect public health. The actions we are taking today reflect our commitment to the health and safety of all Californians, and the environment.? Department of Pesticide Regulation DPR scientists believe chlorpyrifos may pose a public health risk as a toxic air contaminant based on its assessment of the latest studies in the scientific community. However, this new finding, indicated in the updated draft risk assessment has not been peer reviewed and must go through a public comment period and be independently evaluated by other scientists. On September 15, DPR will hold a public workshop on the updated draft risk assessment at the Pesticide Registration and Evaluation Committee meeting in Sacramento. After the 45-day written public comment period, which begins today, DPR?s updated draft risk assessment will go before an independent panel of nine scientists known as the Scientific Review Panel (SRP).?The thorough review process, which may ultimately lead to more restrictions on use, may conclude in December 2018. Next month, DPR will provide county agricultural commissioners with specific interim recommendations, including: Increasing distances between sites where the chemical is applied and sensitive locations, such as homes and schools. These would be specific to each type of application method. New restrictions on methods used to apply chlorpyrifos. Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment OEHHA will soon open a written public comment period on scientific materials that describe the evidence for the developmental toxicity of chlorpyrifos.? OEHHA will provide the materials and the written public comments to the Developmental and Reproductive Toxicant Identification Committee. The committee is an independent panel of 10 scientific experts that determines whether chemicals are added to the Proposition 65 list as causing birth defects and other reproductive harm. The committee will also consider public comments presented at its November 29 meeting. If the committee adds chlorpyrifos to the Proposition 65 list as a developmental toxicant, businesses that knowingly cause exposures above minimum levels must provide a Proposition 65 warning. DPR?s updated draft risk assessment and other documents relating to chlorpyrifos are available at: http://www.cdpr.ca.gov/docs/whs/active_ingredient/chlorpyrifos.htm OEHHA?s notice of the November 29 meeting of the Developmental and Reproductive Toxicant Identification Committee concerning chlorpyrifos is available at: www.oehha.ca.gov.
My Final 2016 Bean Positions Summarized
Flash Sales of Soybeans this Morning