@C - CORN - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
May '17 367'2 364'0 364'0 -1'0
Jul '17 374'2 371'0 371'2 -0'4
Sep '17 381'2 378'0 378'2 -0'4
Dec '17 391'4 388'2 388'4 -0'4
Mar '18 401'0 398'0 398'0 -0'4
May '18 407'0 404'4 404'4 -0'4
@S - SOYBEANS - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
May '17 958'0 950'0 952'2 -2'2
Jul '17 968'4 960'2 962'6 -2'2
Aug '17 970'4 962'2 964'6 -2'2
Sep '17 966'4 959'2 961'4 -2'4
Nov '17 964'4 956'2 958'4 -3'2
Jan '18 970'4 963'2 964'6 -3'4
Mar '18 974'0 968'4 969'4 -2'0
@K - HARD RED WINTER WHEAT - KCBT
Month High Low Last Chg
May '17 414'6 411'6 413'4 1'4
Jul '17 427'4 424'6 426'0 1'2
Sep '17 443'4 441'4 442'2 1'4
Dec '17 468'0 466'2 466'6 0'6
@L - LIVE CATTLE - CME
Month High Low Last Chg
Apr '17 130.025 129.025 129.825 0.825
Jun '17 115.975 114.650 115.825 0.975
@C - COTTON #2 - ICEFU
Month High Low Last Chg
May '17
Jul '17 79.49 78.89 79.35 -0.01
Oct '17
DTN Click here for info on Exchange delays.
Local
Forecast, soil moisture adequate for area farmers
Spring is officially here and planters in the fields around the county are a good indicator. According to the United Stated Department of Agriculture?s crop progess report, 3 percent of Nebraska?s corn crop was in the ground the week ending April 16, down from 6 percent last year at the same time. Farmers may be a few days behind where they were last year, but area producers say soil conditions are just about right for planting. Read more in this week's print or e-editions. ? Rate this article:  Select ratingGive Forecast, soil moisture adequate for area farmers 1/5Give Forecast, soil moisture adequate for area farmers 2/5Give Forecast, soil moisture adequate for area farmers 3/5Give Forecast, soil moisture adequate for area farmers 4/5Give Forecast, soil moisture adequate for area farmers 5/5 No votes yet
National
An interim grain storage expansion strategy
A grain handling expert says there could be long-term benefits from implementing a short-term strategy to increase storage capacity now. Gary Woodruff is a conditioning applications manager for GSI. He tells Brownfield as farmers work within an environment of low commodity prices and tightening margins, the ability to store and market grain has never been more important.       Continue reading An interim grain storage expansion strategy at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
Chasing Waterhemp, the Bell Cow of Weed Resistance
Waterhemp has piled on genetic muscle and built documented resistance to herbicides from six separate site of action groups in Illinois. Yet, even more alarming are the consequences of stacked resistance in waterhemp. Once resistance begins stacking, what’s the snowball effect of a weed juggernaut?  
Facebook
Thank you for sharing this with us!
Thank you for sharing this with us!>
Thanks for sharing this cute picture with us!
Thanks for sharing this cute picture with us!>
Thanks for sharing this great photo!
Thanks for sharing this great photo!>
Results from the Cooperative Speaking Contest at the State FFA ...
Results from the Cooperative Speaking Contest at the State FFA Convention held earlier this month...congrats to all the winners! Abigail Kleager of Aurora received a 4th place finish!>
Thanks for sharing this with us!
Thanks for sharing this with us!>
>
Thanks for sharing Adam!
Thanks for sharing Adam!>
Great story about one of our farmer-owners!
Great story about one of our farmer-owners!>
AURORA AG NETWORK Local Growing Degree Unit Information for Your ...
AURORA AG NETWORK Local Growing Degree Unit Information for Your Farm Every Monday we will be posting the soil temps for the previous 10 days as well as provide you a GDU forecast for the upcoming 10 days for the western, central and eastern regions. Update for the week of 4/24/17: Soil temps and conditions have been favorable for planting the past week. However, with little expected heat accumulation, the chance of rain, and low overnight temperatures, the forecast for the current week is highly unfavorable for continued planting. Germination of seed planted this week can be adversely impacted by the cold temperatures, cold-water shock, and could result in reduced seedling vigor. ? Ideal soil temps for corn are a consistent 50?F (or above), with adequate field moisture. ? Continued volatility ? Our AquaSpy moisture probes indicate temperatures are still fluctuating as much as 15?F to 18?F within 24 hours at the 4? depth. In some areas, dipping below the 50?F mark. This fluctuation can be much wider at the common planting depth of 2?. ? Be aware of your current field conditions. Fields with heavy residue can be 6? - 8?F cooler than bare ground. ? What will conditions be in the 48 hours after planting? Rapid seed water uptake (imbibition) occurs in this window and can adversely affect germination if weather or soil temperatures turn cold during this period. Emerge Together, Win Together. Uniform emergence is critical for maximum yield>
>
>
GIVEAWAY TIME! Send us your planting pictures and your name will be ...
