@C - CORN - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Dec '17 345'6 344'0 345'0 -0'2
Mar '18 357'6 355'6 357'0 0'0
May '18 366'0 364'0 365'2 0'0
Jul '18 374'0 372'0 373'2 0'0
Sep '18 381'0 379'4 380'6 0'2
Dec '18 389'4 387'6 389'2 0'2
@S - SOYBEANS - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Jan '18 997'4 994'2 997'2 0'0
Mar '18 1008'6 1005'4 1008'2 -0'2
May '18 1018'2 1015'2 1018'0 -0'2
Jul '18 1026'2 1023'2 1026'0 -0'2
Aug '18 1026'4 1023'6 1026'2 0'0
Sep '18 1018'0 1009'2 1016'0 6'6
Nov '18 1007'4 1004'4 1007'4 0'4
@K - HARD RED WINTER WHEAT - KCBT
Month High Low Last Chg
Dec '17 421'2 417'6 419'0 -2'0
Mar '18 438'6 435'2 436'4 -2'0
May '18 451'6 448'6 449'4 -2'0
Jul '18 469'4 466'2 467'4 -2'0
@L - LIVE CATTLE - CME
Month High Low Last Chg
Dec '17 119.175 118.775 118.925 -0.125
Feb '18 125.400 124.850 124.950 -0.525
@C - COTTON #2 - ICEFU
Month High Low Last Chg
Dec '17 71.81 70.60 71.60 0.86
Mar '18 71.66 71.07 71.49 0.35
May '18 72.47 71.92 72.37 0.39
DTN Click here for info on Exchange delays.
Local
Select the Perfect Christmas Tree
Many people recall nostalgic memories of selecting a Christmas tree with their families. “When I was growing up in Peoria, Illinois,” says Ron Wolford, a University of Illinois Extension horticulture educator, “our family would cut down a Christmas tree growing on my grandparent’s farm.” Today, you can purchase trees from garden centers, pop-up lots, big box stores, and Christmas tree farms. Wolford shares the following tips to help you select a fresh tree for your home and keep it looking its best throughout the holiday season. Before you even head out to buy the tree, pick a spot in your home to place it. Ask yourself a couple of questions: Will the tree be seen from all sides or will some of it be against a wall? Choose a tree that fits where it will be displayed. For example, if the tree is in front of a large window, then all four sides need to look as good as possible. If the tree is against a wall, a tree with three good sides should be fine. A tree with two good sides would work well in a corner. “Purchasing a tree from a Christmas tree farm ensures that you will have a fresh tree and the more perfect a tree, the more expensive it will be,” Wolford says. Pick a spot away from heat sources, such as heaters, fireplaces, TVs, radiators, and air vents. “A dried-out tree is a safety hazard,” he says. Measure the height and width of the space you have available in the room where the tree will be placed. “There is nothing worse than bringing a tree indoors only to find it’s too tall. Take a tape measure with you to the farm,” Wolford says. If buying from a retail lot, Wolford recommends going during the day. “Choosing a tree in daylight is a much easier experience than trying to pick out a tree in a dimly lit lot,” he says. When looking for the freshest tree among the dozens lining the lot, Wolford recommends these telltale signs of a healthy tree: A recently cut tree will have a healthy green appearance with few browning needles. Needles should be flexible and not fall off if you run a branch through your hand. Raise the tree a few inches off the ground and drop it on the butt end. Very few green needles should drop off the tree. It is normal for a few inner brown needles to fall. Make sure the handle or base of the tree is straight and long enough so that it will fit easily into your stand. “Store your tree in an unheated garage or some other area out of the wind, if you are not putting it up right away,” Wolford recommends. “Make a fresh, one-inch cut on the butt end and place the tree in a bucket of warm water. When you bring the tree indoors, make another fresh one-inch cut and place the tree in a sturdy stand. The water reservoir of the stand should contain one quart of water for every inch of diameter of the trunk.” Keep the water level above the base of the tree. If the base dries out, resin will form over the cut end and the tree will not be able to absorb water and will dry out quickly. Commercially prepared mixes, sugar, aspirin, or other additives to the water are not necessary. Research has shown that plain water will keep a tree fresh, Wolford says. For more information, visit the University of Illinois Extension website “Christmas Trees & More” at http://extension.illinois.edu/trees/index.cfm. Source: University of Illinois
National
Consider variable cash rent
Farm income is down to a fraction of what it was a few years ago, and cash rents are a big part of input costs.? University of Illinois farm management specialist Gary Schnitkey suggests working out a land rental agreement that could be good for the land owner and the renter.? In the face of lower farm income projections, Schnitkey suggests renegotiating cash rent arrangements into variable, or flexible cash rent.? The arrangement is based on some measure of farm productivity, such as yield, market price or a combination. Continue reading Consider variable cash rent at Brownfield Ag News.      
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During this time of Thanksgiving, we give thanks for you ? our ...
During this time of Thanksgiving, we give thanks for you ? our farmer-owners. We value your patronage and appreciate your confidence in us. On behalf of everyone at Aurora Cooperative, we wish you a very Happy Thanksgiving.>
>
Our Bertrand location did it's annual hats and gloves drive for all ...
Our Bertrand location did it's annual hats and gloves drive for all kindergarten students in the local schools! The Bertrand and Loomis students were excited to get new hats and gloves to keep them warm on the playground! #yourfuture>
Corn, soybeans, and wheat are all a little firmer to end the week. ...
Corn, soybeans, and wheat are all a little firmer to end the week. The market is anticipating that this afternoon's Commitment of Traders report will show near record short positions in the corn market. Market participants are starting to thin as traders trim positions ahead of next week?s holiday shortened week. With limited fresh news, CBOT traders are looking for a quick short covering day to offer support as we close out the week. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn +2, Soybeans +4, KC Wheat +4.>
Today, the Crop Science division of Bayer released results from an ...
Today, the Crop Science division of Bayer released results from an independent market research survey, revealing that the LibertyLink? system was the highest rated trait platform of the year.>
Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for two full-time with ...
Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for two full-time with benefits Propane/Fuel Delivery drivers. One position in the St. Paul area and one in the Gibbon area. CDL required and have to be able to obtain hazmat endorsement. Click here to apply: http://auroracoop.com/ContactUs>
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Come by and see us at the Gateway Farm Expo in Kearney!
Come by and see us at the Gateway Farm Expo in Kearney!>
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Thank you to all veterans including our employees and their family ...
Thank you to all veterans including our employees and their family members for serving our country and protecting our freedoms #VeteransDay2017>
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Thanks for sharing!
Thanks for sharing!>
Come visit us at our tailgate today! Fire is hot and the chili is ...
Come visit us at our tailgate today! Fire is hot and the chili is warm!! GBR! ??
This is so true!
This is so true!>
Great photo!! Thanks for sharing it with us!
Great photo!! Thanks for sharing it with us!>
Local
Select the Perfect Christmas Tree
Many people recall nostalgic memories of selecting a Christmas tree with their families. “When I was growing up in Peoria, Illinois,” says Ron Wolford, a University of Illinois Extension horticulture educator, “our family would cut down a Christmas tree growing on my grandparent’s farm.” Today, you can purchase trees from garden centers, pop-up lots, big box stores, and Christmas tree farms. Wolford shares the following tips to help you select a fresh tree for your home and keep it looking its best throughout the holiday season. Before you even head out to buy the tree, pick a spot in your home to place it. Ask yourself a couple of questions: Will the tree be seen from all sides or will some of it be against a wall? Choose a tree that fits where it will be displayed. For example, if the tree is in front of a large window, then all four sides need to look as good as possible. If the tree is against a wall, a tree with three good sides should be fine. A tree with two good sides would work well in a corner. “Purchasing a tree from a Christmas tree farm ensures that you will have a fresh tree and the more perfect a tree, the more expensive it will be,” Wolford says. Pick a spot away from heat sources, such as heaters, fireplaces, TVs, radiators, and air vents. “A dried-out tree is a safety hazard,” he says. Measure the height and width of the space you have available in the room where the tree will be placed. “There is nothing worse than bringing a tree indoors only to find it’s too tall. Take a tape measure with you to the farm,” Wolford says. If buying from a retail lot, Wolford recommends going during the day. “Choosing a tree in daylight is a much easier experience than trying to pick out a tree in a dimly lit lot,” he says. When looking for the freshest tree among the dozens lining the lot, Wolford recommends these telltale signs of a healthy tree: A recently cut tree will have a healthy green appearance with few browning needles. Needles should be flexible and not fall off if you run a branch through your hand. Raise the tree a few inches off the ground and drop it on the butt end. Very few green needles should drop off the tree. It is normal for a few inner brown needles to fall. Make sure the handle or base of the tree is straight and long enough so that it will fit easily into your stand. “Store your tree in an unheated garage or some other area out of the wind, if you are not putting it up right away,” Wolford recommends. “Make a fresh, one-inch cut on the butt end and place the tree in a bucket of warm water. When you bring the tree indoors, make another fresh one-inch cut and place the tree in a sturdy stand. The water reservoir of the stand should contain one quart of water for every inch of diameter of the trunk.” Keep the water level above the base of the tree. If the base dries out, resin will form over the cut end and the tree will not be able to absorb water and will dry out quickly. Commercially prepared mixes, sugar, aspirin, or other additives to the water are not necessary. Research has shown that plain water will keep a tree fresh, Wolford says. For more information, visit the University of Illinois Extension website “Christmas Trees & More” at http://extension.illinois.edu/trees/index.cfm. Source: University of Illinois
Farmers Have Unique Tax Bill Concerns
Farm lobbyists are warily watching the tax-overhaul legislation moving through Congress, which comes with some favorable terms for them now but may have a big catch later: Less money for farm programs crucial to producers dealing with lower commodity prices. The farm groups are looking beyond the tax debate to a new farm law due in 2018 that could get squeezed if a bigger deficit caused by tax cuts makes less money available for farmers. Multiple independent analyses of the Republican tax plan anticipate it would boost the federal budget deficit by as much as $1.5 trillion over 10 years. A Congressional Budget Office report released last week concluded that it would trigger automatic spending cuts of as much as $136 billion in the current fiscal year. One of the programs at risk in that scenario is $9.5 billion in farm subsidies, according to the National Farmers Union, the second-biggest U.S. farmer group. “By far our biggest concern is what does this do to the deficit, and how does that impact upcoming farm bills,” said Roger Johnson, president of the National Farmers Union in Washington. “If we blow a $1.5 trillion hole in the deficit, will people be saying a month later, ‘We need to scale back the farm bill?’” Some provisions of the tax bill are popular across farm groups that have quietly lobbied for favorable treatment. Both the House and Senate packages allow for faster depreciation of farm equipment, and neither would subject rental income to self-employment tax, an early House provision agriculture fought against. Right direction The bill isn’t perfect for agriculture — both plans repeal a tax deduction used by agricultural cooperatives to help finance a corporate tax-rate cut. But overall, the plans in Congress are moving in a direction the farmers can get behind, said Farm Bureau Federation President Zippy Duvall. According to federal lobbying data, the sector is the 10th-largest in the U.S. and larger than transportation. “America’s farmers and ranchers are ready for a tax system that recognizes their hard work and the unique challenges they face while reducing the tax burden that threatens their livelihoods,” Duvall, who heads the largest U.S. farmer group, said in a statement. But deficit-boosting tax legislation may mean less money for other programs — bad timing for farmers seeking to boost federal aid when passing a new farm law due Sept. 30. The law reauthorizes all U.S. Department of Agriculture programs, including the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program and farm subsidies. SNAP, also called food stamps, is protected from deficit-reducing cuts under congressional rules. Farm payments are not. Farm profits have fallen for the past three years, with corn, the biggest U.S. crop, selling at less than half its record price in 2012. Land value gains have stagnated after a decade-long run-up, and debt levels have risen. That may make federal spending a bigger priority for many farmers than tax cuts, according to Harwood Schaffer, an agricultural economist at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. Farmers are an important part of Republican tax-cut messaging because they’re sympathetic representatives of American business to the general public, he said. But the package proposed may not be as important to farmers facing extreme financial pressure from low prices as a generous farm bill would be, he said. “It’s hard to benefit from a tax cut on your profits when you don’t have a profit,” he said. Agriculture groups are pushing to largely keep current subsidies to growers of corn, wheat and other crops in place, while possibly adding new programs for dairy and cotton producers. A deficit-boosting tax measure may be counter to meeting those goals, Johnson said. “By far I’m most concerned about the deficit,” he said. “If tax reform goes nowhere, there will be enormous political pressure to pass a farm bill next year, just for Congress to show it can get something done,” he said. “That pressure goes away if it passes, and it also could mean less money for a farm bill. That deficit could really destroy us,” he said. Source: Alex Bjerga, Southwest Farm Press
