Ashburn VA

Saturday
Partly Cloudy
87°F / 62°F
Wind: 7 ENE
Average Humidity: 60
The Next Three Days

Sunday
Clear
89°F / 62°F
Wind: 8 SE
Humidity: 48

Monday
Chance of a Thunderstorm
88°F / 68°F
Wind: 9 S
Humidity: 63

Tuesday
Chance of a Thunderstorm
89°F / 65°F
Wind: 9 ESE
Humidity: 66
Close
@C - CORN - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Jul '16 390'0 373'4 384'4 -2'6
Sep '16 395'0 378'0 389'0 -3'4
Dec '16 400'4 382'4 394'2 -3'4
Mar '17 407'0 390'0 401'6 -3'4
May '17 410'4 394'2 405'6 -3'4
Jul '17 414'0 397'0 409'0 -3'0
@S - SOYBEANS - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Jul '16 1132'0 1099'2 1103'0 -21'4
Aug '16 1131'0 1097'4 1101'4 -22'0
Sep '16 1116'6 1082'0 1086'2 -22'6
Nov '16 1109'4 1072'4 1078'4 -23'0
Jan '17 1106'4 1070'2 1076'4 -22'4
Mar '17 1071'2 1042'0 1048'0 -19'2
May '17 1065'0 1035'4 1040'6 -17'4
@K - HARD RED WINTER WHEAT - KCBT
Month High Low Last Chg
Jul '16 428'4 418'0 422'6 -5'0
Sep '16 446'2 435'4 441'0 -4'4
Dec '16 471'4 460'6 466'6 -4'0
Mar '17 488'0 477'6 483'2 -4'2
@L - LIVE CATTLE - CME
Month High Low Last Chg
Jun '16 116.450 114.100 114.700 -2.050
Aug '16 113.275 110.850 110.875 -2.975
@C - COTTON #2 - ICEFU
Month High Low Last Chg
Jul '16 64.94 63.70 64.50 -0.38
Oct '16 65.43 64.06 64.83 -0.79
Dec '16 65.43 63.83 64.42 -1.00
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Local
Identifying and Correcting Manganese Deficiency in Soybeans
Manganese deficiency is the most common nutrient deficiency seen in soybeans in Michigan. The manganese deficiency symptoms depicted in photos 1 and 2 are likely to occur on muck or dark-colored sands with pH levels above 5.8 and lakebed or out-wash soils having pH levels above 6.5. Lately, I’ve seen more situations where manganese deficiency symptoms are occurring on coarse-textured soils having low organic matter levels. In these cases, the soil pH was above 6.5 and in one field, the pH was 7.0. The high pH was the result of applying too much lime. Michigan State University Extension advises that the best way to avoid this situation is to have your fields grid-sampled or sampled by management zones and apply lime using variable rate technology. Avoid raising soil pH levels above 6.5. Because increasing the available manganese levels in the soil is difficult, deficiency symptoms will reoccur in the same areas each year soybeans are grown. Broadcast manganese fertilizer applications are not recommended due to rapid fixation in the soil. Band applications of chelated manganese fertilizers are not recommended either, due to high fertilizer costs. However, manganese sulfate can be applied in a 2-by-2 band at planting when soil test levels are low. Foliar application of manganese sulfate at 1 to 2 pounds per acre of actual manganese is the most economical and effective method for correcting manganese deficiency. Apply 1 pound per acre of actual manganese when the first deficiency symptoms appear (six inch tall plants) and apply another pound per acre in 10 days if deficiency symptoms reappear. Manganese sulfate should not be tank-mixed with glyphosate as the performance of both products will be reduced. Ideally, the glyphosate should be applied first and the manganese sulfate applied at least three days later. In some cases, the manganese sulfate may need to be applied before the glyphosate. In this case, the two applications should be separated by at least seven days. If you must tank-mix a manganese fertilizer with glyphosate, always use an EDTA chelated manganese fertilizer. It is important to add the ingredients to the tank in the following order: Water Ammonium sulfate at 17 pounds per 100 gallons Glyphosate EDTA chelated manganese fertilizer A Soybean Management and Research Technology (SMaRT) trial conducted at two responsive locations (muck soils) in 2013 showed that manganese sulfate monohydrate fertilizer increased soybean yields by 1.9 bushels per acre over an EDTA chelate manganese fertilizer. Another SMaRT on-farm research trial was conducted at two potentially responsive sites (soil pH = 7.4) in 2013. The results confirmed that manganese foliar fertilizer application in the absence of visible deficiency symptoms will not increase soybean yields. In fact, research conducted by the Ohio State University in 2008 and 2009 found that foliar applications of manganese fertilizer in the absence of foliar deficiency symptoms actually reduced soybean yields. Source: Mike Staton, Michigan State University Extension 
National
Cheese stocks hit record in May
High production levels and increased international competition continued to push U.S. cheese stocks to record levels for?another straight month. At the end of May, the USDA says cheese stocks, at 1.2 billion pounds, were up 12 percent on the year and the highest total for that month since 1917. Butter came out at almost 325 million pounds, a 23 percent year to year jump, also on rising production levels. May?s dairy production numbers are out July 6th. ? The post Cheese stocks hit record in May appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
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Local
Identifying and Correcting Manganese Deficiency in Soybeans
Manganese deficiency is the most common nutrient deficiency seen in soybeans in Michigan. The manganese deficiency symptoms depicted in photos 1 and 2 are likely to occur on muck or dark-colored sands with pH levels above 5.8 and lakebed or out-wash soils having pH levels above 6.5. Lately, I’ve seen more situations where manganese deficiency symptoms are occurring on coarse-textured soils having low organic matter levels. In these cases, the soil pH was above 6.5 and in one field, the pH was 7.0. The high pH was the result of applying too much lime. Michigan State University Extension advises that the best way to avoid this situation is to have your fields grid-sampled or sampled by management zones and apply lime using variable rate technology. Avoid raising soil pH levels above 6.5. Because increasing the available manganese levels in the soil is difficult, deficiency symptoms will reoccur in the same areas each year soybeans are grown. Broadcast manganese fertilizer applications are not recommended due to rapid fixation in the soil. Band applications of chelated manganese fertilizers are not recommended either, due to high fertilizer costs. However, manganese sulfate can be applied in a 2-by-2 band at planting when soil test levels are low. Foliar application of manganese sulfate at 1 to 2 pounds per acre of actual manganese is the most economical and effective method for correcting manganese deficiency. Apply 1 pound per acre of actual manganese when the first deficiency symptoms appear (six inch tall plants) and apply another pound per acre in 10 days if deficiency symptoms reappear. Manganese sulfate should not be tank-mixed with glyphosate as the performance of both products will be reduced. Ideally, the glyphosate should be applied first and the manganese sulfate applied at least three days later. In some cases, the manganese sulfate may need to be applied before the glyphosate. In this case, the two applications should be separated by at least seven days. If you must tank-mix a manganese fertilizer with glyphosate, always use an EDTA chelated manganese fertilizer. It is important to add the ingredients to the tank in the following order: Water Ammonium sulfate at 17 pounds per 100 gallons Glyphosate EDTA chelated manganese fertilizer A Soybean Management and Research Technology (SMaRT) trial conducted at two responsive locations (muck soils) in 2013 showed that manganese sulfate monohydrate fertilizer increased soybean yields by 1.9 bushels per acre over an EDTA chelate manganese fertilizer. Another SMaRT on-farm research trial was conducted at two potentially responsive sites (soil pH = 7.4) in 2013. The results confirmed that manganese foliar fertilizer application in the absence of visible deficiency symptoms will not increase soybean yields. In fact, research conducted by the Ohio State University in 2008 and 2009 found that foliar applications of manganese fertilizer in the absence of foliar deficiency symptoms actually reduced soybean yields. Source: Mike Staton, Michigan State University Extension 
