@C - CORN - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Jul '17 369'2 363'0 363'4 -5'2
Sep '17 377'2 370'6 371'4 -5'2
Dec '17 387'2 380'6 381'4 -5'2
Mar '18 396'6 390'4 391'4 -4'6
May '18 402'4 396'6 397'4 -4'4
Jul '18 407'6 402'4 403'2 -4'4
@S - SOYBEANS - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Jul '17 920'4 911'6 914'6 -4'0
Aug '17 924'4 916'0 918'6 -3'6
Sep '17 926'0 917'0 919'6 -4'0
Nov '17 930'2 920'2 922'6 -5'0
Jan '18 937'6 927'6 930'2 -5'0
Mar '18 943'6 934'2 936'6 -4'6
May '18 949'6 940'0 943'4 -4'0
@K - HARD RED WINTER WHEAT - KCBT
Month High Low Last Chg
Jul '17 467'4 459'0 463'0 -4'6
Sep '17 485'2 477'0 481'0 -4'4
Dec '17 511'4 502'0 506'2 -4'4
Mar '18 525'2 516'4 519'6 -5'6
@L - LIVE CATTLE - CME
Month High Low Last Chg
Jun '17 119.500 118.000 118.525 -0.975
Aug '17 114.825 113.400 113.875 -1.475
@C - COTTON #2 - ICEFU
Month High Low Last Chg
Jul '17 71.39 70.68 71.04 0.15
Oct '17 68.27 66.34 67.08 -1.19
Dec '17 68.17 66.72 67.09 -1.08
DTN Click here for info on Exchange delays.
Local
Bean Leaf Beetles and Bean Pod Mottle Virus
This year is certainly keeping us busy! It doesn’t seem to matter which way we turn or what crop we are scouting pests are being observed. Bean leaf beetles have been found in both soybean and alfalfa fields. With the amount of bean leaf beetles being observed out in the fields, producers need to also watch for Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) development. BPMV was first identified in South Dakota in 1998 and is considered an economically important soybean disease. What does BPMV look like? Bean pod mottle virus symptoms are commonly confused with herbicide injury and can resemble symptoms of other viruses. Symptoms associated with BPMV include mild to severe chlorotic mottling or mosaic and rugosity (distortion or wrinkling) on foliage, stunting, and delayed maturity (Figure 1). Symptom severity may lessen during hot weather or with maturity; however, the plant still remains infected with the virus. One effect of delayed maturity is the green stem disorder. This is where the stem remains green after the soybean pods have matured. Infection by BPMV decreases pod formation and reduces seed size, weight, and number. Seed coat mottling (the discoloration of the seed due to a black or brown pigmentation bleeding from the hilum) is another symptom caused by this virus. Grain with discolored seeds may be docked at the time of sale. BPMV is also associated with increases in seed infection by Phomopsis spp. How is BPMV spread? Bean pod mottle virus is primarily vectored by the bean leaf beetle, Cerotomoa trifurcate (Forster) in the United States. When bean leaf beetles feed on BPMV-infected soybean plants they also ingest the virus and become a carrier (viruliferous). The virus can be obtained with a single bite of an infected plant. Virus transmission occurs rapidly with the next feeding. As the beetle moves throughout the field, it spreads the virus to the healthy plants. Not only is the beetle an efficient vector, but it also feeds on the soybean foliage resulting in defoliation. Later in the season the bean leaf beetles will feed not only on the leaves but also on the soybean pods and are capable of causing yield loss by clipping the pods from the plant prior to harvest. Bean Leaf Beetle Identification Adult bean leaf beetles are approximately ¼ inch long and can vary greatly in color from white, yellow, brown, red and several other intermediate shades (Figure 2). Adult beetles have a black triangle directly behind their thorax and varying numbers of black spots (can have 0, 2, or 4) on their elytra (backs). Bean leaf beetles can be difficult to scout for due to their defensive behavior of falling off of plants when disturbed. If fields are exhibiting large amounts of defoliation a sweep net can be used to determine if the culprit is bean leaf beetles. Management Bean leaf beetles can be managed through insecticide applications which will inhibit the spread of BPMV. Bean leaf beetles should be managed when scouted plants have approximately 30% defoliation. Insecticide seed treatments are effective at managing the overwintering population of bean leaf beetles. Transmission of BPMV by the overwintering generation of bean leaf beetles causes severe yield loss. There is no chemical control available for BPMV infected plants found in the field. To date, no soybean cultivars have been found to be resistant to BPMV. Source: Connie Strunk, South Dakota State University Extension
National
Trump discusses agriculture in Iowa speech
President Donald Trump discussed agriculture during a stop in Cedar Rapids, Iowa Wednesday night. In a 20-minute speech?before a crowd of about 250 people at Kirkwood Community College, Trump touched on several ag-related topics. ?Family farms are the backbone of America and my administration will always support the farmer.? ?We will protect the corn-based ethanol and biofuels that power our country.? ?I will be including a provision in our infrastructure proposal to promote and enhance broadband access for rural America also.? ?We will rebuild rural America.? Bob Hemesath of Decorah, Iowa, chairman of the Iowa Corn Growers Association, said he was glad to hear Trump reaffirm his commitment to ethanol and the importance of ag trade. Continue reading Trump discusses agriculture in Iowa speech at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
Louisiana Cotton Hurt, Corn Benefits from Moisture
As Louisiana gets hit with heavy rain from Tropical Storm Cindy, the Pelican State has already experienced a wet spring, but it hasn’t hurt the corn crop.
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MORNING GRAIN MARKET UPDATE Fundamental inputs remain weak this ...
MORNING GRAIN MARKET UPDATE Fundamental inputs remain weak this morning and the technical chart traders are liquidating ownership and adding new short positions. Market bears continue to talk about beneficial rainfall across most of the corn belt while market bulls could be looking for a bargain buying opportunity ahead of the June 30th acreage report. On the open futures are lower on non-threatening weather. Corn down 3-1/2, beans down 3, KC wheat down 7. Crude oil is up 20 cents per barrel.>
I married my high school sweetheart, Katie, in the summer of 2011. We ...
I married my high school sweetheart, Katie, in the summer of 2011. We were blessed with our first child, Clarence, this past March. Katie and I both grew up in Wood River where we attended high school. To read more about Josh Gartner click on the link below! #KeepingItLocal>
MORNING GRAIN MARKET UPDATE Both bulls and bears continue to watch ...