Water Use, Drought-tolerant Hybrids Still Key to Dryland Crop Production
Risk management is the name of the game when it comes to growing dryland sorghum and corn, which both offer cropping alternatives “when and if” conditions are right, according to recent Texas A&M AgriLife studies. Side-by-side dryland grain sorghum and dryland corn studies were planted this past season at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research station near Bushland by Dr. Qingwu Xue, Texas A&M AgriLife Research plant physiologist in Amarillo, and Dr. Jourdan Bell, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service agronomist in Amarillo. First-year results indicate hybrids and planting date both make a difference in water use by the crops and thus, yields at the end of the season. Xue and Bell scheduled planting of the two projects at two different dates to determine the viability of dryland diversification in the High Plains, and to gain understanding on the difference it made in water use. They also looked at how various hybrids of each crop performed under dryland conditions. At Bushland, the sorghum project was funded by the Texas Grain Sorghum Producers Board and the corn study was funded by the Texas Corn Producers Board. Dr. Calvin Trostle, AgriLife Extension agronomist at Lubbock, also had a separate dryland corn versus dryland sorghum project at Lubbock, but not all the sorghum plots have been harvested. “Dryland production systems in this region are becoming more important because irrigated agriculture is facing the challenge of declining water resources from the Ogallala Aquifer,” Xue said. “We’ve been dealing with this issue for decades, but if you look at the future, I think dryland cropping systems will be more and more important,” he said. “Our research goal is to improve water use and drought tolerance in crops under dryland systems.” With above average rainfall the last two years, many producers have inquired about hybrids and populations for dryland corn, Bell said. So it is important to conduct a multiyear trial to evaluate production trends of dryland corn in order to capture the yield potential under different environments. Trostle said at this point, “We believe that unless a grower has substantial deep soil moisture in place, they should not plant dryland corn. This is partly due to the seed cost for dryland corn, which can run six to eight times of that for dryland sorghum.” At Bushland, the researchers wanted to determine the effect of planting date on the two crops under dryland conditions. Additionally, the study included different hybrids and planting densities, especially for corn. “If we do not beat the heat during early vegetative stages, we have affected the ear formation, and if we do not beat the heat during pollination, we have essentially lost all our yield potential,” Bell said. “Late season precipitation is also another component of the later date.” Xue said the first planting date targeted was late April or early May, which is relatively early for grain sorghum but not too early for corn. Both crops were planted May 5 at the same location. May precipitation was fair, but “we experienced extremely hot and dry conditions in the middle of June through mid-July,” Xue said. “We also had a hailstorm in early July. While the dryland sorghum survived it pretty well, the dryland corn was severely hit by the hail. Plus the drought and the heat on the first planting of dryland corn set it back.” The second planting was in late June, he said. Both crops did great and had very high yield potential for a dryland system due to the abundant rainfall from the end of July to September. Unfortunately, the late-planted grain sorghum was infested by sugarcane aphids. “So in terms of managing dryland sorghum here is a dilemma: if you planted early, then you didn’t have any sugarcane aphid infestation because the sorghum matured before their arrival,” Xue said. “But the yield potential was low because of the dry, hot conditions and some hail damage. “The second planting, because of abundant rains in August, had a very high yield potential until the sugarcane aphids came around the middle of August. In our plots, the leaves were filled with aphids in September, but we still had good yield potential.” The June-planted corn was late in this region, but Xue said he saw great yield potential given the particular conditions this year. Summarizing, he said this year the later planting date was best for both dryland sorghum and corn in terms of yields. Producers wanting to manage sugarcane aphid infestations without spraying would be advised to plant early. Those with late-planted sorghum should plan to scout the field and spray to protect yield potential and prevent difficulties during harvest. This year’s hot and dry conditions and physical damage from hail affected the yields in both early planted crops, Xue said, but also gave them a good opportunity to evaluate the differences in drought tolerance among sorghum and corn hybrids. The identification of drought-tolerant hybrids is very important to producers. “Our early planted dryland sorghum yields averaged 25 bushels per acre, but late-planted sorghum averaged 70 bushels per acre,” he said. “It is important to note neither the early or late-planted sorghum was sprayed for sugarcane aphids. This data shows dryland production risks are magnified by not controlling sugarcane aphids; however, the early planted sorghum was not affected by aphids.” Preliminary data show the average yield for the first planting date of corn was 21 bushels per acre with no differences between hybrids or populations. Yields in the second planting date ranged from 54 to 99 bushels per acre. With over 12 inches of rain primarily in August, it was a very good crop in terms of the dryland corn, Xue said. “Ultimately, dryland crop production can be risky for all crops,” he said. “The production potential is highly dependent on the management, although this may affect the profitability. In sorghum, the risk can be magnified by not controlling aphids in addition to seasonal variation. With corn, the risk is a higher crop water demand, which is often not met with in-season precipitation.” “This is just for 2017,” Xue stressed. “We will repeat the same studies in 2018 and weather patterns could be very different. Nevertheless, it is really important for producers to understand and be able to manage risks. This field research is aimed at helping them do that.” Source: Texas AgriLife Extension