GIVEAWAY TIME! Send us your planting pictures and your name will be entered into a drawing for a $100 Cabela's gift card! We will be giving away one gift card a week for 5 weeks so keep those pictures coming! Here is how to get your name into the drawing: 1. Take a planting picture (don't be afraid to include some smiling faces!) 2. Post that picture to our Facebook page (Aurora Cooperative) or tag us on Twitter @AuroraAgNetwork 3. Be sure to like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.>
Congratulations to our $500 Aurora Cooperative Annual Scholarship ...
Congratulations to our $500 Aurora Cooperative Annual Scholarship Winners for 2017! We are excited to see where the Ag industry takes you in the future! Elly Dahl -- Courtland, Kan. Blake Kirchhoff -- Hardy, Neb. Keatton Reese -- Pleasanton, Neb. Blake Bauer -- Fairbury, Neb. Michaela Cunningham -- Fullerton, Neb. Jacob Simonson -- St. Libory, Neb. Michelle Unruh -- Webber, Kan. Lily Woitaszewski -- Wood River, Neb. Donovan Buss -- York, Neb. Landon Wright -- Hastings, Neb.>
>
Congratulations to this April's winner Chad Carlson of Aurora! Chad ...
Congratulations to this April's winner Chad Carlson of Aurora! Chad was nominated for dedicating time to the youth of the Aurora Community by serving as a high school track coach along with doing his job here at Aurora Cooperative. Congrats Chad! Thank you for going above and beyond for your community!>
Local
Forecast, soil moisture adequate for area farmers
Spring is officially here and planters in the fields around the county are a good indicator. According to the United Stated Department of Agriculture?s crop progess report, 3 percent of Nebraska?s corn crop was in the ground the week ending April 16, down from 6 percent last year at the same time. Farmers may be a few days behind where they were last year, but area producers say soil conditions are just about right for planting. Read more in this week's print or e-editions. ? Rate this article:  Select ratingGive Forecast, soil moisture adequate for area farmers 1/5Give Forecast, soil moisture adequate for area farmers 2/5Give Forecast, soil moisture adequate for area farmers 3/5Give Forecast, soil moisture adequate for area farmers 4/5Give Forecast, soil moisture adequate for area farmers 5/5 No votes yet
Thank you for sharing this with us!
Thank you for sharing this with us!>
Thanks for sharing this cute picture with us!
Thanks for sharing this cute picture with us!>
Thanks for sharing this great photo!
Thanks for sharing this great photo!>
Results from the Cooperative Speaking Contest at the State FFA ...
Results from the Cooperative Speaking Contest at the State FFA Convention held earlier this month...congrats to all the winners! Abigail Kleager of Aurora received a 4th place finish!>
Getting Off to a Good Start ? Planting Depth Can Make a Difference
Planting depth recommendations for Ohio are 1.5 to 2 inches deep to ensure adequate moisture uptake and seed-soil contact. Deeper planting may be recommended as the season progresses and soils become warmer and drier, however planting shallower than 1.5 inches is generally not recommended at any planting date or in any soil type. When corn is planted 1.5 to 2 inches deep, the nodal roots will develop about 0.75 inches below the soil surface. However, at planting depths less than 1 inch, the nodal roots develop at or just below the soil surface. Excessively shallow planting can cause slow, uneven emergence due to soil moisture variation, and rootless corn (“floppy corn syndrome”) later in the season when hot, dry weather inhibits nodal root development. According to some field agronomists, shallow plantings increase stress and result in less developed roots, smaller stalk diameters, smaller ears and reduced yields. In a recent OSU evaluation of planting depths, grain yields were about 14% greater for the 1.5-inch and 3-inch planting depths than the 0.5-inch planting depth in 2011, and 40% greater in 2012. The lower yields of the shallow planting were associated with a reduced final stands and 6 to 7 times as many “runt” plants as the other two planting depths. In a 2013-2014 Cornell University study comparing planting depth across a range of soil types and plant populations, Cox and Cherney concluded that optimum seeding depth differed across sites and at times across years within sites. Additionally, the risks of reduced population or grain yield were generally greater at the shallow seeding depth compared with the deeper depth (2.5 inches). Research at Kansas State University that evaluated six planting depths ranging from 1 to 3.5 in. supported planting depth recommendations of 1.5 to 2.5 inches depending on soil conditions. Despite potential risks, many growers continue to plant at depths less than 1.5 inches. There is a perception that seed planted shallower than 1.5 in. will emerge more rapidly due to warmer soil temperatures closer to the surface. This is an important consideration as corn growers across the Corn Belt are planting earlier so they can complete planting before yield potential begins to decrease after the first week of May. Particularly in soils that crust, speed of emergence is critical in order to establish plant stands before heavy rainfalls “seal” the soil surface. Recent work by Deere & Company and the University of Illinois suggests variable seeding depth planting within fields may improve corn yield especially when soil moisture conditions become less ideal (drier or wetter). Research is underway to improve our understanding of corn response to planting depth across different soil types and conditions. Results of this work may enable more effective use of planting technologies that allow variable planting depths during the planting operation. Source: Peter Thomison, Ohio State University 