Irrigation Management: Measuring Soil and Application Uniformity
Irrigation of crop fields is a common practice in areas of the country that receive little rainfall or have soils with little water-holding capacity. A few regions in Michigan that have light-textured soils have seen a significant increase in irrigated acres in the last 50 years, including counties in the south central and southwest part of the state. Farmers have used different approaches in deciding when to irrigate, including assessing the look of the crop, checking soil wetness to shovel depth and, more recently, more sophisticated methods like irrigation schedulers that are based on evapotranspiration rate estimates (see “Irrigation Scheduling Tools” by Michigan State University Extension and Purdue University Extension). While these approaches can be used successfully, a more direct method for measuring how much soil moisture is available to the crop involves the use of soil moisture monitors. Wally Hekter, a second-generation farmer with Legacy Land Farms, Inc. in Michigan’s St. Joseph County, has been experimenting with soil moisture monitors for the past three years and has seen the benefits of utilizing this technology. Although he admits using irrigation schedulers and observations of the crop and the soil surface are useful, he says the first major benefit of using moisture sensors is knowing exactly how much water he has available for the crop at any given time – what he calls “balancing the checkbook.” “It is good to measure what is going in (irrigation and rainfall) and what is going out (evapotranspiration estimates), but it is important to balance the checkbook to make sure you have in the ‘bank’ what you think you have,” says Hekter. The second major benefit is the peace of mind he has, knowing that he does not need to guess whether he should irrigate on any given day because he can make the decision based on actual scientific soil measurements. Hekter has a set of sensors in each of his fields, one each at 1-, 2- and 3-foot depths. The figure below is a season-long graph of soil moisture as measured with these sensors. The gray line at 50 centibars (cbar) was considered the wilting point for the crop in a sandy loam soil, while 0 cbar represents the maximum water-holding capacity for this field. The goal is to irrigate enough to keep soil moisture below 50 cbar, but not so much that water (and nutrients) is lost through leaching. We can see that the top 1 foot dried out the fastest early in the season and reached 50 cbar a few times in July. The soil at 2 and 3 feet began to dry out beginning in July and August, respectively, showing that the crop roots had grown downward and were extracting water from those depths. Using this technology, Hekter knows not only what the water-holding capacity of his field is – and therefore how much needs to be applied each time – but also when to water to avoid stress to the crop. He said the equipment for each field pays for itself if he can avoid watering two times that he would have previously. Another important aspect of irrigation is ensuring application is uniform across the field (see “Evaluating Irrigation System Uniformity” by MSU Extension and Purdue Extension). This is critical not only for plant water needs, but also when applying fertilizer or crop protection products. Tony Belcher, a sales and service representative for Koviack Irrigation and Farm Services in Three Rivers, Michigan, has worked on all aspects of irrigation from service, sales, installation and design in residential and agricultural settings. He stresses with his clients that it is critical to know the actual flow rate at the pivot at different pump speeds, the actual travel speed of the rig through the field and the water output all along the irrigation boom and with the end gun. He has seen cases where a farmer thought he was applying a given amount of water, but the actual application varied from 30–40 percent more (typically near the pivot) or less than that amount. He recommends measuring the actual output at multiple points along each span every five to six years to make sure nozzles were selected correctly and as a check to see whether equipment is wearing uniformly. For more information about irrigation management, visit the MSU Extension Irrigation website.  Source: Eric Anderson, Michigan State University Extension 
Corn Growers Put on Alert for Southern Rust and Tar Spot
Two corn diseases are already making some news this season. Southern rust and tar spot have been detected in southern states and could potentially make their way to Kentucky this season. So, keeping a lookout for these two diseases is a good idea. Southern rust Southern rust (caused by Puccinia polysora) made an appearance in Kentucky last summer, and turned many combines orange during harvest because of the large number of orange-colored pustules present on the leaves. Although the fungus that causes southern rust is not able to over-winter in Kentucky, it has already been found in corn fields in Texas, Louisiana, and Georgia this year. This pathogen will move north during the season, but timing is everything. If the disease is found in Kentucky corn fields prior to the milk stage (R3 growth stage), then yield losses may occur. Wet spring weather did delay corn planting in some areas this year, so the table could be set for this disease to be a problem, especially in late-planted corn. Tracking the whereabouts of southern rust in the U.S. will help determine when it may move into Kentucky, and this will continue to be a topic addressed in Kentucky Pest News — which can be found here — this season. Many fungicides are able to effectively protect against infection by the southern rust pathogen. Extension plant pathologists from corn-growing states have put together a fungicide efficacy table for corn (Fungicide Efficacy for Control of Corn Diseases, BP-160-W), which is published by Purdue Tar spot Tar spot (caused by Phyllachora maydis) was found in the U.S. for the first time late in the 2015 growing season in the northern portions of the neighboring states, Illinois and Indiana. Although this disease appeared too late in the growing season to cause yield losses, it was observed across several counties in both of those states. On June 10, 2016, tar spot was detected on corn growing in Palm County, Fla. Although little is known about the ability of this disease to cause losses to corn grown in the U.S., it is important to be on the lookout for the disease. Since this disease has never been reported in Kentucky, it is critically important to work with your local county Extension agent to submit any suspect samples to the University of Kentucky Plant Disease Diagnostic Lab. Source: Carl Bradley, University of Kentucky Extension Plant Pathologist 
USDA Changing Insurance Rules for Replanting Crops, Counting Double-crop Acres