Soils and Your Thanksgiving Meal
Did you know soil scientists are making your Thanksgiving dinner more sustainable? The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) Soils Matter blog explains research to make cranberries, poultry litter, and sweet potatoes better for the environment. Blog author Laura Christianson is an assistant professor at University of Illinois-Urbana Department of Crop Sciences. “This Thanksgiving is a good time to be thankful for all these scientists who are changing the world,” she says. “Their research – and its application – ensures that we can continue to feed the global population with nutritious crops. All this while looking out for our environment, too!” Cranberries: Research teams are testing methods to reduce the amount of phosphorus that runs off from the bogs. Poultry litter: This natural waste product is chock-full of nutrients that can help grow crops. However, the nutrients can easily leach out of the litter and pollute waterways. Scientists work to develop ways to capture excess nutrients continues. Sweet potatoes: Jamaican researchers are investigating how to better predict sweet potato yields. This research will help this region achieve food and nutrition security. Other scientists are closely studying the genetics of yams. The goal is to improve the genetic diversity of and breeding efforts for this important starchy tuber. To read the entire blog post, visit https://soilsmatter.wordpress.com/2017/11/15/soils-and-your-thanksgiving-meal/. Follow SSSA on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/SSSA.soils, Twitter at SSSA_Soils. SSSA has soils information on www.soils.org/discover-soils, for teachers at www.soils4teachers.org, and for students through 12thgrade, www.soils4kids.org. Source: Morning Ag Clips
FMCSA Issues 90-day Waiver of ELD Mandate
At a briefing held Monday at the Department of Transportation (DOT), the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) announced it would grant a 90-day waiver from the Electronic Logging Devices (ELDs) mandate for all transporters of agricultural commodities. The 90-day period begins on December 18, 2017 and will allow the Agency additional time to review the recently filed exemption requests from the Agricultural Retailers Association and the National Pork Producers Council, of which USCA and other livestock groups jointly-filed. FMCSA also announced its plan to open a public comment period related to the application of the agricultural commodity hours-of-service exemption and to clarify the existing 150 air-miles hours-of-service exemption to enforcement officers and industry. USCA’s Transportation Committee Chairman Steve Hilker issued the following statement: “During our trip to Washington, D.C. this year, we sat down with FMCSA personnel to discuss how the implementation of ELDs would present unique challenges for livestock haulers. We’re pleased that they have continued that conversation by issuing this 90-day waiver to fully evaluate how our industry can comply with this regulation. We’re confident that upon further examination, the Administration will find that livestock haulers need additional flexibility in the mandate, specifically in the restrictive Hours-of-Service (HOS) rules. USCA will continue to be an active participant in these discussions and asks its members to do the same by submitting comments and keeping pressure on their elected officials to support the industry in securing these needed changes.” Source: Morning Ag Clips
During this time of Thanksgiving, we give thanks for you ? our ...
During this time of Thanksgiving, we give thanks for you ? our farmer-owners. We value your patronage and appreciate your confidence in us. On behalf of everyone at Aurora Cooperative, we wish you a very Happy Thanksgiving.>
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Iowa Offers Incentive to Farmers Who Plant Cover Crops
Iowa, which has been embroiled in controversies over agricultural runoff and water-quality issues, has announced a novel program to give farmers who plant cover crops a $5-per-acre discount on their crop insurance over the next three years, according to the Natural Resources Defense Council. The three-year demonstration project is a partnership of the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship (IDALS) and the USDA Risk Management Agency (RMA), which administers crop insurance. Cover crops are important because they soak up excess nutrients in the soil, especially during wet winter months, when fertilizer leaches out of bare fields and into waterways. Nitrogen turns to nitrate when it hits the water, fouling drinking water sources and also contributing to toxic algal blooms in lakes and rivers. Much of this excess fertilizer flows into the Mississippi River and then the Gulf of Mexico, prompting the creation of a dead zone ach year that depletes oxygen in the water and chokes off aquatic life. “Just by planting cover crops, we could reduce nitrates loading to source water by 28% and phosphorus by 50%, according to Iowa’s Nutrient Reduction Strategy,” NRDC said. “Yet, cover crops are only used on about 2.5% of American cropland (only 1.4% of Iowa cropland), according to the 2012 Census of Agriculture. This is partly because it takes time and money for farmers to use cover crops effectively, and they may be wary of trying a new practice without a financial incentive.” NRDC said Iowa is working with the USDA’s RMA to cover part of the farmers’ insurance premiums, though the actual cost of the insurance isn’t changing. Currently, about 80% of Iowa’s cropland is insured through the federal crop insurance program. NRDC said it has worked with Practical Farmers of Iowa, the Iowa Farmers Union, and the Iowa Environmental Council to support this effort. Source: Chuck Abbott, Agriculture.com
Be Sure to Check Your Corn Silage for Mycotoxins
Corn silage samples from across the entirety of the U.S. in 2017 have shown extremely high levels of mycotoxins, particularly deoxynivalenol (DON), type A trichothecenes (T-2), fusaric acid and fumonisin. Mycotoxins are a regular concern for producers, as they influence feed quality and animal safety. They are produced by certain species of molds and can have toxic properties that impact animal health and performance. “Understanding the risk of mycotoxins and combinations of mycotoxins, even at lower levels, allows livestock owners and managers to institute a management program for more optimum performance and health,” said Dr. Max Hawkins, nutritionist with the Alltech Mycotoxin Management team. “Testing feedstuffs and finished feeds is paramount to putting this management program in action.” Mycotoxins are seldom found in isolation, and when multiple mycotoxins are consumed, they may have additive, or even synergistic, interactions that increase the overall risk to performance and health. As a result, an animal may have a stronger response than what would be expected if it was only experiencing a single mycotoxin challenge. It is important to conduct a mycotoxin analysis on feedstuffs harvested in 2017. The analysis should identify the storage mycotoxins, including Penicillium and Aspergillus mycotoxin groups, as there is potential for additional mycotoxins to develop during storage. Proper mycotoxin management techniques can reduce the risk of mycotoxins coming from feed materials as well as help to prevent the negative effects mycotoxins can on have animal health and performance. It is important to note that once there are mycotoxins in the crop, they will not go away. There will be higher levels of mycotoxins on farms practicing monocropping of corn, as opposed to those farms that are rotating crops or using deeper tillage methods. Source: Alltech