MORNING GRAIN MARKET UPDATE Both bulls and bears continue to watch the weather maps each day. Tropical Storm Cindy will approach the coast of Louisiana and southeast Texas late today. Variable temps with chances of rainfall is keeping a lid on Chicago futures so far this week. Chicago, KC, and MPLS wheat futures are lower on the open due to Russian crop tours indicating good conditions and could exceed 70 million metric tons, or just over 2.5 billion bushels. Corn and soybean futures found technical support overnight. On the open, corn up 1-1/2, beans up a penny, KC Wheat down 6. Crude oil up 10 cents a barrel.>
Meet Damon Kasselder who works out of our Grand Island Grain ...
Meet Damon Kasselder who works out of our Grand Island Grain Terminal. His trade area includes Grand Island, Hastings, Doniphan, Giltner, Juniata and Roseland. #KeepingItLocal>
Beautiful day out here in northeast Nebraska for the RFR Plot Tour! ...
Beautiful day out here in northeast Nebraska for the RFR Plot Tour! #YourYieldsTour>
MORNING GRAIN MARKET UPDATE The overnight session started stronger ...
MORNING GRAIN MARKET UPDATE The overnight session started stronger on steady to lower crop conditions. The marketplace was looking for a 2 to 3 point increase in corn and soybean conditions, corn was unchanged from last week and soybeans were only a point better. Spring wheat was rated 4 points lower than last week. The marketplace is patiently waiting for next weeks acreage report from the USDA. The report will be released on Friday morning. On the open at 8:30 am, Corn is down 2-1/2. Soybeans 4 to 5 lower. KC Wheat 5 lower, with crude oil trading over a dollar lower.>
Is IDC starting to show up in your fields? If so, contact your local ...
Is IDC starting to show up in your fields? If so, contact your local Aurora Cooperative agronomist to help you with some solutions.>
MORNING GRAIN MARKET UPDATE Overnight, CME futures saw big volume on ...
MORNING GRAIN MARKET UPDATE Overnight, CME futures saw big volume on weather related trade. Corn futures opened sharply lower from Fridays close but managed to gain back some as soybeans and wheat futures traded higher. More talk this morning about a tropical storm getting fired up in the Gulf and moving north and east over the next few days. Both grain bulls and bears will be watching this closely. On the open, corn down 4, soybeans up 2, KC wheat up 3-4. Crude oil unchanged to slightly higher.>
We want to wish all the dad's today a Happy Father's Day! This ...
We want to wish all the dad's today a Happy Father's Day! This picture of a hard-working dad was submitted during our planting picture giveaway. Amazing illustration of life with a dad who farms. Photo credit: Paige Yockey>
Taken yesterday at our Doniphan Your Yields Tour! Photo credit to Sam ...
Taken yesterday at our Doniphan Your Yields Tour! Photo credit to Sam Carey>
Meet Lynn Culbertson! Her trade area includes Nuckolls and Thayer ...
Meet Lynn Culbertson! Her trade area includes Nuckolls and Thayer counties in Nebraska and Republic and Jewell counties in Kansas. #KeepingItLocal>
Just kicked off the Doniphan Your Yields Tour! #YourYieldsTour
Just kicked off the Doniphan Your Yields Tour! #YourYieldsTour>
?Emerge together, win together! growers learn more about emergence ...
?Emerge together, win together! growers learn more about emergence at the first station of the Your Yields Tour in York! #YourYieldsTour?>
We are here in York for another Your Yields Tour! The Aurora Aerial ...
We are here in York for another Your Yields Tour! The Aurora Aerial teams are ready to fly for another demo today! #YourYieldsTour>
>
Local
Bean Leaf Beetles and Bean Pod Mottle Virus
This year is certainly keeping us busy! It doesn’t seem to matter which way we turn or what crop we are scouting pests are being observed. Bean leaf beetles have been found in both soybean and alfalfa fields. With the amount of bean leaf beetles being observed out in the fields, producers need to also watch for Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV) development. BPMV was first identified in South Dakota in 1998 and is considered an economically important soybean disease. What does BPMV look like? Bean pod mottle virus symptoms are commonly confused with herbicide injury and can resemble symptoms of other viruses. Symptoms associated with BPMV include mild to severe chlorotic mottling or mosaic and rugosity (distortion or wrinkling) on foliage, stunting, and delayed maturity (Figure 1). Symptom severity may lessen during hot weather or with maturity; however, the plant still remains infected with the virus. One effect of delayed maturity is the green stem disorder. This is where the stem remains green after the soybean pods have matured. Infection by BPMV decreases pod formation and reduces seed size, weight, and number. Seed coat mottling (the discoloration of the seed due to a black or brown pigmentation bleeding from the hilum) is another symptom caused by this virus. Grain with discolored seeds may be docked at the time of sale. BPMV is also associated with increases in seed infection by Phomopsis spp. How is BPMV spread? Bean pod mottle virus is primarily vectored by the bean leaf beetle, Cerotomoa trifurcate (Forster) in the United States. When bean leaf beetles feed on BPMV-infected soybean plants they also ingest the virus and become a carrier (viruliferous). The virus can be obtained with a single bite of an infected plant. Virus transmission occurs rapidly with the next feeding. As the beetle moves throughout the field, it spreads the virus to the healthy plants. Not only is the beetle an efficient vector, but it also feeds on the soybean foliage resulting in defoliation. Later in the season the bean leaf beetles will feed not only on the leaves but also on the soybean pods and are capable of causing yield loss by clipping the pods from the plant prior to harvest. Bean Leaf Beetle Identification Adult bean leaf beetles are approximately ¼ inch long and can vary greatly in color from white, yellow, brown, red and several other intermediate shades (Figure 2). Adult beetles have a black triangle directly behind their thorax and varying numbers of black spots (can have 0, 2, or 4) on their elytra (backs). Bean leaf beetles can be difficult to scout for due to their defensive behavior of falling off of plants when disturbed. If fields are exhibiting large amounts of defoliation a sweep net can be used to determine if the culprit is bean leaf beetles. Management Bean leaf beetles can be managed through insecticide applications which will inhibit the spread of BPMV. Bean leaf beetles should be managed when scouted plants have approximately 30% defoliation. Insecticide seed treatments are effective at managing the overwintering population of bean leaf beetles. Transmission of BPMV by the overwintering generation of bean leaf beetles causes severe yield loss. There is no chemical control available for BPMV infected plants found in the field. To date, no soybean cultivars have been found to be resistant to BPMV. Source: Connie Strunk, South Dakota State University Extension
Trump Pledges His Support for Agriculture on Iowa Visit