North Carolina?s Lack of Refuge Acres Putting Bt Corn at Risk
A new study from North Carolina State University finds a significant shortfall in the amount of “refuge” cropland being planted in North Carolina – likely increasing the rate at which crop pests will evolve the ability to safely devour genetically engineered Bt crops. However, the study also identified actions that may make farmers more likely to plant refuge crops in the future. For about 20 years, growers have made use of Bt crops to limit crop damage from pests. Bt crops, including corn, are genetically engineered to produce proteins from the Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) bacterium. These proteins are harmless to vertebrates, but toxic to a specific class of invertebrate crop pests. To date, these Bt crops have been remarkably successful. However, insect pests have shown the ability to evolve resistance to Bt proteins. In order to slow down the development of Bt resistance, farmers who plant Bt crops are urged to plant a certain percentage of their fields with non-Bt crops – called refuge crops. In fact, in the case of Bt corn, farmers are required to plant a section of their fields with refuge crops. Cotton insect problems intensifying in the Southeast That’s because refuge crops provide fodder for insect pests that are not resistant to Bt proteins. These pests are then able to breed with their Bt-resistant counterparts, diluting Bt resistance in the overall pest population. But compliance with planting refuge crops is variable. Some growers plant too little of their fields with Bt crops, and some don’t plant refuge crops at all. This raised some interesting questions for Dominic Reisig, an associate professor of entomology at NC State and an extension specialist at the Vernon James Research & Extension Center in eastern North Carolina. Reisig divides his time between conducting research and helping farmers deal with problems related to insect crop pests. Recently, Reisig began to wonder: How many growers aren’t planting sufficient refuge crops? Do growers understand the rationale behind refuge crops? What can influence whether growers plant refuge crops? And what factors affect a grower’s willingness to plant refuge crops? To address these questions, Reisig talked with several hundred corn growers in more than a dozen counties in eastern North Carolina. Controlled drainage can boost North Carolina Blacklands' corn yields Reisig found that approximately 40 percent of corn growers who used Bt corn would not plant refuge crops in the next growing season, while another 25 percent weren’t sure. However, a majority of growers did understand the value of refuge crops – and felt they should be planting them. Reisig also found that there was a high correlation between how much land was devoted to corn, cotton and soybeans in a county, and how likely farmers in that county were to plant refuge crops. The more land being devoted to crops, the more likely farmers were to plant refuge. “Some of the resistance to planting refuge may be due to a lack of understanding about how important refuge crops are,” Reisig says. “But it’s also likely to be a function of the fact that many of the farms in counties with low refuge crop compliance are smaller operations. Growers may simply be trying to get more crop yield from their acreage – though there is little evidence of short-term benefit, and ample evidence of long-term risk from Bt-resistant pests.” Reisig also found that better enforcement and peer pressure from other farmers weren’t seen as making farmers more likely to plant refuge crops. Instead, growers said that financial incentives – such as rebates on non-Bt seed – would make them more likely to plant refuge crops, as would the availability of high-yield non-Bt seed. “This study is really a starting point,” Reisig says. “We know this is a problem. I’m looking for partners in the social sciences to help me figure out how we can help growers make informed decisions and protect the long-term viability of their crops.” The paper, “Factors Associated With Willingness to Plant Non-Bt Maize Refuge and Suggestions for Increasing Refuge Compliance,” is published in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management. The work was supported, in part, by the Southern IPM Center, which is housed at NC State and funded by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Source: Southeast Farm Press 
How Will Cold Snap Affect Planted Crops?