USDA’s Federal Crop Insurance Corp. is changing rules and definitions for replanting crops and counting double-crop acres starting in the 2017 crop year. The rule changes, meant to clarify crop-insurance policies for farmers and insurers, will be published Wednesday in the Federal Register. USDA is trying to clarify rules regarding when it is “practical to replant.” Concerns have been raised regarding the definition, difficulty and inconsistency in the replanting language on crop-insurance policies. Insurance companies have varying interpretations regarding when it is practical to replant even when adjusters from different companies are working on an early season crop loss in the same area. USDA wants to set a clearer definition for when a field and crop is considered practical to replant, and if not replanted, when coverage would not be provided for that initial lost crop. The new definition on “practical to replant” also would include exceptions for weather conditions that make it impossible to replant, or would have an effect on seed germination and emergence. According to the rule language, USDA will consider it practical to replant by looking at moisture availability, marketing window, condition of the field and time until crop matures for that replanted crop to ensure it will reach maturity before the end of the insurance period. It will be practical to replant before the late-planting period, or on or before the final planting date if there is no late-planting period for that crop. However, the exception will apply if it’s physically impossible to replant the acreage or if there is no chance that the seeds would germinate, emerge or develop into a healthy plant. Another change would make it easier on farmers who double crop certain acres. Farmers have a problem keeping records on acreage and production in areas that may be double cropped, or not. For instance, if a farmer has two fields in the same crop-insurance unit, a farmer may only double crop on one field and not the other, but the farmer is expected to keep production records showing that part of that unit was double cropped and part of it was not. Current double-cropping requirements don’t take into account changes in a farm operation such as accounting for added acres. The rule change will deal with both added acreages on a farm and account for multiple crop rotations. USDA is changing the rules to allow eligible double-cropping acres to be based on either the highest number of acres double cropped in the last four crop years, or the percentage of acres historically double cropped. The double-cropping rule would make it easier to deal with records production. If a farmer doesn’t have specific records on production and acreage for the double-cropped acres, then USDA will allocate the first and second crop production to acreage in proportion to the liability for the acreage that was double cropped and acreage that was not double cropped. For example, if a farmer who doesn’t maintain separate acres for a double-cropping field operates a 100-acre farm that has historically double cropped 50 acres of wheat followed by soybeans, then the farmer has 50% of acres that are considered historically double-cropped. So if the farmer buys an additional 200 acres, then the number of acres eligible for double cropping would be 150 acres, or 50% of the total farm. While USDA is publishing the rule as “final,” the Federal Crop Insurance Corp. will have a 60-day comment period that could prompt possible further changes in the rules. More details on the rule change for practical to replant and double cropping will likely be provided by USDA’s Risk Management Agency to crop insurers and farmers as the marketing year begins for the 2017 crops. Details from the Federal Register posting can be found at https://www.federalregister.gov. Source: Chris Clayton, The Progressive Farmer
National GMO Labels a Step Closer, but Not Everybody's Happy
Leaders of the Senate Agriculture Committee on Thursday announced agreement on what could become the nation’s first mandatory national standard for labeling foods that contain genetically modified organisms — better known as GMOs. Kansas Sen. Pat Roberts, the Republican committee chairman, and Michigan Sen. Debbie Stabenow, the ranking Democrat, negotiated a compromise just ahead of the first mandatory state GMO labeling law taking effect in Vermont. The national standard still faces a Senate vote and agreement from the House of Representatives, which voted against mandatory on-package GMO labels earlier this year. The new agreement requires foods from big companies to carry one of three GMO notices — text, a symbol or an electronic digital link. Small food manufacturers would also have the option of using telephone numbers or websites on packages. The Coalition for Safe Affordable Food, a food industry group that lobbied extensively to avoid any mandatory on-package GMO labels accepted the Senate compromise as a solution that “increases consumer access to additional product information without stigmatizing a safe, proven technology that is relied on by American farmers.” “While Vermont’s GMO on-package labeling mandate is set to take effect on July 1,” coalition leaders said in a statement, “we remain confident that, with today’s Senate agreement, a national solution can be passed into law by Congress before the negative impacts of Vermont’s law become pervasive. “ Just Label It, a group of consumer advocates and organic food producers welcomed the requirement for on-package GMO disclosure, but fretted over the digital link option. “While we are pleased this proposal will finally create a national, mandatory GMO disclosure system, protects organic labels, and will cover more food than Vermont’s groundbreaking GMO labeling law, we are disappointed that the proposal will require many consumers to rely on smartphones to learn basic information about their food,” Gary Hirshberg, chairman of Just Label It, said in a statement. “This proposal falls short of what consumers rightly expect — a simple at-a-glance disclosure on the package.” Minnesota-based General Mills, which had already changed its packages to conform with the Vermont law, said it needed to study the Roberts-Stabenow plan to see if it would require any additional changes. But the company welcomed the possibility of a countrywide standard. “Without this national solution we risked having a system of 50 different regulations impacting our packages,” the company said in a statement. Hormel, another of Minnesota’s major food companies, endorsed the compromise and called for its passage in the Senate and the House. “We understand our consumers’ expectations are evolving, especially when it comes to the ingredients in their food, and believe a solution like SmartLabel™ [the digital link option] will provide them with transparent, consistent, science-based product ingredient information” the company said in a statement. Democratic Rep. Collin Peterson of Minnesota, the ranking minority member on the House Agriculture Committee said he would study the Senate proposal. “I am committed to finding a solution that balances the consumer desire for information with the scientific evidence of the safety of these crops,” Peterson said. Source: Minneapolis StarTribune
Nebraska Ag Update - June 23, 2016
Nebraska Ag Updates
USDA to Dip Into Extra Fund to Meet Farm Loans