President Donald Trump celebrated political victories and promised more to come as he returned to Iowa Wednesday for a whirlwind tour through the state's second-largest city. The president's first visit to the state since taking office featured an official event in which he praised Iowa agriculture and pledged to boost rural high speed internet followed by an exuberant primetime rally that mirrored his 2016 campaign events in showmanship and rhetoric. In a visit to Kirkwood Community College, Trump stood between John Deere and Case IH farm machinery to pledge his administration's commitment to boosting agriculture exports, loosening federal regulations and supporting ethanol and biofuels. Funding for expanded broadband internet access, he promised, would be included in a forthcoming $1 trillion infrastructure package. "Farming is something that is very beautiful to me. I'm not a farmer, but I'd be very happy to be one," Trump told the crowd. "It's a very beautiful world to me, and it's a truly noble American profession." Trump carried the rural theme into a wide-ranging campaign rally in front of nearly 6,000 die-hard supporters that evening. Buoyed by Tuesday night's Republican victories in two special congressional elections and the raucous, chanting crowd, the president spoke for more than an hour, touting his administration's early accomplishments and predicting the imminent death of the health care law known as Obamacare. The address wasn't without one political wrinkle, though. In a riff on his support for all manner of energy production, Trump singled out and disparaged wind - a major generator of power, growth industry and source of income across Iowa. "I don't want to just hope the wind blows to light up your homes and your factories," Trump told the crowd after ticking off a list of energy sources his administration supports, "as the birds fall to the ground." Wind energy accounts for 37 percent of power generated in Iowa, and has long been a bipartisan point of pride. Wednesday's trip was Trump's first visit to the state since his post-election, pre-inauguration "thank you" tour stop in Des Moines last December. This time, he was joined by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue and Terry Branstad, the erstwhile Iowa governor who soon departs for Beijing at Trump's ambassador to China. Branstad, who has been in Washington, D.C., for the last several weeks preparing for his new role, traveled to Iowa on Air Force One with Trump. The pair walked off the plane together, sharing an umbrella as they descended the stairs in a rainstorm. They were greeted on the tarmac by Branstad's successor, Gov. Kim Reynolds, and acting Lt. Gov. Adam Gregg. "We're happy and really proud of Terry," Trump said at Kirkwood. "His legacy will endure for a long, long time in this state. ... Mr. Ambassador, thank you very much and have a good time in China." At the rally, Trump also spoke to the fast-moving but as-yet unseen bill in the Senate to remake the Affordable Care Act health care law, accusing Democrats of refusing to take part in negotiations over the legislation. "If we went and got the single greatest health care plan in the history of the world, we would not get one Democrat vote because they're obstructionists," Trump said. Thus far in the Senate, not even Republican members have seen the bill being drafted, while Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., has said a vote could be held as early as next week. While the crowd he met in Cedar Rapids was loud, boisterous and adoring, Trump remains a divisive figure in the country, drawing strong support from his GOP base but also contempt from Democrats and progressives. His job approval is underwater nationally, with about 40 percent of Americans approving of his performance as president compared to almost 54 percent who disapprove, according to a polling average compiled by Real Clear Politics. In Cedar Rapids on Wednesday, those divergent opinions were fully evident. About 250 to 300 anti-Trump activists gathered in two groups on street corners about a block from the U.S. Cellular Center, where the rally was held. The protesters voiced boisterous opposition Trump, chanting, "We want a flood wall, not a border wall," and "Trump, you're fired," while waving handmade signs with messages such as "Impeach Him" and "Trump Makes America Hate Again." Early on in his speech, a woman in the crowd behind Trump stood up and began blowing a whistle. The crowd erupted in boos and then began chanting "USA! USA!" as she was escorted out. Trump, later, dismissed the protester as "a Bernie Sanders guy." The president's official event at Kirkwood was more apolitical, as Trump toured learning spaces for students in the community college's agriculture program and touted his administration's commitment to aid and support for rural America. New on Wednesday was the commitment from the president to include expanded rural high-speed internet in a vast infrastructure package he's been promising since the campaign but which has yet to take shape. "We must also ensure these students have the broadband internet access they need in order to succedd and thrive in this new and very modern and very changed economy and world," he said. "That is why I'll be including a provision in our infrastructure proposal - our $1 trillion proposal, you'll be seeing it very shortly - to promote and foster and enhance broadband access for rural America." Trump offered few details beyond that. In a briefing on Tuesday, Ray Starling, a special assistant to the president on ag issues, told reporters the administration would defer to Congress on how to implement a rural broadband program, but said he was hopeful new federal aid could "leverage" investments by private entities or state or local governments. The whirlwind tour at Kirkwood and the conspicuous appearances, by not just Trump but also Perdue and Ross, represented the administration's latest outreach to the Iowa agriculture community. Rural Iowa turned out big for Trump on Election Day in 2016, but has been cautious if his policy aims since he took office. His move to withdraw from the Trans-Pacific Partnership and plans to renegotiate the NAFTA trade deal with Canada and Mexico have drawn concern from farmers, who benefit from international commodity exports. On the flip side, the administration last month announced a deal allowing the U.S. to export beef to China for the first time since 2003, opening a large new market for producers. Perdue made Iowa one of his first stops following his confirmation as the head of USDA, appearing in Boone last month to reassure commodity farmers here that he understood their concerns on trade, ethanol policy and more. Trump reiterated all those points on Wednesday, while underscoring his wariness of trade deals and wish to renegotiate existing arrangements. Source: AgriMarketing
Tropical Storm Cindy to Push Rains As Far North As Indiana
Tropical Storm Cindy made landfall overnight near the Texas-Louisiana border, causing severe weather along the entire Gulf Coast this morning. Much of eastern Texas and western Louisiana are being hit with heavy rainfall, according to Accuweather. Minor coastal flooding is expected with a risk of fresh-water flooding in the Deep South as rain had been falling ahead of the storm. As much as 15 inches of rain is possible along the Gulf Coast, according to the National Weather Service. The storm will push showers and thunderstorms up into the Ohio River Valley, reaching as far north as southern Indiana, according to the National Weather Service. In central Kentucky, heavy downpours and gusty winds are expected, along with the off chance of an isolated tornado. “Severe weather is not the main threat with this rainfall event, but a few strong storms with gusty winds and an isolated tornado will be possible Friday afternoon and evening,” the NWS said. Source: Agriculture.com
Identifying and Correcting Manganese Deficiency in Soybeans