With this week’s forecasted low temperatures projected to dip into the high 30s (°F) with potential rain events, growers have asked if/how germination will be affected for corn and soybean planted this week. Summary Imbibitional (fast) water uptake occurs within the first 48 hours after a seed is planted. Once planted, corn seeds need a two-day (48-hour) window and soybeans need at least a 24-hour window when the soil temperature at planting depth does not drop much below 50°F. When the soil temperature drops much lower than 50°F within that time frame, there is potential for chilling injury to affect seed germination and seedling growth. Soil temperature decreases after this time are less likely to affect seed germination. Key Considerations Check the weather forecast and soil temperatures for your area. It’s also important to check the soil temperature of each field the morning you intend to plant. (This can be done with a meat thermometer.) Second, check on your seed tag or with your seed dealer regarding the cold tolerance of your corn hybrids/soybean varieties. Hybrids and varieties vary in cold tolerance and company rating scales differ. However, be aware that imbibitional chilling is a physical phenomenon that can override genetics. Cold Stress in Corn When corn seeds imbibe (take up) water, cell membranes stretch and cells expand. When a damaged cell membrane rehydrates, it may not return to its normal shape and size. This can create a “leaky” cell. Water is at its densest at about 39°F so when cold water is imbibed, it may result in additional membrane damage. These ruptured membranes may occur in the cell walls and in the mitochondria. In the plant this action may disrupt the embryo/endosperm enzymatic conversion to energy, but mostly results in leakage of cell solutes and sugars. This, in turn, is likely to reduce growth rate and interfere with growth of the emerging seedling. Debate exists about what specific temperature and timing causes imbibitional chilling. However, corn plants that imbibe cold water (in the low 40s) in the first 48 hours after planting undoubtedly are affected. Planting when soil temperatures are above 50°F alleviates concerns of imbibitional chilling affecting corn emergence. Some scientists suggest that corn will not be injured at soil temperatures as low as 41°F; however, there is certainly some risk of injury from imbibitional chilling at those low temperatures. For best results, begin planting corn when soil temperatures are in the high 40s and the short-term forecast calls for warm days that will continue pushing soil temperatures higher. If soil temperatures are in the high 40s and the weather forecast calls for cold wet conditions within the next 48 hours, soil temperatures will likely drop and planting should be delayed until temperatures warm. Cold Stress in Soybean Soybean germination consists first of a very fast uptake of water (imbibitional phase) followed by a much slower uptake of water (osmotic phase). Chilling during the first phase can cause severe problems because the imbibed water is needed to rehydrate the cotyledons and embryo to the point that cell membranes become functional. Cold temperatures interfere with proper hydration of those membranes. The imbibitional phase is typically not very long (usually less than 24 hours) and can occur with relatively little soil moisture since the seed is dry at planting. Thus, getting a cold rain within 24 hours after planting can lead to soybean chilling injury and thus lower stands. Chilling injury is likely greater if soil temperatures were cold (less than 50° F) at planting rather than becoming cold 24 or more hours after sowing. Chilling injury occurs with temperatures of less than 50°F within 24 hours of planting; germination failure and seedling death occur at soil temperatures around 40°F. The longer the seed is in the ground at warm soil temperatures before cold temperatures occur, the less chance there is for chilling injury. Saturated soil with cold temperatures significantly reduces germination rate, thus fungicide seed treatments are recommended if planting in April or early May. Bottom line: Plant your soybeans if you think the soil temperatures won’t get cold (less than 50°F) for at least 24 hours. If you planted two or more days before the cold rain, there should be no imbibitional injury due to cold temperature. During the second phase of germination, the fully functional membranes (after imbibitional hydration) create an osmotic situation in which water diffuses into the living cells. Osmotic water uptake is slow with cold temperatures. Chilling during this phase causes little direct injury to the germinating seedling. Cold temperatures will, however, slow emergence. In conclusion, check the weather forecast, soil temperature, and hybrid/variety cold tolerance before planting. The first 24- and 48-hour periods are critical for soybean and corn, respectively, if soil temperatures dip much below 50°F. Monitor your fields based on planting date throughout the year to determine any effects on plant stand and yield. Source: University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension 
Senate Confirms Sonny Perdue for Ag Secretary
Sonny Perdue is the 31st Secretary of the United States Department of Agriculture, confirmed April 24 by the U.S. Senate. Though the former Georgia governor was President Donald Trump’s last cabinet nominee, Perdue garnered widespread support from national farm groups. His confirmation, though some felt too long in coming, was never really in question. Following the confirmation’s announcement, national farm and other interest groups commended the decision. Here are comments from a few: “Secretary Perdue is a long-time friend to me and farmers across Georgia, and soon to the millions of men and women across our country who feed and clothe our nation. He is a real-world farmer himself and knows the business inside out,” said Zippy Duvall, American Farm Bureau Federation president and Georgia farmer. “He understands the impact farm labor shortages, trade agreements and regulations have on a farmer’s bottom line and ability to stay in business from one season to the next. “There’s important work ahead for the secretary, and he’ll need to address these challenges against the backdrop of the biggest drop in farm prices and income we’ve seen in decades. But just like America’s farmers and ranchers, I know Secretary Perdue isn’t afraid of a hard day’s work. We are confident he is the right man for the job at hand,” Duvall said in a written statement. United Fresh Board member Bill Brim of Lewis Taylor Farms of Tifton, Ga., said, “I’ve known and worked with Sonny Perdue for many years, and I know what a dedicated public servant he is. I also know that he really understands and appreciates the value of the fresh produce industry to this country. I’m confident that he’ll do everything he can to work with United Fresh and all of our industry to help us meet the many challenges and opportunities we have before us. His confirmation ... is a great development for the entire fresh fruit and vegetable production chain.” “President Trump has made it clear he supports a good farm bill that is delivered on time and includes a strong safety net for our nation’s farmers. That is absolutely critical as rural America struggles against the largest 4-year percentage decline in net farm income since the start of the Great Depression. It is good to have someone at the table fighting on behalf of rural America, and I look forward to working with Secretary Perdue as we develop a strong farm bill that improves the lives of America’s farmers and ranchers,” said House Agriculture Committee Chairman K. Michael Conaway in a written statement. National Association of Conservation Districts President Brent Van Dyke said, "NACD appreciated (Perdue's) endorsement of voluntary conservation in this nomination hearing and look forward to working with him, now and throughout his tenure, to advance the adoption of voluntary conservation on working lands across this country.” Source: Brad Haire, Southeast Farm Press
Thanks for sharing this with us!