Secretary Tom Vilsack has informed Congress that he plans to tap into a $500 million discretionary fund to help USDA’s Farm Service Agency deal with a projected shortfall in money available for guaranteed loans, Agri-Pulse reports. Thanks to “low commodity prices and a dramatic decline in farm income over the past two years,” FSA has just about run out of the $2 billion Congress approved for its loan program three months before the end of the fiscal year, according to the news service. Eight national farm and financial groups asked Congress in June for more funds for operating loans. Source: Politico
Low-pressure Tires Can Reduce Compaction, Increase Yield
Studies show that one way to improve yields is to minimize soil compaction by using tires designed to operate at lower air pressures compared to standard radial tires. In fact, a three-year study by Harper Adams University in the United Kingdom shows that Michelin's Ultraflex Technology IF (Increased Flexion) and VF (Very High Flexion) tires delivers a yield increase of up to 4 percent compared to standard radial tires. To meet market demand, Michelin is introducing three new tires for North American farmers with Ultraflex technology. The three new tire models are Michelin SprayBib VF 480/80R46 177D, a sprayer tire; Michelin SprayBibTM VF 380/90R54 176D, a tire for high-clearance sprayers and row crop-tractors; and Michelin CereXBibTM IF 1000/55R32 CFO 188A8, which is the largest harvester tire in Michelin’s portfolio.  This tire is designed for large harvesters and grain carts, which are among the heaviest machines and have surpassed the weight capacity of most radial tires. “As farm equipment has grown larger and heavier in recent years, farmers now cover more acres per day, but soil compaction has become a greater challenge,” said Mike Pantaleo, customer engineering support for Michelin Agriculture tires. “Michelin Ultraflex tires address this issue by operating at lower pressures than standard radial tires, therefore producing a larger footprint. This larger footprint distributes the weight of the machine over the largest area possible to reduce compaction.” Pantaleo explains that Michelin Ultraflex VF tires can be operated at up to 40 percent less air pressure than standard radial tires which results in a larger footprint that reduces soil compaction and can improve yield. Source: Southeast Farm Press
What Causes Purple Corn?
It is not unusual to have some corn producers call the Michigan State University Extension office to express concern about purplish coloration this time of year. There are several factors that contribute to early season purple coloration, but the major factors are likely to be early season stress and restricted root growth. Corn leaves produce sugars by photosynthesis. These sugars are ordinarily metabolized to generate energy for further shoot and root growth and development. However, when growth slows down – for example, when temperatures get too cold – the sugars tend to accumulate in the leaf. This triggers anthocyanin pigment formation and causing the purplish color (see photo). Restricted root growth induced by compacted soils and compacted furrow side-walls is also closely associated with purpling of corn. On some fields, the purplish color is more visible in field headlands and in spots within fields and wheel tracks. Sometimes the phosphorus (P) deficiency also causes purple coloration, but early season P deficiencies may be related to the restricted root growth. Soil test levels should determine P sufficiency in the soil. If sufficient P is present, adding more phosphorus will not turn purple leaves green. Research on understanding purple corn has shown the anthocyanin pigment is produced only on the surface layer of cells and does not affect the chlorophyll content in the leaf. Therefore, early season purple coloration does not generally impact corn yield. Furthermore, there are some genetic differences in the predisposition of corn hybrids to purple coloration. Young corn plants that turn purple usually grow out of the symptoms after about the six-leaf stage. When the weather warms up and rapid growth resumes, sugars are metabolized normally and plants attain their normal green color. If the problem persists, then some remedial measures such as soil testing and tillage practices are needed. Michigan State University Extension recommends farmers scout early season corn fields for compacted soil, nutrient deficiency symptoms, pesticide misapplications, root injury or deformities, irregular planting depth and emergence. Some remedial actions such as tillage, equipment calibration and soil testing can be implemented this fall or early spring. Source: Michigan State University Extension
Early Control of Volunteer Wheat Advised in Hail-damaged Crop
Volunteer wheat doesn’t all emerge at the same time, unfortunately. Some can start emerging early where wheat in the heading stage was damaged by hail, said Dallas Peterson, K-State Research and Extension weed management specialist. Where volunteer wheat is emerging early, producers should consider making their first control measures sooner than they might like, he said. “Producers often like to wait several weeks after harvest before making their first herbicide application to control volunteer wheat,” Peterson noted. “This allows as much volunteer as possible to emerge before spraying it or tilling it the first time. Often, a second application or tillage operation will be needed later in the summer to eliminate the green bridge to wheat.” But where wheat was hailed out and volunteer has already emerged at the time of harvest, control should begin immediately after harvest if possible. “Even if this ends up requiring one more field pass than normal to keep volunteer under control throughout the summer, starting early in this situation will help prevent even bigger problems down the road. It should be noted that grazing volunteer is not an effective control option because there is green wheat material left and the mites survive in that material,” Peterson said. Why the need for early control of volunteer in hailed-out wheat? Where wheat suffered hail damage after heading, volunteer often emerges even before the existing field is harvested – as much as two to three weeks earlier than it would normally emerge after harvest, he said. This volunteer wheat is especially likely to become infected with wheat curl mites and lead to problems later in the season if left uncontrolled, said J.P. Michaud, entomologist at K-State’s Agricultural Research Center in Hays. Wheat curl mites will move off growing wheat as the green tissue dries down and dies, Michaud explained. After moving off the existing wheat at or near harvest time, the mites need to find green tissue of a suitable host soon or they will die of desiccation, he said. “Research has found that the mites can live quite a few hours off the plant, and up to 24 hours under low temperature conditions, so significant numbers of mites may be blown in from farther away than previously thought,” Michaud said. If there is young volunteer wheat growing at the time the current wheat crop is being harvested in the nearby region, the mites can quickly infest those volunteer plants and survive, he said. “If volunteer has emerged and is still alive shortly after harvest in hailed-out wheat, wheat curl mites could easily build up rapidly and spread to other volunteer wheat that emerges later in the season. On the other hand, if this early-emerging volunteer is controlled shortly after harvest, that will help greatly in breaking the green bridge. If more volunteer emerges during the summer, follow-up control will still be needed,” Michaud said. Volunteer wheat is not the only host of the wheat curl mite, he added. Recent research has evaluated the suitability of wild grasses as hosts for both the curl mite and the wheat streak virus. “Barnyardgrass topped the list in terms of suitability for both virus and mites, but is fortunately not that common in wheat fields. In contrast, green foxtail, although a rather poor host, could be an important disease reservoir simply because of its abundance. Take note of significant stands of these grasses in marginal areas and control them as you would volunteer wheat,” Michaud advised. If volunteer wheat and other hosts are not controlled throughout the summer and are infested with wheat curl mites, the mites will survive until fall and could infest newly planted wheat at that time, he said. Wheat curl mite infestations of wheat often lead to wheat streak mosaic infections. Volunteer wheat also serves as a potential host and green bridge for Hessian fly, greenbugs, bird cherry-oat aphids, and Russian wheat aphids, he added. Source: Kansas State University Extension