Manganese deficiency is the most common nutrient deficiency seen in soybeans in Michigan. Due to this year’s dry weather, deficiency symptoms are expected to be more prevalent and more severe than usual. The manganese deficiency symptoms depicted in photos 1 and 2 are likely to occur on muck or dark-colored sands with pH levels above 5.8 and lakebed or out-wash soils having pH levels above 6.5. Lately, I’ve seen more situations where manganese deficiency symptoms are occurring on coarse-textured soils having low organic matter levels. In these cases, the soil pH was above 6.5 and in one field, the pH was 7.0. The high pH was the result of applying too much lime. Michigan State University Extension advises that the best way to avoid this situation is to have your fields grid-sampled or sampled by management zones and apply lime using variable rate technology. Avoid raising soil pH levels above 6.5. Because increasing the available manganese levels in the soil is difficult, deficiency symptoms will reoccur in the same areas each year soybeans are grown. Broadcast manganese fertilizer applications are not recommended due to rapid fixation in the soil. Band applications of chelated manganese fertilizers are not recommended either, due to high fertilizer costs. However, manganese sulfate can be applied in a 2-by-2 band at planting when soil test levels are low. Foliar application of manganese sulfate at 1 to 2 pounds per acre of actual manganese is the most economical and effective method for correcting manganese deficiency. Apply 1 pound per acre of actual manganese when the first deficiency symptoms appear (six inch tall plants) and apply another pound per acre in 10 days if deficiency symptoms reappear. Manganese sulfate should not be tank-mixed with glyphosate as the performance of both products will be reduced. Ideally, the glyphosate should be applied first and the manganese sulfate applied at least three days later. In some cases, the manganese sulfate may need to be applied before the glyphosate. In this case, the two applications should be separated by at least seven days. If you must tank-mix a manganese fertilizer with glyphosate, always use an EDTA chelated manganese fertilizer. It is important to add the ingredients to the tank in the following order: Water Ammonium sulfate at 17 pounds per 100 gallons Glyphosate EDTA chelated manganese fertilizer A Soybean Management and Research Technology (SMaRT) trial conducted at two responsive locations (muck soils) in 2013 showed that manganese sulfate monohydrate fertilizer increased soybean yields by 1.9 bushels per acre over an EDTA chelate manganese fertilizer. Another SMaRT on-farm research trial was conducted at two potentially responsive sites (soil pH = 7.4) in 2013. The results confirmed that manganese foliar fertilizer application in the absence of visible deficiency symptoms will not increase soybean yields. In fact, research conducted by the Ohio State University in 2008 and 2009 found that foliar applications of manganese fertilizer in the absence of foliar deficiency symptoms actually reduced soybean yields. Source: Michigan State University Extension
MORNING GRAIN MARKET UPDATE Fundamental inputs remain weak this ...
MORNING GRAIN MARKET UPDATE Fundamental inputs remain weak this morning and the technical chart traders are liquidating ownership and adding new short positions. Market bears continue to talk about beneficial rainfall across most of the corn belt while market bulls could be looking for a bargain buying opportunity ahead of the June 30th acreage report. On the open futures are lower on non-threatening weather. Corn down 3-1/2, beans down 3, KC wheat down 7. Crude oil is up 20 cents per barrel.>
I married my high school sweetheart, Katie, in the summer of 2011. We ...
I married my high school sweetheart, Katie, in the summer of 2011. We were blessed with our first child, Clarence, this past March. Katie and I both grew up in Wood River where we attended high school. To read more about Josh Gartner click on the link below! #KeepingItLocal>
MORNING GRAIN MARKET UPDATE Both bulls and bears continue to watch ...
MORNING GRAIN MARKET UPDATE Both bulls and bears continue to watch the weather maps each day. Tropical Storm Cindy will approach the coast of Louisiana and southeast Texas late today. Variable temps with chances of rainfall is keeping a lid on Chicago futures so far this week. Chicago, KC, and MPLS wheat futures are lower on the open due to Russian crop tours indicating good conditions and could exceed 70 million metric tons, or just over 2.5 billion bushels. Corn and soybean futures found technical support overnight. On the open, corn up 1-1/2, beans up a penny, KC Wheat down 6. Crude oil up 10 cents a barrel.>
Joint Statement on Trilateral Agricultural Meetings
Canadian Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Lawrence MacAulay; Mexican Secretary of Agriculture, Livestock, Rural Development, Fisheries and Food Jose Calzada; and United States Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue issued the following statement at the conclusion of their first trilateral meetings in Savannah, GA, June 19-20, 2017. "Our three nations are connected not only geographically, but through our deeply integrated agricultural markets. Our trading relationship is vital to the economies - and the people - of our respective countries. We are working together to support and create good jobs in all three countries. We share a commitment to keeping our markets open and transparent so that trade can continue to grow. That mutual commitment was reaffirmed in our discussions this week. "The North American Free Trade Agreement has greatly helped our respective agricultural sectors as well as our consumers who have benefitted from an ever-growing variety of safe, affordable food products all year around. While even the best trading partnerships face challenges from time to time, our agricultural differences are relatively few in the context of the $85 billion in agricultural trade that flows between our three nations each year. "Over the years, the United States, Mexico, and Canada have also worked collaboratively to protect plant and animal health, conduct joint research, and share best practices. These efforts have helped to eradicate several pests and diseases from the region, differentiating us from the rest of the world. Our three countries remain committed to continued collaboration to ensure a safe and reliable regional supply chain that makes the North American agriculture sector more competitive. "Our visit to Georgia fostered the mutual understanding and personal relationships that will help North American agriculture thrive, improve our regional partnership and collaboration, and strengthen our trading relationship." Source: AgriMarketing
Potato Leafhoppers Reaching High Levels in Ohio Alfalfa and Forage
We have heard of and observed increasing potato leaf hopper (PLH) damage in many areas across OH last week. PLH feed similar to aphids, by piercing and sucking on plants causing stunting, thinning and yellowing of alfalfa, often called hopperburn. To scout fields, use a sweep net—a single sweep sample is a set of 10 sweeps, and choose 5-10 different field locations. Treatment is needed if the number of PLH (adults and nymphs) caught a sweep sample is equal to the height of alfalfa. For glandular haired or PLH-resistant alfalfa, the threshold is multiplied by 3. For older, thinning alfalfa stands, thresholds can also be increased, while newer stands (e.g. new seedings or 1st year) are more vulnerable. See Ohio State University Extension Bulletin 545, Control of Insect Pests of Field Crops (https://agcrops.osu.edu/publications/control-insect-pests-field-crops-bulletin-545), for those insecticides labeled for potato leafhopper, or for all insecticides labeled on alfalfa. Source: Ohio State University Extension
What Diseases Will Prevail this Summer?