Thanks for sharing this with us!>
>
Thanks for sharing Adam!
Thanks for sharing Adam!>
Great story about one of our farmer-owners!
Great story about one of our farmer-owners!>
AURORA AG NETWORK Local Growing Degree Unit Information for Your ...
AURORA AG NETWORK Local Growing Degree Unit Information for Your Farm Every Monday we will be posting the soil temps for the previous 10 days as well as provide you a GDU forecast for the upcoming 10 days for the western, central and eastern regions. Update for the week of 4/24/17: Soil temps and conditions have been favorable for planting the past week. However, with little expected heat accumulation, the chance of rain, and low overnight temperatures, the forecast for the current week is highly unfavorable for continued planting. Germination of seed planted this week can be adversely impacted by the cold temperatures, cold-water shock, and could result in reduced seedling vigor. ? Ideal soil temps for corn are a consistent 50?F (or above), with adequate field moisture. ? Continued volatility ? Our AquaSpy moisture probes indicate temperatures are still fluctuating as much as 15?F to 18?F within 24 hours at the 4? depth. In some areas, dipping below the 50?F mark. This fluctuation can be much wider at the common planting depth of 2?. ? Be aware of your current field conditions. Fields with heavy residue can be 6? - 8?F cooler than bare ground. ? What will conditions be in the 48 hours after planting? Rapid seed water uptake (imbibition) occurs in this window and can adversely affect germination if weather or soil temperatures turn cold during this period. Emerge Together, Win Together. Uniform emergence is critical for maximum yield>
$3 Billion Nitrogen Fertilizer Plant Goes Online in SE Iowa
The small southeast Iowa town of Wever is now home to the nation's first nitrogen fertilizer plant built in more than 25 years. Iowa Fertilizer Company officially began production at its Wever plant Wednesday. "With the start of production, Iowa Fertilizer Company is now delivering a reliable high quality and domestic supply of nitrogen fertilizers that will help meet the needs of farmers in Iowa, the Midwest and around the country," Iowa Fertilizer Company President Larry Holley said. The plant will produce around 1.5 to 2 million metric tons of nitrogen fertilizer annually and has the capability to produce 4,740 tons of ammonium nitrate solutions; 1,320 of Granular Urea; 2,425 tons of ammonia; and 990 tons of diesel exhaust fluid daily. Workers can switch production between products at short notice depending on market demand. "Iowa leads the nation in corn production and if we were a country, we'd be the 4th largest corn producing country in the world" Iowa Secretary of Agriculture Bill Northey said. "To maintain the fertility and productivity of our valuable soils, Iowa is largest consumer of fertilizer in America. This new plant will provide another Iowa source for fertilizer and reduce the need for imported fertilizer in Iowa and across the nation. This plant is also another example of the wonderful agribusinesses we have in our state that create good jobs in our communities while providing vital products to our state's farmers." Ahmed El-Hoshy is CEO of OCI Americas, IFCo's parent company. He says the plant also helped boost the local economy in Lee County. "Iowa Fertilizer is the result of over $3 billion of investments to build our new facility here in Wever and has helped drive meaningful job creation throughout the state and broader region," Hoshy said. Lee County has had one of the highest unemployment rates in the state. Since the groundbreaking of Iowa Fertilizer Company, unemployment dropped from 8% to 5.3%. Governor Terry Branstad was glad the company picked Iowa for the plants location. "By collaborating with the state and local economic development leaders, Democrat and Republican officials from here in Southeast Iowa, the agriculture community, and the company itself, we were able to secure what has become one of the largest private sector projects in our state's history," Branstad said. During peaking construction, the plant employed 3,500 workers. It currently employs over 200 full-time workers to operate the plant. Annual payroll will be $25 million and $25 million in maintenance spending. Source: AgriMarketing
National
An interim grain storage expansion strategy
A grain handling expert says there could be long-term benefits from implementing a short-term strategy to increase storage capacity now. Gary Woodruff is a conditioning applications manager for GSI. He tells Brownfield as farmers work within an environment of low commodity prices and tightening margins, the ability to store and market grain has never been more important.       Continue reading An interim grain storage expansion strategy at Brownfield Ag News.      