NDA Announces New Testing Service, Locations for Pesticide Exams
LINCOLN ? The Nebraska Department of Agriculture (NDA) is pleased to announce a new computer-based testing service for people taking pesticide applicator exams in order to receive their licenses. NDA has signed a contract with a national testing company to offer pesticide applicator exams at nine different testing sites throughout Nebraska. NDA will still offer pesticide applicator testing in person, but the addition of these computer-based testing sites will give people more options when it comes to taking their exams.
Weather Markets in Full Play As Grain Prices Plummet
Grains plummeted, led by a fall of nearly 6% in corn, as funds rushed for the exit after prospects for US crops improved. "Grains continue to trade lower today on good weather forecasts and good crop conditions," said Jennifer Webster, at CHS Heding. And fund appetite appears to have been waning, even before the outlook improved. "Our markets were due for a correction before the forecasts changed," said Tregg Cronin at Halo Commodities. "Funds have their bellies full right now, and need another catalyst for another leg higher." Good condition Early pressure on corn futures came overnight, as weekly crop ratings from the USDA showed the US corn crop unchanged, at 75% good or excellent. "After last week's heat, trade was surprised to see corn crop conditions unchanged," said Kim Rugel, at Benson Quinn Commodities. "This is 1 point off of our all-time record for this date," Iowa-based broker Don Roose noted, talking to Agrimoney. Improving weather story And with the corn still in good condition, the market is now seeing the likelihood of hot dry weather recede. "The big thing is we're getting close to pollination," said Mr Roose, noting that current weather models are suggesting wetter, cooler weather during the crucial month of July than previously thought. Terry Reilly, at Futures International, told Agrimoney that "the crop weather story is improving". "The US weather outlook this morning was little changed from what we had yesterday," he said. "But what that does is verify the wetter outlook than we had last week." And the pressure on corn futures only intensified come midday, when the weather models turned even more benign. "It would mean less heat and more moisture for the Plains and Midwest," said Darell Holaday, at Country Futures. Brazilian prices fall In Brazil, domestic corn prices are plummeting as the second crop corn harvest picks up pace. As of Monday night, Brazilian corn is down 10% from its peak two weeks ago, to six-week low of $14.25 per 60 kg sack. In Brazilian real terms, prices are down around 9% over the same period, to R$48.40 a sack. "Corn prices began to fall hard last week, especially in Parana and the Midwest," said the Brazilian think tank Cepea. "As the second crop corn harvest in the Centre-South of the country advances, domestic grain availability is gradually increasing," Cepea said. "For almost the first time this year, buyers face... can exert pressure." Booming imports There was a touch of support, as customs data for May showed Chinese corn imports jumped 156% month-on-month, to 1.037m tonnes. China is not currently a major corn importer, due to a tightly regulated domestic market that limits imports and keeps prices above world records. But there are ideas that ongoing grain market reforms could allow heavier Chinese imports, once government reserves are shifted. Also noteworthy was the fact that imports dried distillers grains fell, suggesting there is less of a market for corn substitutes, which was the result of a loophole in the market regulation. But rapid fund selling, in the face of an improving US weather outlook, drove a massive selloff in corn. July corn futures finished down 5.7%, at $3.97 1/4 a bushel. 'Maturing rapidly' In wheat, the USDA crop report showed the US winter wheat harvest 25% complete, two points ahead of expectations. In Kansas, wheat conditions improved by 1 point, to 62% good or excellent. Mr Cronin said this was "a sign yields are proving better than expectations". Mr Cronin said there should be "a swift harvest in the Northern Plains as well given the heat experienced and that forecast which is pushing wheat to maturity quite rapidly". July wheat futures in Kansas City finished down 3.3%, at $4.36 1/2 a bushel. July Chicago wheat futures finished down 2.8%, at $4.58 1/2 a bushel. Strong export demand limits losses Given the weakness in corn and wheat, soybeans were hardly likely to come off unscathed, but decent export demand helped limit losses for the oilseed. Chinese soybean import numbers for May were strong, at 7.664m tonnes, up more than 25% over the past month. And the USDA announce fresh export sales of 132,000 tonnes of soybeans for deliver to China, and 126,000 tonnes to unknown destinations. July soybean futures finished down 0.9%, at $11.33 1/4 a bushel. Chinese buying falls off in sugar... Raw sugar futures continued to fall away, as demand from the world's top importer eased. Chinese May sugar imports were down 74% year on year, at 135,455 tonnes. "There is a lot of talk that a down side correction is coming after the recent rally that appears to be stalling out," said Jack Scoville, at Price Futures Group. October raw sugar settled down 2.1%, at 19.34 cents a pound. August white sugar settled down 1.0%, at $531.2 per tonne. ...and in cotton Chinese cotton imports in May were also sharply down, at 80,000 tonnes, down 52% year on year. And US cotton crop condition improved by 1 point, to 54% good or excellent. Tobin Gorey, at CBA, also noted that prospects in India are improving. "Forecasters say monsoonal rains will finally start to spread north this week," he said. "If Indian planting picks up as a result that would be a bearish influence on the market." December cotton futures settled down 2.4%, at 64.39 cents a pound. Source: AgriMarketing
Working Capital Changes Projected for Grain Farms in 2016
Corn and soybean prices have increased in the past several months (see farmdoc daily, June 13, 2016), leading to improved 2016 income prospects. Even given these price increases, working capital is still projected to be negative for rented farmland, leading to a continuing need to cut costs. When making these projections, yields are at their expected levels. Lower yields would result in higher working capital losses. More accurate income and working capital prospects will be known in August, once yield levels are more certain and attended price responses come into clearer focus. Read the entire article here.