Weird spring—wet and cool early, followed by hot and dry. What diseases will prevail? In early planted soybeans many were worried about Pythium root rot, thanks to the cool, wet weather. However, what root rot diseases can we expect in soybeans that were planted later? I recently evaluated a soybean research plot planted May 10 near Jacksonville, Illinois, and found a patch of Rhizoctonia root rot. Within this patch, the soybean stand appeared adequate, indicating that this root infection took place after emergence when this area was wet and warm. Rhizoctonia is a warm weather disease. (See chart below.) We are already seeing foliar symptoms due to recent dry weather. Depending on environmental conditions early in the season many other diseases that could infect soybeans could lurk in your fields, but have symptoms that don’t show up until later in the season. The chart below correlates weather conditions with probability of a disease appearing. In June 2016 I posted a blog predicting the likelihood of Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS) showing up later in the season. With recent dry conditions, the likelihood of the pathogen that causes SDS to infect the roots of recently planted soybeans decreases until we start to receive more moisture. If it continues to be relatively hot and dry, charcoal rot is another disease that may be more likely for this year. If environmental conditions are wet and later hot and dry, the microclerotia can infect roots and stems of soybeans throughout the season. Microsclerotia of Macrophomina phaseolina, the pathogen that causes charcoal rot, can be lurking on seed or in the soil, thanks to plant residues of soybeans, corn, sorghum, sunflowers or some weeds. Tiny dark specks (Microsclerotia) are associated with charcoal rot. Black zones are associated with Diaporthe disease complex. Infection by the pathogen that causes charcoal rot can interfere with water uptake and will be more severe in dry areas of the field. Plants can quickly die with leaves attached during later plant growth stages. This disease can be more severe on certain soybean varieties, stressed soybeans, in a tillage soybean systems and with higher populations. If infection is severe, rotation for one to two years to a non-host crop such as wheat is recommended. Depending on environmental conditions, seed treatments can provide three to four weeks of protection against many of these root rots. After this, protection is gone and the disease triangle will tell the tale. Pay attention to environmental conditions, soybean varieties and cultural practices to help predict what root rot or other disease threat could be an issue in your field. A dry June forces soybean roots deeper into the ground, but if conditions remain dry into July and August, another pest that could threaten this root growth is Soybean Cyst Nematode (SCN). Only time will tell what rot diseases may appear. Be on the lookout. Stephanie Porter is a sales agronomist with Burrus® Hybrids. She educates growers and Burrus staff on all types of pests, weeds, diseases and other agronomic issues that affect corn, soybean and alfalfa production. She is a 2017 Illinois Soybean Association CCA Soy Envoy. Source: Stephanie Porter, Illinois Soybean Association
Fairground improvements come to fruition as fair nears
The south end of the Hamilton County Fairgrounds has received quite the makeover in the last few years with the addition of a new livestock barn, permanent bathrooms for this year, electrical work and tree planting. ?The big project that came to completion last year was the livestock barn on the south end of the grounds and the livestock facility,? noted Keith Wasem. ?That one was finished and was used in last year?s fair. Phase two was the office and restroom facility.? Read more in this week's print or e-editions. Rate this article:  Select ratingGive Fairground improvements come to fruition as fair nears 1/5Give Fairground improvements come to fruition as fair nears 2/5Give Fairground improvements come to fruition as fair nears 3/5Give Fairground improvements come to fruition as fair nears 4/5Give Fairground improvements come to fruition as fair nears 5/5 No votes yet
Meet Damon Kasselder who works out of our Grand Island Grain ...
Meet Damon Kasselder who works out of our Grand Island Grain Terminal. His trade area includes Grand Island, Hastings, Doniphan, Giltner, Juniata and Roseland. #KeepingItLocal>
Beautiful day out here in northeast Nebraska for the RFR Plot Tour! ...
Beautiful day out here in northeast Nebraska for the RFR Plot Tour! #YourYieldsTour>
Wireworms Reducing Stands in Milo Fields
Sorghum and milo planting are well under way in South Dakota, and we are starting to receive reports of stand issues with some earlier planted fields. Upon inspection, these fields were found to have patches where it appeared the seed had been fed on, or the cotyledons had been removed. The culprit of these stand issues was determined to be wireworms (Figure 1). Wireworms (Click Beetles): Pest Profile Wireworms are the larvae of click beetles, which are commonly observed throughout the summer (Figure 2). There are many different species of wireworms and they can vary dramatically in both size and color. Wireworm populations are typically larger in fields that are following pasture, CRP, or as we are finding throughout South Dakota, wheat. Wireworms may be an issue for multiple years as some species can persist in the soil for up to three years. Unfortunately, there are no rescue treatments available once wireworms or the injury left by them is observed after planting. Management If wireworms are observed throughout the field, options for management include replanting using an in-furrow insecticide or leaving the crop as is. Wireworms typically reduce stands in small patches in a field, and do not remove large areas unless very high populations are present. Although insecticide seed treatments are labeled for wireworm management, there is evidence that they act as a deterrent or repellant and do not actually cause mortality of the wireworms. If a crop is going to be replanted into a field where wireworms previously reduced stand, we strongly recommend the use of an in-furrow insecticide that is labeled for wireworm management in the crop. Scouting Wireworm scouting should occur prior to planting, and consists of placing bait stations in the fields. The bait stations are constructed by digging a shallow hole, and placing pre-germinated corn or wheat seed within. The hole should then be covered using black plastic and marked so that it can easily be found later. Each week, prior to planting, the bait stations should be monitored to determine if any wireworms were attracted to the pre-germinated seeds. Source: Adam Varenhorst, South Dakota State University Extension
Get a Plan To Avoid Nitrogen Tie-Up