Trump order establishes rural and agriculture task force
President Trump signed an executive order Tuesday establishing an Interagency Task Force on Agriculture and Rural Prosperity.? The signing capped a roundtable discussion among 14 farmers sharing ideas and concerns with the President, Vice-President and newly sworn U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue.? The President?s order says the mission of the taskforce, to be chaired by Secretary Perdue, is to promote economic development, job growth, innovation, and quality of life issues for rural America. The President?s order says it?s in the national interest to promote agriculture.? Continue reading Trump order establishes rural and agriculture task force at Brownfield Ag News.      
Pushing planting progress to beat the weather.
The forecast for heavy rain this weekend has many Indiana farmers pushing to get as many acres planted before the system moves in. Ben Kron farms in southwest Indiana. He says planting is off to a slow start this year.? ?There are parts of us that are running really far ahead and others where we?re actually running behind,? he says.? ?The rain showers we?ve been getting have been really spotty. There are areas where we have everything planted and others where we?re just now starting to get in the fields.? He tells Brownfield despite the slow start ? they?ve been able to better manage their weeds this year.? Continue reading Pushing planting progress to beat the weather. at Brownfield Ag News.      
Minnesota FFA elects new leadership
The new Minnesota FFA president wants to instill confidence in the state?s more than 11,000 members. Katie Benson of the Staples Motley FFA chapter says she pursued a state officer position after serving as a region vice president. “Through that role I got to reach out and talk with a lot of FFA members and really get to know them and built relationships with them.” Benson tells Brownfield she?s grown as an individual through her FFA experience. Continue reading Minnesota FFA elects new leadership at Brownfield Ag News.      
Ag groups fight for Wisconsin Farm to School budget
  Nineteen Wisconsin agricultural groups are working to save the state?s Farm to School program, but Wisconsin?s Ag Secretary says the program is not going away. ?“The budget as it’s proposed for Farm to School addresses a position. ?It does not talk about the program.” Farm to School supporters want more than 86-thousand dollars put back in the state budget.? Ben Brancel tells Brownfield the previously budgeted money never paid for a state coordinator. ? Continue reading Ag groups fight for Wisconsin Farm to School budget at Brownfield Ag News.      
Survey says most consumers rank ?no growth hormones? highest
A survey of one-thousand U.S. consumers by the University of Illinois found that the number-one production practice they want in their beef, chicken, milk and eggs is ?NO hormones.? University food economist and lead researcher?Brenna Ellison tells Brownfield the second and third practices most desired were No GMOs and humanely raised, ?We found that no growth hormones comes out as number-one no matter which product you look at. But, the ordering on non-GMO and humanely raised depends on the product type.? She says there were differences in what consumers wanted for milk and eggs versus chicken and beef when it came, ?For products like milk and eggs where animals are continual producers of the product, we found that producers placed more value on the humanely raised claim, but for things like beef and chicken meat we found that non-GMO would rate higher than humanely raised.? Ellison says there might be a difference in how people feel about animals that are continuously producing instead of going to slaughter. Continue reading Survey says most consumers rank “no growth hormones” highest at Brownfield Ag News.      
Livestock futures close higher
The cash cattle trade remained unestablished on Tuesday with bids and asking prices poorly defined. Judging by the new showlists distributed on Monday, fed supplies remain very manageable. Numbers are smaller, in most areas except Nebraska with larger numbers on the lists. Overall the late month offering appears somewhat smaller than last week. Early estimates of this week?s cattle kill are around 601,500 head, 1.1% higher than last week, and 2% above last year. Continue reading Livestock futures close higher at Brownfield Ag News.      
Farm delinquency rates trend higher
An ag economist says farm delinquency rates are trending higher. Purdue University?s David Widmar says as farm incomes decline and financial conditions continue to erode concerns about farmers? ability to repay farm debt increase.? ?The fourth quarter of 2016 for non-real estate farm loans 1.47 percent of all loans were delinquent ? according to the Federal Reserve,? he says.? ?This is up from a little less than 1 percent at the end of 2015.? Continue reading Farm delinquency rates trend higher at Brownfield Ag News.      
Milk futures sharply lower, cash cheese steady
Class III milk futures at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange were lower Tuesday, pressured by Monday’s bearish cold storage numbers, including a new March record for all cheese and a year to year increase in butter stocks. May was $.29 lower at $15.32, June was down $.43 at $15.42, July was $.33 lower at $15.89, and August was down $.33 at $16.26. Cash cheese blocks were unchanged at $1.5525. The last uncovered offer was for one load at $1.5525. Continue reading Milk futures sharply lower, cash cheese steady at Brownfield Ag News.      
Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership might still have life
U.S. Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross says the door is open to reviving Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership ? TTIP ? agreement negotiations with the European Union.? In an interview with the Financial Times, Ross cited the need to reduce the United States? $146 billion E.U. trade deficit. The move is considered a departure by the Trump administration, which has been pushing for bilateral deals with E.U. member countries. Ross met Monday with E.U. Continue reading Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership might still have life at Brownfield Ag News.      