Sun, Heat and Wind Drying Out Soil Around Texas
Soil moisture indexes around the state are beginning to drop as higher temperatures and sunny days mark summer’s arrival. Heat, sun and wind all affect soil moisture as well as the crop water demand, said Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service agronomist Dr. Jourdan Bell, Amarillo. Summertime conditions can significantly increase crop water use as days become sunnier and temperatures climb into the mid-to-upper 90s or 100 degrees and beyond, she said. In the High Plains, extended periods without precipitation, in addition to heat, low relative humidity and windy conditions can drive crop water demands up to almost half an inch per day. While irrigation helps meet water demands for some crops, the region’s dryland production can be quickly impacted by elevated temperatures and extended dry periods, Bell said. Successful dryland crop production is dependent on stored soil moisture to carry the crop through extended hot and dry conditions. Many producers maintain crop residues from the previous crop on the soil surface in either reduced tillage or no-till systems to minimize evaporative losses from the soil surface, she said. In addition to residue management, canopy closure between plants helps minimize soil evaporative losses, Bell said. So far, many summer crops have not reached canopy closure. Canopy closure is critical to minimizing early season evaporative losses from the soil surface in addition to intercepting sunlight to increase crop production under both dryland and irrigated conditions. “Crop water use is picking up with elevated temperatures, and dryland crops that didn’t start with good moisture and surface residue will soon experience water stress without rain,” she said. Different regions of the state welcomed hotter, drier conditions to help with flooding and saturated soils. AgriLife Extension agronomist Dr. Josh McGinty, Corpus Christi, said humidity levels have been high following weeks of rain and flooding in southeast and East Texas. McGinty said sun, higher temperatures and wind were needed in many areas of the state to dry saturated and flooded fields to allow crops to recover and grow. But some areas in the same regions were passed over by rainfall and are now showing signs of stress from lack of moisture. “It’s a strange year,” he said. “There are some producers along the coast with flooded fields and good hot, dry weather is what they need, but then within a 30-minute drive to the west, you see fields that are moisture-stressed.” Despite many acres being stressed by too much or too little rain, overall moisture levels have cotton and grain crops looking extremely good with potentially heavy yields, McGinty said. As always, it will take timely rains by the end of June or early July to maintain a good moisture index for some crops, such as cotton, and allow others, like grain crops, to continue to dry for harvest. The high and low levels of moisture may impact individual producers but McGinty said spring rains have many acres of crops and forages looking exceptional. “A lot of the corn fields look like it could be a record year for yields but that production will probably be offset by areas that experienced severe flooding and make for an average year overall,” he said. AgriLife Extension district summaries can be found here. Source: Texas AgriLife Extension
Final Rule on Drones Issued by FAA
The Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday rolled out its final regulations for commercial flight of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS), also known as drones. The regulations (officially dubbed Part 107) restrict drone operations to within the line of sight of a certified operator. The aircraft also must weigh less than 55 pounds, stay below a maximum altitude of 400 feet and travel at speeds under 100 miles per hour. Night flying is prohibited unless the device has proper anticollision lighting. Those wishing to operate a drone for commercial purposes will have to "demonstrate aeronautical knowledge" either by passing a knowledge test "at an FAA-approved knowledge testing center" or by holding a non-student Part 61 pilot certificate (with a completed flight review in the previous 24 months) and completing an online training course through the FAA. However, there is a bullet point on the FAA's summary page of dos and don'ts that says "most of the restrictions" don't apply "if the applicant demonstrates that his or her operation can safely be conducted under the terms of a certificate of waiver." R.J. Karney, director of congressional relations with the American Farm Bureau Federation, said AFBF sees the new rule as a "great initial step," but suggested it should be tweaked "so farmers can utilize the technology to its fullest and maximize its potential." He said AFBF would like to see the altitude limit back at 500 feet, as originally proposed, and the line-of-sight restriction adjusted. "Overall," he said, "it's nice that farmers and ranchers will have a new tool in the toolbox." National Corn Growers Association President Chip Bowling described the regulations as "common-sense" and said they will "create a culture of safety and responsibility, while ensuring farmers have the access, tools, and training to take full advantage of UAS technology." Some other requirements in the rule: Drones cannot operate over people unless they are in a covered structure or parked car. Operators can only control one drone at a time. Operations from a moving vehicle are not permitted unless over a "sparsely populated area." The drone may carry cargo so long as it is properly secured, does not adversely affect flight, and does not cause the total weight to top 55 pounds. However, commercial delivery for companies such as Amazon was not addressed in this rule, and no timetable was given for when that may happen. The rule does not address the privacy issues that could be brought about by drone use, but encourages the operator to refer to state and local laws. The rule takes effect in 60 days. Source: AgriMarketing
National
Cheese stocks hit record in May
High production levels and increased international competition continued to push U.S. cheese stocks to record levels for?another straight month. At the end of May, the USDA says cheese stocks, at 1.2 billion pounds, were up 12 percent on the year and the highest total for that month since 1917. Butter came out at almost 325 million pounds, a 23 percent year to year jump, also on rising production levels. May?s dairy production numbers are out July 6th. ? The post Cheese stocks hit record in May appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
Some Missouri livestock bills signed into law
Some cattle friendly bills have been signed into law by Governor Nixon but other priorities of the Missouri Cattlemen?s Association have not. The association?s Mike Deering says a tax credit bill for agriculture, including renewable energy and crops, was signed today at the Missouri State Fairgrounds, ?Ours, of course, a Qualified Beef tax credit, is something that has been very under-utilized. Producers have not been taking advantage of that. So, some changes have been made that, hopefully, will allow people to take advantage of it and more opportunities to use those dollars and grow those operations here in the state of Missouri, beef cattle farms.? The other one signed by the governor reduces red tape for family farm and ranch corporations who must register with the Missouri Secretary of State?s office?.It keeps them from having to re-register every year, ?If the name of that farm doesn?t change, if the ownership doesn?t change ? if nothing changes ? it just eliminates the bureaucracy and red tape that family farmers have to go through and allows them to be out in the field or out in the pasture instead of behind a computer having to re-file paperwork every single year.? Missouri Cattlemen?s is disappointed that Nixon did not sign the livestock liability bill that protects producers if their livestock escape their confines, the bill that would stop the government from considering disaster assistance as taxable, and the one that protects producer privacy. ? The post Some Missouri livestock bills signed into law appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