Nebraska Ag Update - November 22, 2017
Nebraska Ag Updates
USDA Provides Tips and Resources for a Bacteria-Free Thanksgiving
More than 45 million turkeys are eaten on Thanksgiving Day, with a never-ending list of side dishes and desserts. The Thanksgiving meal is by far the largest and most stressful meal many consumers prepare all year, leaving room for mistakes that can make guests sick. But never fear, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) is available with tips and resources to make this Thanksgiving safe and stress-free. “Turkey and other meat and poultry may contain Salmonella and Campylobacter that can lead to serious foodborne illness,” said acting FSIS Administrator Paul Kiecker. “By properly handling and cooking your turkey, you can avoid these harmful pathogens and ensure your family has a safe and healthy Thanksgiving feast.” Begin by following these five steps: Wash your hands, but not your turkey Washing your hands before cooking is the simplest way to stop the spread of bacteria, while washing your turkey is the easiest way to spread bacteria all over your kitchen. According to the 2016 Food and Drug Administration Food Safety Survey, 68 percent of consumers wash poultry in the kitchen sink, which is not recommended by the USDA. Research shows that washing meat or poultry can splash bacteria around your kitchen by up to 3 feet, contaminating countertops, towels and other food. Washing doesn’t remove bacteria from the bird. Only cooking the turkey to the correct internal temperature will ensure all bacteria are killed. The exception to this rule is brining. When rinsing brine off of a turkey, be sure to remove all other food or objects from the sink, layer the area with paper towels and use a slow stream of water to avoid splashing. To stuff or not to stuff For optimal food safety, do not stuff the turkey. Even if the turkey is cooked to the correct internal temperature, the stuffing inside may not have reached a temperature high enough to kill the bacteria. It is best to cook the stuffing in a separate dish. Take the temperature of the bird Although there are various ways to cook a turkey, the only way to avoid foodborne illness is to make sure it is cooked to the correct internal temperature as measured by a food thermometer. Take the bird’s temperature in three areas — the thickest part of the breast, the innermost part of the wing and the innermost part of the thigh — make sure all three locations reach 165ºF. If one of those locations does not register at 165ºF, then continue cooking until all three locations reach the correct internal temperature. Follow the two-hour rule Perishable foods should not be left on the table or countertops for longer than two hours. After two hours, food falls into meat poultry hotline expandsthe Danger Zone, temperatures between 40-140ºF, where bacteria can rapidly multiply. If that food is then eaten, your guests could get sick. Cut turkey into smaller slices and refrigerate along with other perishable items, such as potatoes, gravy and vegetables. Leftovers should stay safe in the refrigerator for four days. When in doubt call the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline If you have questions about your Thanksgiving dinner, call the USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline at 1-888-MPHotline (1-888-674-6854) to talk to a food safety expert. You can also chat live at AskKaren.gov, available from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. ET, Monday through Friday, in English and Spanish. If you need help on Thanksgiving Day, the Meat and Poultry Hotline is available from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. ET. Consumers with food safety questions can visit FoodSafety.gov to learn more about how to safely select, thaw and prepare a turkey. For more Thanksgiving food safety tips, follow FSIS on Twitter, @USDAFoodSafety, or on Facebook, at Facebook.com/FoodSafety.gov. Source: USDA
Certified Crop Adviser Program Celebrates Its 25th Year, An Update
Source: By Luther Smith, ICCA Executive Director, as his comments ran in CropLife magazine Here's a quick review of the International Certified Crop Adviser (ICCA) Program. Certi?fication is a voluntary process by which an organization grants recognition to an individual who has met certain predetermined qualifications or standards. This is not unique to CCA but across all professions. The value to the individual, employer, or client are around these five categories: Creditability, opportunities, motivation, ability, and validation. They are not the same for everyone but one that I think sums up the total falls under validation and was expressed to me by someone who is certified. Anyone can say they are a crop adviser, but the American Society of Agronomy (ASA) says a CCA is a Certified Crop Adviser. That's the validation of the person's abilities and knowledge by a respected professional and scientific organization. The value of being certified is also reinforced by the increasing requests by other organizations to work with CCAs and/or the program. These organizations span the scope of government agencies, conservation and environment groups, and private companies. Current Numbers There are 13,357 CCAs in North America. The program is active in the U.S., Canada, and Mexico, with the vast majority in the U.S., where the program began almost 25 years ago. It has had about a 1% continuous growth over the past five years. The specialties that were more recently added continue to grow. There are 357 4R Nutrient Management Specialists and beginning in 2018 this specialty will be available in the majority of states in the eastern U.S. and Ontario. The northwest U.S. and western Canada will be working on the specialty for a 2019 release. Sustainability Specialist has 98 and Resistance Management Specialist has 73 both began in August 2016 so they have not been available quite as long as the 4RNMS but did begin with a national scope whereas 4RNMS started in six states. The Certified Professional Agronomist is currently at 479 individuals. You can learn more about these specialties and the program in general at www.certifiedcropadviser.org. A new specialty is under development in precision ag. The goal is to bring the technology and agronomy knowledge together for a CCA who advises farmers on this topic. This specialty should be ready in August 2018 or February 2019. The development team is currently working on the performance objectives that will guide the exam question development. Coming in June 2018, ASA will host a conference on sustainable agronomy. Sustainability is growing in interest among all stakeholders in agriculture and food production. It combines the economic, environmental, and social aspects of the farm business to help ensure that the food system continues beyond the current generation. The conference will focus on practical and applied sustainable production practices that a CCA can recommend to their clients. CCAs have a significant role to play in expanding more sustainable production practices at the farm level. Thank you to all of the CCAs, employers, and volunteers who have made the program what it is today. Check out the Website to learn more.