Illinois corn planting about a third finished
Illinois had significant corn planting progress last week. As of Sunday, corn planting was 34-percent complete, according to the National Agriculture Statistics Service (NASS). Kim Curry, who farms in west-Central Illinois? Pike County, tells Brownfield he and his neighbors have corn in the ground and are moving to soybeans. ?I would say nearly all the corn is planted,? Curry told Brownfield Ag News, from his sprayer, Monday.? ?There?s a few people finishing up, but most of it?s in the ground and a lot of farmers have switched to [planting] beans.? Illinois soybean planting is five percent done, according to the latest NASS data as of Sunday.? Continue reading Illinois corn planting about a third finished at Brownfield Ag News.      
Seng says Perdue will be a champion for ag trade
The president and CEO of the US Meat Export Federation says Sonny Perdue?s confirmation to lead the USDA is huge for ag trade. Phil Seng says agriculture is one of the few industries that has a positive trade balance.? ?Sonny Perdue has given us a lot of reason to believe that he is going to continue in that tradition,? he says.? ?Extolling the virtues of trade and globalization.? I really sense he understands what trade is all about and what it means to the producer.? He says Perdue?s confirmation comes at a time when the US ag sector and its key trading partners have raised concerns about the administration?s trade policy.? Continue reading Seng says Perdue will be a champion for ag trade at Brownfield Ag News.      
Syngenta suit being tried in Minneapolis
The trial in the first of multiple lawsuits began Monday in Minneapolis against Syngenta over its U.S. introduction of genetically engineered Viptera and Duracade corn before China approved it for import.? According to a Bloomberg story, the complaints, being heard in Hennepin County District Court, say Syngenta’s release resulted in China rejecting shiploads of corn leading to price drops that hurt growers.? The suit says Syngenta marketed corn with the MIR162 trait despite knowing China had not given its approval.? Continue reading Syngenta suit being tried in Minneapolis at Brownfield Ag News.      
Missouri farmers make good progress in corn planting
There was significant corn planting progress this past week in Missouri.? The National Agriculture Statistics Service (NASS) says Missouri farmers are 46 percent done with corn, 32 percentage points behind a year ago, but central Missouri farmer Nathan Alpers is finished. ?It?s always good to have the corn in in the month of April,? Alpers told Brownfield Ag News Monday.? ?In fact, I?ve started planting beans; the earliest I?ve ever experienced it, but I started planting the east end of the beans April 19th, and got a few hundred acres planted.? Continue reading Missouri farmers make good progress in corn planting at Brownfield Ag News.      
Ag groups don?t agree on Canadian dairy policy
U.S. farm organizations don?t all agree on the U.S.-Canadian dairy trade issue.? Wisconsin Farmer?s Union?s Kara O?Conner tells Brownfield they would like to see supply management in the U.S. similar to what Canada has. ?“We think it is just good business sense to produce in relationship with what the market is demanding.” And, O?Conner says some U.S. milk processors have already asked their dairy farmers to cap production. ?“We’re seeing a really positive trend, especially led by cooperatives like Land O Lakes and Family Dairies U.S.A. Continue reading Ag groups don’t agree on Canadian dairy policy at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
Chasing Waterhemp, the Bell Cow of Weed Resistance
Waterhemp has piled on genetic muscle and built documented resistance to herbicides from six separate site of action groups in Illinois. Yet, even more alarming are the consequences of stacked resistance in waterhemp. Once resistance begins stacking, what’s the snowball effect of a weed juggernaut?  
Weather Forecast Sets Off Short Covering
Grain markets are mixed as trader wait for the forecast to develop. Farmers are using the current dry conditions to plant all that is possible.
Pathogenicity and Transmission of a Swine Influenza A(H6N6) Virus
In 2010, a H6N6 virus emerged in southern China, and since then, it has caused sporadic infections among swine.
Antimicrobial Potential of Bacteriocins in Swine Production
The routine use of antibiotics in agriculture has contributed to an increase in drug-resistant bacterial pathogens in animals that can potentially be transmitted to humans.
Vomitoxin Makes Nasty Appearance for U.S. Farm Sector
A fungus that causes “vomitoxin” has been found in some U.S. corn harvested last year, forcing poultry and pork farmers to test their grain, and giving headaches to grain growers already wrestling with massive supplies and low prices.
Canada's Morneau Sees no Surprise in Trump's Trade Rhetoric
Canadian Finance Minister Bill Morneau said on Friday there was no surprise from his perspective in U.S. President Donald Trump's statements lashing out against trade with Canada, but that officials behind the scenes were open to discussions.  