Packer inquiry on cattle light
The June 1 cattle on feed report appears to be neutral, fitting almost perfectly with pre-report estimates. On feed numbers up 2%, placements in May 10% more, and May marketing?s up 5%. Packer inquiry into the cattle remained very light on Friday afternoon with just a few scattered sales reported in parts of the North at 188.00 to 189.00 dressed, and 116.00 live. More action was expected into the late afternoon. Asking prices for cattle remaining on the showlists are around 118.00 in the South and 190.00 to 192.00 in the North. The weekly kill was estimated at 608,000 head, 1,000 more than the previous week, and 49,000 greater than 2015. Boxed beef cutout values ended weak to lower on light to moderate demand and moderate offerings. Choice beef was down 1.60 at 213.86, and select was .51 lower at 197.83. Chicago Mercantile Exchange live cattle contracts settled 112 to 297 points lower following the direction of outside markets as triple digit losses continued across the complex. Concern about how global economics will react over the coming weeks and months to the United Kingdom leaving the EU and also the availability of money in commodity markets kept everyone unwilling to buy. Feeder cattle settled 92 to 292 points lower. Feeder cattle futures were under sharp pressure following the lack of support in outside markets. Even though prices bounced off early lows, the lack of support in the market was evident. Missouri feeder cattle auctions had receipts of 27,550 cattle this week. Compared to the previous week, feeder steers and heifers sold 5.00 to 10.00 lower with some local barns reporting instances of 15.00 to as much as 20.00 lower. The supply of feeders was moderate, even with the high heat some special sales of good high quality cattle were sold. Feeder steers medium and large 1 averaging 622 pounds traded at 149.59 per hundredweight. 620 pound heifers brought 138.72. Lean hogs settled 22 to 110 points lower. Activity was extremely light with prices moving very little through much of the session. The overall lack of direction through the hog market in front month futures kept losses narrow. Deferred futures were more heavily impacted by outside market pressure. Barrows and gilts in the Iowa/Minnesota direct trade closed .58 lower at 82.03 weighted average on a carcass basis, the west was down .60 at 81.89, and nationally the market was .30 lower at 81.00. Missouri direct base carcass meat price was steady from 68.00 to 74.00. Midwest hogs on a live basis closed steady from 49.00 to 60.00. The pork carcass cutout values were .36 higher at 89.27 FOB plant. Ribs and bellies up the most. The nations hog inventory was up 1.8 percent at the start of June according to Friday?s quarterly hogs and pigs report. The breeding herd is up 0.9 percent, and market hog inventory was up 1.9 percent compared to a year ago. This is the largest June 1 hog inventory of record. The weekly hog kill was estimated at 2,103,000 head 57,000 less than last week, and down 38,000 from last year. The post Packer inquiry on cattle light appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
Red meat stocks down, poultry and vegetables up
The USDA says red meat stocks at the end of May 2016 were down five percent on the year at 1.1 billion pounds, with good consumer and export demand and at least some recent decline in slaughter rates. Pork came out at almost 613 million pounds, six percent less than last year, and beef was pegged at nearly 447 million pounds, six percent lower. Rising production levels sent poultry stocks to almost 1.3 billion pounds, seven percent above a year ago, with chicken up nine percent and turkey three percent higher. Frozen vegetable stocks at almost 1.8 billion pounds were nine percent higher than last year and the highest at the end of May since the data was first recorded in 1962. ? The post Red meat stocks down, poultry and vegetables up appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: June 24, 2016
Jul. corn closed at $3.84 and 1/2,?down 2 and 3/4?cents Jul. soybeans closed at $11.03,?down 21 and 1/2?cents Jul. soybean meal closed at $375.60,?down $7.60 Jul. soybean oil closed at 30.99,?down 76?points Jul. wheat closed at $4.54 and 3/4,?up 1/2?cent Jun. live cattle closed at $114.70,?down $2.05 Jul.?lean hogs closed at $84.05,?down 22?cents Jul. crude oil closed at $48.85,?down 52 cents Jul. cotton closed at 64.50,?down 38 points Jul. rice closed at $10.76,?down?1/2?cent Jul. Class III milk closed at $14.84,?down 2?cents Aug. gold closed at $1,320.80,?up?$57.70 Dow Jones Industrial Average: 17,399.86,?down 611.21?points The post Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: June 24, 2016 appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
Senators urge EPA to raise RFS volumes
A bipartisan group of more than three dozen US Senators has urged the EPA to raise final blending targets under the Renewable Fuel Standard for 2017. Growth Energy says the letter to the EPA outlines the need to keep progress in biofuels production ?intact? and urges the agency to put the RFS program back on track ?with blending targets that match? the levels Congress intended. Growth Energy say the RFS is America?s ?most successful energy policy? and EPA must set the final RVO volumes to 15-Billion gallons. The public comment period is underway. ? The post Senators urge EPA to raise RFS volumes appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
Combining innovation and technology on the farm
A northwestern Indiana farm family is taking an innovative approach to managing the challenging soils on their farm. Cody Styck farms with is family just a mile east of the Illinois border. He tells Brownfield managing their farm?s sandy soils requires a mix of old school practices and new technology.? ?We?ve recently decided to diversify our operation by the use of cover crops,? he says.? ?We?re focusing on the future rather than now and also by intensifying the acres we have with the use of irrigation.? Styck Family Farms was one of the farms featured on this year?s Purdue Farm Management Tour. He says farming the way they?ve always farmed ? was no longer working for them.? ?I decided to do a lot of research and it?s really helped me out to establish a good conservation plan for our acres that are less profitable,? he says.? ?And I think it?s helping us become more profitable.? Styck says he hopes other farmers participating in the tour are able to pick up a few new ideas to implement on their farms. AUDIO: Cody Styck http://cdn.brownfieldagnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/StyckCody_PurdueFarmMgmt.mp3 The post Combining innovation and technology on the farm appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
It?s time for a congressional ?time out?