Drought Outlook: Widespread Development Likely Across South, Southeast
During the past month, across the Northeast, the coverage of abnormal dryness (D0 on the U.S. Drought Monitor) has dropped and no areas of moderate drought (D1) remains. The development of any new drought over this region during the Dec-Jan-Feb (DJF) winter season is considered unlikely. Dryness and drought have decreased in coverage over the Midwestern states during the past month, with the exception of Missouri, where moderate to severe drought (D1 to D2) now covers most of the southeastern half of the state. According to CPC’s official 90-day precipitation outlook, prospects for improvement and/or removal of drought are best for northern and eastern portions of Missouri. Elsewhere across the Midwest, drought removal and/or improvement is expected. A comparison of the latest drought conditions with those from a month ago across the High Plains region reveals relatively small changes overall, especially in terms of spatial coverage. Despite CPC’s 30-day and 90-day precipitation outlooks favoring above-normal precipitation in eastern Montana and the Dakotas this winter, precipitation amounts, though likely above normal, may not be enough to overcome prior dryness, as normal amounts in that area are low, therefore drought persistence and/or intensification is likely. For western Montana, the CPC monthly and seasonal precipitation outlooks also favor above-normal precipitation this winter, but this area has already received substantial precipitation this past month and is closer to seeing drought removal and/or improvement than areas farther east. In addition, typical La Niña winters favor the proximity of the polar jet stream and the associated storm track, which also supports the idea of improving conditions over western Montana. Across approximately the southern third of the contiguous U.S., dryness and drought have expanded across the Southwest (especially Arizona), portions of the South (with widespread severe drought (D2) in Arkansas), and the Southeast during the past 30-days. View United States Seasonal Drought Outlook here. Most precipitation outlooks on timescales out through 90-days, combined with historical wintertime La Niña-related circulation patterns, favor drought persistence and/or intensification across a broad swath of the southern tier states in DJF. This is due in large part to the polar jet stream and mean storm track usually being displaced well to the north of this region during La Niña winters. In Hawaii, DJF represents the climatological core of the rainy season, and with CPC outlooks favoring above-normal precipitation this winter, it’s reasonable to expect drought improvement and/or removal across the Islands. There is currently no drought in either Alaska or Puerto Rico. Confidence for the Southeast is moderate to high. Thirty-day precipitation anomalies in the Southeast indicate mostly below- to near-normal precipitation, with the exception of far western sections of Virginia and the Carolinas, and over southern Florida, where above-normal precipitation fell. Typically during the DJF season, most of this region receives 20-30 percent of its annual precipitation. The exception is the Florida Peninsula, where the historical record reveals a gradation of values ranging from 15-20 percent in the north to 5-10 percent in the south. Existing moderate drought (D1) from the Carolina Piedmont region into southern Virginia (and over a localized area along the southern border of Alabama/Georgia) is expected to persist and/or intensify during the DJF period, as precipitation predictions at nearly all time-scales out to one season in advance support below normal precipitation. Drought development is also anticipated across portions of the Southeast region. This is a common (though not guaranteed) occurrence during La Niña winters. Across most of peninsular Florida, drought development is considered much less likely, as it received copious rainfall from both Hurricane Irma earlier in the season and from a record wet season this year. Confidence for the South is moderate to high. Across the South, most areas report precipitation deficits during the past 30-days, topping out with 3-5 inch deficits most notably in the Lower Mississippi Valley. In contrast, surpluses of 1-4 inches were reported in Tennessee and south-central Louisiana. For Oklahoma and all but eastern Texas, the 121-year climatological record indicates only 5-20 percent of the annual precipitation amounts can be expected during the DJF season, with the lowest amounts over the typically drier southern High Plains. For the remainder of the South (Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, and Tennessee), 20-30 percent of their annual precipitation can normally be anticipated during DJF. Dryness and drought (D0 to D2) has expanded in coverage during the past month across this region. According to WPC’s Week 1 precipitation forecast, precipitation amounts are expected to be light (less than 0.5-inch) over most of this region. Beyond that period, precipitation outlooks generally call for below-normal precipitation over this area. As with the Southeast, drought is likely to persist and/or intensify, as well as develop in other portions of the South, during DJF. Confidence for the Midwest is low to moderate. Thirty-day DNPs across the Midwest depict near- to below-normal precipitation over approximately the western half of the Midwest region, and near- to above-normal precipitation over the eastern half. Precipitation deficits generally ranged from 1-3 inches, while surpluses ranged from 1-5 inches or more. The largest surpluses were noted over areas downwind of Lakes Superior and Huron, where the lake-effect snow season has started. The DJF season is typically a drier time of year across the Midwestern states, with climatology indicating only 5-20 percent of the area’s annual precipitation can be expected. Dryness and drought (D0 to D2) has been focused primarily in eastern and southern Missouri, and in south-central Iowa. For Week-1, WPC predicts 0.5-2 inches of precipitation for approximately the eastern half of the region, and less than 0.5-inch elsewhere. Week-2 and experimental Week 3-4 precipitation outlooks favor near to below-normal precipitation. CPC’s official 30-day and 90-day precipitation outlooks indicate a return to above-normal precipitation amounts over much of the Midwest region, especially northern and eastern sections. It is over these northern and eastern sections that prospects for drought improvement and/or removal are greatest. Areas to the southwest are considered more likely to experience drought persistence and/or intensification. Confidence for the High Plains is moderate. Precipitation deficits ranged from near zero to 2 inches during the past 30-days over most of the High Plains region. On the other hand, precipitation surpluses of 0.5-2 inches (locally greater) were noted over central parts of Montana. Looked at another way, the 30-day Percent of Normal Precipitation (PNP) map depicts much of eastern Colorado, western Kansas, southern and eastern Nebraska, and portions of the Dakotas, as receiving only 5-25 percent of its normal precipitation during the 30-day period, and central Montana receiving 110-300 percent of normal (locally greater) during the period. As with the Midwest region, this is also a drier time of year for the High Plains region, with the climatological record indicating the reception of only 5-20 percent of the region’s annual precipitation during winter (DJF). CPC’s 30-day and 90-day precipitation outlooks favor above- normal precipitation amounts across nearly all of the large, ongoing drought area in the region. While western Montana may get some relief from the drought this winter (primarily from the expected proximity of the polar jetstream and associated storm track associated with La Niña), substantial relief appears less likely for eastern Montana and the Dakotas which have larger deficits to overcome. Source: Agfax
Yield Data Quality for Post-harvest Analyses
As the number of tools and services utilizing precision ag data to aide in decision making continues to increase, the importance of having quality data is also increasing. Most producers understand the importance of yield monitor calibration for generating accurate yield estimates, but there are other errors that can impact both the accuracy and the spatial integrity of yield data. Spatial integrity of yield data becomes very important when being used to generating prescriptions for fertilizer and seeding. Spatial inaccuracies in yield data become a problem when using yield maps to create management zones and subsequent input decisions by zone within a field. Taking the time to evaluate quality and removing erroneous data ensures prescriptions and other maps based off yield data are correct. Read the entire article here.