One of the many benefits promised by cover crops is their potential to scavenge nitrogen from the soil in the fall, winter and early spring and in doing so lessen nitrogen (N) leaching. However, covers crops, particularly those high in carbon, can also temporarily tie up nitrogen as their residue decomposes. Nitrogen is taken up by microorganisms decomposing the residue, which not only ties up existing soil N but can compromise any surface-applied nitrogen fertilizers aimed at subsequent crops. Many cover crop residues have carbon-to-nitrogen ratios (C:N) of 40-to-1 or greater, which makes them similar to residue stubbles left over from corn, wheat or other cereal grain crops. It’s fairly well known that those old-crop residues, with C:N rations of 60:1, can tie up a significant amount of N, and it’s often recommended to apply 40 to 50 pounds of actual nitrogen just to overcome this temporary tie-up. John Lory, a University of Missouri nutrient management specialist, recently wrote that cover crop residues can cause significant N tie-up to soil-applied fertilizers put on top of the residue. “This is especially true for UAN solution,” Lory said in an article that can be found here. “This is particularly a problem with liquid nitrogen applied on top of the residue.” The risk of tie-up depends on the residue and its C:N ratio. If the cover crop headed out and is tall and stemmy when terminated (high carbon content), any surface application of nitrogen on top of the residue will be temporarily immobilized. Lory said, “Farmers can plan ahead for this problem by injecting nitrogen into soil, either liquid or anhydrous ammonia. This avoids contact and tie-up by the residue.” If injection isn’t possible, he said surface applications of granule or prill forms will have less tie-up than liquid solutions. While I agree with that theory, I’ve learned the actual tie-up depends on many factors. I have been investigating the benefits of cover crops since 2004 and have learned a few things that have astonished me. In spring 2009 in a continuous corn field, I applied (using disc openers) 75 lbs. per acre of nitrogen as UAN in early April into a rye cover crop. The rye was just tillering. About 30 to 35 days later, I planted corn and then terminated the rye when it was beginning to joint and stood 2-plus feet tall. About 30 to 40 days later, I pulled soil samples to determine a sidedress nitrogen rate, eventually applying another 75 lbs. of N dribbled directly on the surface and next to the corn rows. While walking the field to pull samples, I recognized that the rye residue had decayed very rapidly, literally disappearing in four to five weeks. You would never see this response in wheat stubble after harvest. That swift decomposition was mineralizing nitrogen just ahead of V8 leaf stage of the corn crop, when nitrogen uptake really commences. Further investigation showed when I terminated the rye at early jointing, the C:N ratio is normally below 40:1. The N-rich fodder, with perhaps a C:N ratio as low as 30:1, plus the pre-plant N applied, caused the residue to quickly decompose and caused no immobilization. More importantly, I recognized that rye was virtually banking the nitrogen applied early in the spring and began to mineralize it just as the corn crop needed it. Thus, it served as an N stabilizer, protecting it from losses by keeping it in an organic form until later. My summation would be crop residues tie up nitrogen but cover crops may not — if you terminate them in a nitrogen-rich state and then let nature take its course. Source: Dan Davidson, AgFax
National
Trump discusses agriculture in Iowa speech
President Donald Trump discussed agriculture during a stop in Cedar Rapids, Iowa Wednesday night. In a 20-minute speech?before a crowd of about 250 people at Kirkwood Community College, Trump touched on several ag-related topics. ?Family farms are the backbone of America and my administration will always support the farmer.? ?We will protect the corn-based ethanol and biofuels that power our country.? ?I will be including a provision in our infrastructure proposal to promote and enhance broadband access for rural America also.? ?We will rebuild rural America.? Bob Hemesath of Decorah, Iowa, chairman of the Iowa Corn Growers Association, said he was glad to hear Trump reaffirm his commitment to ethanol and the importance of ag trade. Continue reading Trump discusses agriculture in Iowa speech at Brownfield Ag News.      
Research shows eggs boost growth in malnourished kids
Eggs in the diet can have growth benefits for children, according to new research.?Rachel Bassler is with the Egg Nutrition Center and says two new studies show adding eggs to the diet of malnourished infants and children can help them grow. Continue reading Research shows eggs boost growth in malnourished kids at Brownfield Ag News.      
Don?t jump the gun on replanting after storms
A farm management analyst cautions growers not to overreact if some of their crops were recently damaged during severe weather. Kent Thiesse is based in south-central Minnesota. Parts of the state have experienced heavy rains, strong winds, and hail this month. He tells Brownfield farmers can lose some of their plant populations and still achieve 90 to 100 percent of optimum yields. “You can even get up to 50 percent reduction on a corn stand with only a 20 percent yield reduction.? Continue reading Don’t jump the gun on replanting after storms at Brownfield Ag News.      
UAV bill introduced in House would give more control to local officials
A U.S. Congressman from Minnesota has introduced legislation intended to give more control to state and local officials who regulate unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV?s). Jason Lewis says the Drone Innovation Act addresses the operation of drones flying below 200 feet. “So on the one hand we have a national airspace that we want to preserve for interstate commerce, and there’s a federal rule there.? But I want to maintain the local control over the traditional things like a common law nuisance or privacy and property rights.? Continue reading UAV bill introduced in House would give more control to local officials at Brownfield Ag News.      
Rains a challenge for SE Minnesota farmer
A southeast Minnesota farmer says persistent rains made this spring challenging. Ben Daley of Lewiston tells Brownfield corn planting was slowed by saturated soils. “We planted quite a few of our corn acres before a wet spell, then obviously planted a lot after.? And there was a lot of yellow corn out there.? I saw a lot of the yellow corn, (and) not just in our (fields).” He says a three week stretch of dry weather helped turn the corn crop around. Continue reading Rains a challenge for SE Minnesota farmer at Brownfield Ag News.      
New Minnesota Corn policy director has background in renewables
The new public policy director for the Minnesota Corn Growers has a background in renewable energy. Amanda Bilek comes to MCGA after nine years as government affairs director for Minneapolis-based Great Plains Institute. “(I) helped lead state initiatives to implement public policy for energy-related issues.? And I’ve always kind of worked at the intersection of agriculture and energy, working on ways to use biomass for advanced biofuels, or biofuels generally.” Bilek says she?s excited to work on behalf of corn farmers, and build?relationships with policy leaders at the state and federal level. Continue reading New Minnesota Corn policy director has background in renewables at Brownfield Ag News.      
Momentum building for Biodiesel Tax Credit
A Minnesota Soybean Growers Association director says momentum is building in Congress to reinstate the Biodiesel Tax Credit. Chris Hill farms near Brewster, Minnesota, and is in Washington, D.C. this week for a National Biodiesel Board (NBB) meeting. He tells Brownfield there?s mounting support for a bill that not only renews the legislation, but changes the structure of the tax credit. “What we’re asking for is to put the $1 dollar per-gallon credit back on, and change it from a blender’s credit to a producer’s credit.” Previous tax credits have only been available to blenders of biodiesel, which NBB vice president of federal affairs Anne Steckel says allows foreign manufacturers to take advantage of U.S. Continue reading Momentum building for Biodiesel Tax Credit at Brownfield Ag News.      