Rain Delays Idaho Potato, Wheat Planting
Rain delays Idaho potato, wheat planting
Reproduce and Validate Results
Nufarm Circling as Mega-mergers Shed Quality Assets
Investment bankers at UBS are understood to be hard at work scanning the globe for acquisition opportunities for listed agrochemicals business Nufarm, which is eager to embark on transformational deals worth potentially billions of dollars, writes Bridget Carter and Scott Murdoch on TheAustralian.com.au. It is understood Nufarm has the firepower to embark on such deals and within its sights could be a whole raft of subsidiaries from mega-mergers between ChemChina and Syngenta, Dow and DuPont and Bayer and Monsanto. UBS has worked with Nufarm before but is now thought to be mandated for Nufarm, which did not comment yesterday. Sources say the European Commission wants strong competition between research and development companies on the Continent, and that this could prevent many from embarking on big deals, placing Nufarm in a more favourable position. The Australian manufacturer of crop protection products has a market value of about $2.5 billion, with most of its revenue generated from herbicide products and the Latin American market. Read the full story on TheAustralian.com.au.
You're a Conquistador Charlie Brown!
Inocucor?s Biological Crop Input Receives Organic Certification in Canada
The biological crop input Synergro, produced by Inocucor Technologies, received official organic certification for use by Canadian growers from Pro-Cert Organic Systems Ltd. The approval verifies compliance with Canadian Organic Standards and the USDA’s National Organic Program. Synergro is a live-cell formulation for high-value produce, such as strawberries, tomatoes, lettuce and broccoli. Synergro and another Inocucor product, Synergro Free?, are among the first microbial crop inputs to be registered by the Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA). Inocucor uses a patented fermentation process to combine multi-strains of bacteria and yeasts into powerful soil and plant optimizers that are safe for people and the environment. These products naturally improve crop yields, shorten growing periods and create healthier, more resilient soils for farmers and greenhouse growers. In other news, Inocucor recently completed the $38.8 million CAD first close of its Series B financing round, with lead investor TPG Alternative and Renewable Technologies (San Francisco) and participation from Cycle Capital Management (Quebec), Desjardins Innovatech (Quebec) and Closed Loop Capital (U.S.).
Sonny Perdue Sworn in as 31st U.S. Secretary of Agriculture
Sonny Perdue, with his wife Mary, takes the oath of office administered by Associate Justice Clarence Thomas in the U.S. Supreme Court Building, becoming the 31st U.S. Secretary of Agriculture. Sonny Perdue was sworn in as the 31st U.S. Secretary of Agriculture by fellow Georgian and Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court Clarence Thomas in a brief ceremony today at the Supreme Court building. The U.S. Senate confirmed Secretary Perdue by a vote of 87-to-11 on Monday evening. After Secretary Perdue took the oath of office, he addressed employees at the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) before getting to work on his first day. Also this morning, USDA launched his official Twitter handle: @SecretarySonny. ?The only legacy that I seek is the only one that any grandparent or parent seeks ? to be good stewards, and to hand off our nation, our home, our fields, our forests, and our farms to the next generation in better shape than we found it,? Perdue said. ?Making sure that Americans who make their livelihoods in the agriculture industry have the ability to thrive will be one of my top priorities. I am committed to serving the customers of USDA, and I will be an unapologetic advocate for American agriculture.? Perdue?s policies as U.S. Secretary of Agriculture will be guided by four principles which will inform his decisions. First, he will maximize the ability of the men and women of America?s agriculture and agribusiness sector to create jobs, to produce and sell the foods and fiber that feed and clothe the world, and to reap the earned reward of their labor. It should be the aim of the American government to remove every obstacle and give farmers, ranchers, and producers every opportunity to prosper. Second, he will prioritize customer service every day for American taxpayers and consumers. They will expect, and have every right to demand, that their government conduct the people?s business efficiently, effectively, and with the utmost integrity. Third, as Americans expect a safe and secure food supply, USDA will continue to serve in the critical role of ensuring the food we put on the table to feed our families meets the strict safety standards we?ve established. Food security is a key component of national security, because hunger and peace do not long coexist. And fourth, Perdue will always remember that America?s agricultural bounty comes directly from the land. And today, those land resources sustain more than 320 million Americans and countless millions more around the globe. Perdue?s father?s words still ring true: We?re all stewards of the land, owned or rented, and our responsibility is to leave it better than we found it. ?As secretary, I will champion the concerns of farmers, ranchers, foresters, and producers, and will work tirelessly to solve the issues facing our farm families,? Perdue said. ?I am proud to have been given this opportunity and look forward to rolling up my sleeves and getting to work as we continue to move the USDA and our nation forward.? Upon nominating Secretary Perdue in January, President Donald J. Trump said, ?Sonny Perdue is going to accomplish great things as Secretary of Agriculture. From growing up on a farm to being governor of a big agriculture state, he has spent his whole life understanding and solving the challenges our farmers face, and he is going to deliver big results for all Americans who earn their living off the land.?