USDA-96% of Soybeans, 90% of Corn Harvested
The end is in sight for the 2017 U.S. corn and soybean crops. Weather was mixed throughout the season, from planting, to development, to harvest, but the USDA expects a new record high average yield for corn and an all-time high for soybean production following record planted acreage. As of Sunday, 96% of U.S. beans are harvested, compared to 93% last week, 98% last year, and the five year average of 97%, while 90% of corn is harvested, compared to 83% a week ago, 96% a year ago, and 95% on average. The soybean harvest is officially over in Illinois, Louisiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, Nebraska, North Dakota, and South Dakota, and activity is over for the year on corn in North Carolina and Tennessee. Winter wheat planting is complete, with 88% of the crop emerged, matching the usual pace, and 52% of the crop is rated good to excellent, down 2% on the week and 6% below a year ago. The USDA’s final 2017 corn and soybean production numbers and the first official winter wheat acreage estimate are all out in January. Source: AgriMarketing
National
Consider variable cash rent
Farm income is down to a fraction of what it was a few years ago, and cash rents are a big part of input costs.? University of Illinois farm management specialist Gary Schnitkey suggests working out a land rental agreement that could be good for the land owner and the renter.? In the face of lower farm income projections, Schnitkey suggests renegotiating cash rent arrangements into variable, or flexible cash rent.? The arrangement is based on some measure of farm productivity, such as yield, market price or a combination. Continue reading Consider variable cash rent at Brownfield Ag News.      
The economics of your Thanksgiving Dinner
This year?s Thanksgiving Dinner is the most affordable for consumers in the last five years.? In fact, the average cost for a classic Thanksgiving Dinner remains under $5 per person. American Farm Bureau?s John Newton says the cost of the turkey is the number one reason for the decline. AUDIO: Managing for Profit, Thanksgiving Dinner Continue reading The economics of your Thanksgiving Dinner at Brownfield Ag News.      
USDA awards veterinary grants
The USDA has announced thirteen grants to help support rural veterinary services in shortage areas.? The grant recipients include Lodi Veterinary Hospital and Mondovi Veterinary Service in Wisconsin, and Iowa State University in Ames, Iowa. Overall, 2-point-3 million dollars was awarded.? The 13 grants were funded through the National Institute of Food and Agriculture through the 2014 Farm Bill. Iowa State will use 250-thousand dollars to create a residency program in food animal parasitology.? Continue reading USDA awards veterinary grants at Brownfield Ag News.      
Addressing animal health in next Farm Bill
The turkey grower who presented the Thanksgiving turkeys pardoned by President Trump wants to ensure the federal government makes animal health a priority. Carl Wittenburg, a producer from western Minnesota and president of the National Turkey Federation, says the industry is better prepared should another widespread avian influenza outbreak occur. “I think we’re all up on our toes being prepared.? And the animal health (legislation) that we’re trying to push through the Farm Bill is going to be very important to making sure we continue to be prepared if we do have another bout of high-path AI.” Livestock groups are asking that animal health risks be addressed in the next Farm Bill, with Foot-and-Mouth Disease and avian flu top priorities. Continue reading Addressing animal health in next Farm Bill at Brownfield Ag News.      
Tyson building plans pause in Kansas, proceed in Tennessee
Tyson Foods is moving forward with a new chicken production plant in Tennessee, but delaying a possible new plant in Kansas. Tyson announced they will build a new 300-million dollar chicken production facility in Gibson County near Humboldt.? This is in addition to the expansion of their Union City facility announced in August.? The new project is expected to create 15-hundred new jobs when it opens in 2019. The Humboldt site will be Tyson?s fifth in Tennessee.? Continue reading Tyson building plans pause in Kansas, proceed in Tennessee at Brownfield Ag News.      
Dicamba drift causes wide range of yield impact
Soybean growers are reporting a wide range of yield impact from dicamba drift this year. Bob Worth is a farmer from southwest Minnesota and secretary of the Minnesota Soybean Growers Association. “It’s huge.? In some cases, the dicamba increased the yield, and in some cases it went all the way up to a 12-bushel decrease.” Worth also chairs the Dicamba Task Force commissioned by the Minnesota Soybean Growers. Continue reading Dicamba drift causes wide range of yield impact at Brownfield Ag News.      
Appropriations bill includes Great Lakes funding
Money for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative is part of a U.S. Senate appropriations bill.? Wisconsin Senator Tammy Baldwin says the 300-million dollars secured in the spending bill is an economic necessity for the region. If the spending plan passes, it will continue to fund the clean-up of polluted sites, restore water quality and combat invasive species throughout the Great Lakes region. President Trump proposed eliminating federal funding for the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative. Continue reading Appropriations bill includes Great Lakes funding at Brownfield Ag News.      
Ample commodity supplies are reason for consumers to be thankful
American Farm Bureau Federation economist John Newton says U.S. consumers benefit from the lower commodity market trend.? Newton tells Brownfield exceptions have been avian flu?s effect on eggs and tight pork belly stocks? effect on bacon.? But he says lower farm prices because of ample supplies of grain, dairy and livestock are a relief at the checkout counter. ?We can still have systemic shocks that will drive food prices up in one area or another,? Newton told Brownfield Ag News at the recent NAFB Trade Talk event in Kansas City, ?but overall, when you look in general it?s been relatively flat, and that benefits the consumer.? Specifically at Thanksgiving, Newton says supplies of turkey and other ingredients give U.S. Continue reading Ample commodity supplies are reason for consumers to be thankful at Brownfield Ag News.      
Cattle, hog futures up ahead of holiday
At the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, cattle futures ended the day sharply higher in light trade volume on technical support.? Wholesale beef?s firm move at the midday was supportive of the day?s trade.? Follow through buying is helping to bring some traders back into the market.? December live cattle closed $1.07 higher at $119.05 and February live cattle closed $1.42 higher at $125.47.? January feeder cattle closed $1.10 higher at $152.72 and March feeder cattle closed $1.32 higher at $151.15. Continue reading Cattle, hog futures up ahead of holiday at Brownfield Ag News.      