Milk futures lower, cash dairy mixed
Class III milk futures at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange were pressured by follow through selling and demand uncertainties. July was down $.06 at $15.91, August was $.04 lower at $16.69, September was down $.08 at $16.91, and October was $.07 lower at $16.91. Cash cheese blocks were $.0375 lower at $1.56. Three loads were sold, two at $1.56 and one at $1.5975. The last uncovered offer was for one load at $1.56. Continue reading Milk futures lower, cash dairy mixed at Brownfield Ag News.      
Cattle trade at sharply lower prices
A light to moderate cattle trade developed on Wednesday afternoon in several areas. Most of the live sales in the North are marked at 122.00, $9.00 lower than last week?s weighted average basis Nebraska. Activity in the South ranged from 122.00 to 123.00, $8.00 to 9.00 lower than last week. Feedlot resolve seemed to weaken after futures were unable to hold an early rally. The slaughter was estimated at 118,000 head, 2,000 more than last week and 6,000 more than last year. Continue reading Cattle trade at sharply lower prices at Brownfield Ag News.      
Wheat gives back some of recent gains
Soybeans were lower on commercial and technical selling. The trade followed through on Tuesday, while watching the weather, which looks generally non-threatening in most of the Midwest. New acreage and quarterly stocks numbers are out on the 30th. Demand is strong, but exports have faced increasing competition from South America?s record crop, and there?s a lot of uncertainty connected to acreage. Soybean meal and oil followed beans lower. Safras e Mercado says 58% of Brazil?s soybeans have been sold, slower than average, and probably why the U.S. Continue reading Wheat gives back some of recent gains at Brownfield Ag News.      
Cattle industry analyst sees positive shift in beef demand
A cattle industry analyst says this spring?s unexpected cattle market turnaround bodes well for the future of the industry. Dr. Nevil Speer, CEO of Agri-Clear, says the fact that this spring?s cattle market rally was driven by increased consumer demand for beef is a very positive sign. ?What?s exciting about that is, it didn?t just happen. It?s not a fluke,? Speer says. ?It really was driven by consumers?consumers continue to come back to beef. Continue reading Cattle industry analyst sees positive shift in beef demand at Brownfield Ag News.      
Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: June 21, 2017
Jul. corn closed at $3.68 and 3/4,?down?1 and 1/4?cents Jul. soybeans closed at $9.18 and 3/4,?down?9?cents Jul. soybean meal closed at $297.90,?down?$3.00 Jul. soybean oil closed at 31.85,?down?17 cents Jul. wheat closed at $4.64 and 1/2,?down 8?cents Jun. live cattle closed at $119.50,?down 85 cents Jul.?lean hogs closed at $86.07,?up $1.07 Jul.? Continue reading Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: June 21, 2017 at Brownfield Ag News.      
Farmers Union seeks CRP acreage release in 4 states
Farmers Union leaders in four states and the head of the National Farmers Union are asking the U.S. Ag Secretary for emergency haying and grazing help for farmers . In a letter to Secretary Perdue, these Farmers Union groups are asking for the release of Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) lands in all of North Dakota, and parts of South Dakota, Montana and Minnesota. The letter says members have reported a feed supply that is deteriorating because of severe drought and hay that is becoming more and more scarce. Continue reading Farmers Union seeks CRP acreage release in 4 states at Brownfield Ag News.      
Honeybee Health Coalition demonstration project underway
The Honeybee Health Coalition is heading up a three year demonstration project to implement collaborative best management practices that help reduce honeybee colony loses. Coalition Facilitator Julie Shapiro says while honeybee losses have historically ranged from 10-15 percent, in recent years that number has more than doubled during over wintering.? ?There?s scientific consensus that there?s several stress factors impacting honeybees and the loss of colonies each year as well as impacting other pollinators.? Continue reading Honeybee Health Coalition demonstration project underway at Brownfield Ag News.      
Michigan Breakfast on the Farm this weekend
A dairy farmer says there needs to be more opportunities for consumers to learn about where food comes from and how it is produced. Dan Van Dyke tells Brownfield Michigan?s Breakfast on the Farm events provide transparency to local communities and consumers about what happens on a modern farm.? ?We?d just like people to understand and see how we take care of the animals.? It?s in our best interest to do what we can for them.? He says this Saturday their family farm J&J Dairy in West Michigan will host more than 2,000 visitors, and in addition to a free breakfast and farm tour, experts will be on hand to answer agricultural questions and discuss hot topics like GMOs. Continue reading Michigan Breakfast on the Farm this weekend at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
Louisiana Cotton Hurt, Corn Benefits from Moisture
As Louisiana gets hit with heavy rain from Tropical Storm Cindy, the Pelican State has already experienced a wet spring, but it hasn’t hurt the corn crop.
Threat of Dicamba Ban Looms in Arkansas
The Arkansas State Plant Board has rejected a proposed ban on the use of dicamba herbicide, but a procedural error in voting has prompted a re-vote, scheduled for Fri., June 23, according to the Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette. A deluge of complaints about drift triggered the move to vote on an emergency ban on dicamba — under heavy use this year with the launch of the Monsanto Roundup Ready Xtend crop system being used in tandem with BASF’s Engenia herbicide. As of June 21, the Arkansas State Plant Board had received 207 complaints about dicamba across 19 counties. According to the article, the umbrella agency of the Plant Board — the Department of Agriculture — said the board will have to vote again because of an error in determining how many votes were needed to pass the ban.    
John Deere 4440 and 4455 Tractors Sell Strong on Iowa Auction Yesterday
Strong auction sale prices yesterday (June 21, 2017) on John Deere 4440 and 4455 tractors on an auction in Nevada, IA
Clariant Steps Up R&D Investment
Clariant, a world leader in specialty chemicals, announces its investment in a state-of-the-art R&D greenhouse to step up its support for tackling current and future agricultural challenges. Inaugurated on June 21, the new greenhouse at Clariant Innovation Center (CIC) takes Clariant?s Crop Solutions product development support to a new and unique level. It will provide a real-life testing source for novel crop protection and management, as well as yield-enhancement solutions developed by Clariant and also in cooperation with customers. The 400sqm greenhouse offers smart simulation of environmental conditions such as humidity, light, rainfall and temperature, creating a proper climate for testing to supplement Clariant?s existing laboratory testing facilities at the CIC. The aim is to reduce development time and speed-to-market for advances in the niche growth areas of Plant Growth Regulators, Foliar Fertilizers and Bio-herbicides. These have been identified as focus areas to Clariant for successfully addressing current customer-specific needs and future global food demands. ?The new Crop Solutions greenhouse creates the perfect environment for fostering joint development in the areas we see as having most potential for delivering sustainable crop protection and, in the bigger picture, addressing the world?s increasing nutrition requirements,? said Britta F?nfst?ck, Member of Clariant?s Executive Committee. ?It?s a level of support that sets us apart within our industry and we are excited at the prospect of contributing even more closely to the innovations of tomorrow.? Christian Vang, Global Head of Business Unit Industrial & Consumer Specialties (BU ICS), commented: ?The new Greenhouse at the Clariant Innovation Center is another step reinforcing Clariant?s focus on sustainable innovation for the markets we serve. The BU ICS has driven a number of pioneering innovations in consumer care as well as industrial applications from this location since it opened in 2013. For our Crop Solutions business, this valuable extension to R&D support puts Clariant in an even stronger position to provide answers to current needs and future trends.? Peter Baur, Head of Clariant?s Crop Solutions Competence Center, added: ?The Crop Solutions team is delighted to now have the unique, in-house opportunity to create new concepts for screening to complement our already extensive laboratory application tests. We are looking forward to developing novel product innovations for crop solutions and yield enhancement including open innovation collaborations with our customers. This will assist us in making a significant impact for the next essential green revolution.? Clariant Crop Solutions is a global player in formulation additives and adjuvants for the crop protection industry. With a focus on developing more environmentally-friendly solutions, it works actively to support customers in optimizing the bio-availability of foliar fertilizers, increasing the effectiveness of agrochemicals, boosting plant growth regulators for better crop growth and improving bio-herbicides. Source: Clariant
Farming in the Fourth Dimension
Currently, farmers can use precision ag to construct 2-D images or even 3-D reconstructions of their fields. But a collaborative research project from three Georgia institutions wants to take monitoring abilities into the fourth dimension.
Tropical Storm Set to Bring Rain to Midwest
Grain markets are lower as weather forecast has rain for the Midwest with no extreme heat. Outside markets are quiet with crude trying to bounce after sharp slide.
Producers in the Dakotas Continue Liquidation Due to Drought
Already short on hay and forage after a hard winter, ranchers in North and South Dakota are continuing to reduce herds in response to severe drought conditions.
Milk Futures Dropping Quickly
More cows, more milk causing price drop.
PotashCorp-Agrium to become Nutrien upon Merger Completion
Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Inc. and Agrium Inc. have announced today that once the anticipated merger transaction closes, the new company will be named Nutrien. The new organization will be the global leader in reliable, low-cost crop nutrient production, combined with the largest agricultural retail-distribution network in the world. The regulatory review and approval process for the merger transaction continues and the parties expect closure of the transaction to take place in the third quarter of 2017. Merger of Agrium and Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan Additional information on the merger between Agrium and PotashCorp can be found?here.?Information about Agrium and PotashCorp can be found under their respective corporate profiles on SEDAR at www.sedar.com or on EDGAR at www.sec.gov,? or their respective websites at www.agrium.com and www.potashcorp.com.
We Don't Have The Plants In The Field to Achieve Previous Yields
The latest crop progress report from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), 67 percent of the corn crop was rated good to excellent. Indiana is lagging behind with only 45 percent of its crop in that category. 
The Next 5%: A Strategic Dairy Imperative
Growing export volumes to reach 20% annual milk production
Nufarm?s Abamex Insecticide Receives Additional Registrations
With an updated label for the insecticide Abamex from Nufarm, more specialty crops ? including mandarin oranges?? can benefit from the product’s control of pysllids, mites, leafminers, and other pests. Abamex is a new low-volatility, water-based formulation of abamectin that is safer for applicators to handle. “Nufarm is dedicated to offering more options to farmers of high-value specialty crops,” explains Brian Rund, customer and brand marketing manager for Nufarm Americas. “Sparked by the popularity of mandarin oranges, the specialty citrus industry continues to grow. But it’s also at risk to citrus greening or Huanglongbing (HLB). As the industry continues to rely mainly on insecticides to control the Asian citrus psyllid, having another useful rotation partner such as Abamex is important for resistance management.” Abamex is one of several brands Nufarm has to enhance and protect citrus fruit from HLB. A section 18 emergency exemption was approved for the use of Mycoshield on Florida citrus for the product’s activity against the bacteria that cause HLB. Already a powerful tool for cotton, potatoes, cucurbit vegetables, leafy vegetables and almonds, the label update extends Abamex’s use to the following specialty crops: Bean, dry and succulent Citrus fruit crop group 10-10 Fruiting vegetables (except cucurbits) crop group 8-10 Grapes and small fruit vine climbing subgroup (except fuzzy kiwifruit) crop subgroup 13-07F Guava Lychee Onion, green crop group 3-07B Papaya Pineapple Pome fruit crop group 11-10 Stone fruit crop group 12-12 Strawberries, low growing berry subgroup 13-07G Tree nuts crop group 14-12 Abamex starts working quickly to affect pests within hours of exposure. Its translaminar activity means it protects the entire leaf, inside and out.
Jebagro Acquires Significant Stake in Panamanian Company Grupo Agrosol
Jebagro GmbH, Hamburg, Germany has acquired a significant stake in the Panamanian company, Grupo Agrosol. Grupo Agrosol is based in Panama City. The company?s primary focus is to market crop protection and fertilizer products for the Central American markets, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Chile. Jebagro?s focus in this region is to develop and register agrochemical products. Jebagro has a strong pipeline of products under development. At the beginning of 2017, Jebagro purchased a significant number of registrations for this region. The synergies between Jebagro and Grupo Agrosol will combine the market access of Grupo Agrosol and the portfolio of Jebagro. According to Dr. Felix Thuerwaechter of Jebagro and Jens Schenck of Grupo Agrosol, this investment is a great opportunity to offer a wide range of products into Central America and the Andean countries. With immediate effect Grupo Agrosol will be operating under the new company name Jebagro Panama S.A.
"Food Evolution" Movie Looking to Change GMO Conversation
A new documentary highly biased toward science is already making ripples across the agriculture community, and it’s bringing along some high-profile names.
U.S. Won't Force Quick NAFTA Deal
President Donald Trump’s top trade negotiator said there’s no deadline to reach a deal on revamping the North American Free Trade Agreement, and if talks end in a deadlock the U.S. will be compelled to rethink its strategy.