U.S. veal producers concerned about import quality
The President of the American Veal Association says he is concerned about veal imports from the European Union.? Dale Bakke tells Brownfield the EU?s definition of veal is different, which explains why American veal is a higher-quality product.? “American veal is raised for 20-22 weeks, about 475 to 500 pounds.? They’re raised on a diet primarily of milk.? They’re also getting generally 100-150 pounds of grain where European veal is raised for 26 up to 52 weeks of age, so it’s a significantly older animal and plus they’re fed on a diet primarily of grain.” Bakke also says EU veal producers are using animal health products that are illegal in the U.S.? Continue reading U.S. veal producers concerned about import quality at Brownfield Ag News.      
Weekly ethanol production notches new high
  Last week’s average daily ethanol production was a new all-time high at 1.074 million barrels a day. That is up 20,000 on the week and 13,000 more than the previous record, set in late January 2017. Profit margins are good, with relatively inexpensive and plentiful corn, and demand is solid, even with uncertainties about potential changes to the Renewable Fuels Standard. Stocks jumped 400,000 barrels to 21.897 million, in-line with the usual seasonal trend. Continue reading Weekly ethanol production notches new high at Brownfield Ag News.      
Soybean farmers partner with county road commission
  A partnership between soybean farmers and a county road commission is providing new technology to inspect rural bridges. Kathy Maurer with the Michigan Soybean Promotion Committee says most weight limits on bridges are made from visual inspections and when limits are imposed they can cause major reroutes that add up for farmers.? ?Every time a farmer has to recognize a load limit, it will add time and it will add dollars to the cost of them moving their inputs and their products.? She says a $10,000 grant from the checkoff, with the help of the Soybean Transportation Coalition, was able to provide a sensor kit and training to Midland County Road Commission to re-evaluate load limits on three rural bridges.? Continue reading Soybean farmers partner with county road commission at Brownfield Ag News.      
Concerns increase over market access to Japan
The 11 remaining members of the Trans-Pacific Partnership recently announced plans to move forward with a modified trade agreement without the US. US Meat Export Federation economist Erin Borror says if that agreement is implemented it would create market access problems for US beef and pork in Japan. Japan is currently the largest export market for US beef.? ?We pay higher tariffs in Japan than any other significant market,? she says.? Continue reading Concerns increase over market access to Japan at Brownfield Ag News.      
Soybeans, corn up ahead of Thanksgiving
  Soybeans were higher on commercial and technical buying. The trade?s watching the tail end of harvest, expecting most areas to wrap up by the weekend. The USDA?s final 2017 production totals for beans and corn are out in January. Forecasts for parts of Argentina and southern Brazil are drier, possibly because of the current weak La Nina pattern. Conditions in most of the rest of Brazil look good. Still, with the uncertainties, DTN FOB prices at Brazil?s ports hit a more than three month high. Continue reading Soybeans, corn up ahead of Thanksgiving at Brownfield Ag News.      
USTR ?concerned? about lack of headway in latest NAFTA negotiations
The fifth round of NAFTA negotiations in Mexico City is over, with U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer issuing a written statement which almost exactly matches what he said after the fourth round back in October. ?We have seen no indication that our partners are willing to make any changes that will result in a rebalancing and a reduction in these huge trade deficits,? Lighthizer said at that time. In his written statement, Lighthizer said he was concerned about the lack of progress and said he hoped there would be more before the end of the year. Continue reading USTR ?concerned? about lack of headway in latest NAFTA negotiations at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
Option Expiration for Grains
Option expiration has been a catalyst for higher prices over the last week.
Opportunity Maker
Producer John Pagel of Kewaunee is a 2017 Top Producer of the Year honoree who manages multiple dairies across two states. Here's his story on how he expanded his  Wisconsin dairy by involving family, community and industry.  
New technology might simplify diagnosis of plant and animal diseases.
New technology might simplify diagnosis of plant and animal diseases.
An employee incentive plan is one way farm owners can encourage key em
An employee incentive plan is one way farm owners can encourage key employees to stay.
The Farm CPA: Are R&D Tax Incentives Right For You?
One of the better tax credits relates to increasing research and development (R&D) in your farm operation. Congress has expanded the availability of the credit, and many farmers now qualify to take it. 
Texas Cowboy Injured in Wildfires Gives Thanks
Last March, wildfires tore through the Texas panhandle.
As all parties have quickly discovered, the VFD process is more than j
As all parties have quickly discovered, the VFD process is more than just having a vet?s signature on a scrap of paper.
Getting sauced on cranberries
Business Matters: ?Tis The Season To Buy Inputs
As we ponder the early discount season, let’s focus on seed and crop protection because both inputs offer these kinds of opportunities. As you consider products for your operation, think of the five Ps: performance, practical, placement, peace of mind and price.
While hard to calculate, quality of life should be included when consi
While hard to calculate, quality of life should be included when considering the benefits of robotics.
Rancher, Volunteer Fire Chief Thankful For Help After Kan. Wildfire
March 6, 2017 is a day Beaver County, Okla., rancher and volunteer fire chief Bernie Smith will always remember. That day wildfires tore through the central and southern Plains. Nearly 2 million acres across four states were scorched by fast moving fires that month. AgDay national reporter Betsy Jibben and national videographer Russ Hnatusko report over Smith’s recollection of the fire, his future and why he’s thankful this Thanksgiving.
Opportunity Maker
John Pagel of Kewaunee is a 2017 Top Producer of the Year honoree who manages multiple dairies across two states.
Livestock farmers can help build their business through Facebook in a
Livestock farmers can help build their business through Facebook in a few minutes each day, says Amber Henry of Henry Meat Co., during MU Extension?s Pearls of Production workshop.
Market Outlook
Although spotty, there are signs of stabilization underway in portions of the Corn Belt farmland market.
If you?re planning on seeking financing in the coming year there are
If you?re planning on seeking financing in the coming year there are four things you can do to make securing that loan easier and faster.