Commentary. There?s nothing that communicates to the world the dignity of the U.S. House of Representatives like a and one-party sit-in on the House floor, in violation of chamber rules, cat-calling the Speaker and broadcasting these playground antics from various and sundry member cellphones. The scenario just described played out this week when House Speaker Paul Ryan (R, WI) refused to bring up for House floor votes two gun control bills rejected earlier in the week by the Senate. The Democrats, outraged at Ryan?s action, began chanting and picture/sign waving, demanding a vote on the two bills, introduced in the wake of the Orlando shootings last week.? The ?demonstration? reached such a pitch that Ryan party-line voted several minor bills and recessed the chamber until after the July 4 recess.? Several Democrats refused to leave the floor, spending in total 26 hours protesting the Speaker?s disregard for their demands. Make no mistake about it, both sides of the aisle are guilty of election-year political grandstanding, shamelessly exploiting a tragedy for political gain.? Democrats wanted to force votes on the emotional, devisive gun control issue knowing full well those votes would fail.? This would allow them to go home and campaign against GOP opponents using the anti-gun control vote as a hammer.?? The Republicans, while justified in not allowing such school yard antics to rule the day and fully aware of the Democrat maneuver, could have insisted the Democrats use regular order to bring up the bills, but instead ignored them and reaped the whirlwind. I don?t pretend to understand why Congress cannot get its collective head around common sense solutions to illegal gun use without jeopardizing Second Amendment rights and sending the National Rifle Assn. (NRA) into paroxysms of paranoia. I also cannot get my head around a Congress which continues to almost intentionally go out of its way to justify a less than 15% approval rating by the American public. I don?t understand why pro-gun control advocates approach the issue as an all-or-nothing endeavor; likewise I don?t understand why those opposed to federal gun control preach ?slippery slope? and always check the ?nothing? box. I agree with Speaker Ryan and his desire that his chamber ? for the time being ? play even these political games by the rules, not by mob rule. I also believe in the preservation of due process which some House members seem to have decided is an expendable commodity. What I do not agree with is either party deciding to ignore the rules and pound their little fists until they get their way. Whether it?s arch-conservative GOP members and their spending tirades and threats of shutting the government down or ultra-liberals and their blissful ignorance of the price of debt in pursuit of a government-will-take-care-of-you philosophy, the middle ground is the turf we should seek to occupy. This week?s episode in the House can only be described as embarrassing. Think November 8 and ballot boxes.? We don?t tolerate such behavior in our children, why do we tolerate it from members of Congress? The post It?s time for a congressional ?time out? appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
Midday cash livestock markets
Cattle country is quiet, with a few scattered bids at 116.00 live and 186.00 to 188.00 dressed, following a light to moderate trade on Wednesday and Thursday. There are reports the Southern trade may be essentially complete for the week unless higher bids surface today. Asking prices on cattle left on the showlists are around 118.00 in the South, and 192.00 plus in the North. The cattle on feed report is due out this afternoon at two-o-clock CDT. Pre-report estimates are, on feed numbers will be up two percent, placements ten percent higher, and marketing?s up five percent. Boxed beef cutout values are mixed in the morning report. Choice beef is down 1.46 at 214.00, and select is .04 higher at 198.38 Valentine, Nebraska Livestock Auction had receipts of 3140 feeder cattle on Thursday. There has not been a recent test of the market for a price comparison. The demand was moderate to good with several buyers in the seats. Nearly 86 percent of the run weighed over 600 pounds. Feeder steers medium and large 1 averaging 788 pounds traded at 153.49 per hundredweight. 667 pound heifers averaged 150.12. Weather allowed for most producers in Missouri to continue making hay this week. A pretty good storm line popped up in Northern Missouri this week and dropped 4-6 inches of rain, but most areas remain dry. With nearly 60 percent of the state showing up on the latest drought monitor. The supply of hay is moderate to heavy, demand is light and prices are steady. Supreme quality alfalfa from $180.00 TO 200.00 A TON. Good quality ranged from 150.00 to 190.00. Good quality mixed grass hay at 75.00 to 125.00. Barrows and gilts in the Iowa/Minnesota direct trade and the West are not reported due to confidentiality. Nationally the hog market is down 1.03 at 80.27 weighted average on a carcass basis. Missouri direct base carcass meat price is steady from 68.00 to 74.00. Midwest hogs on a live basis are steady from 49.00 to 60.00. The pork carcass cutout value is unchanged from yesterday at 88.91 FOB plant. Many analysts call for the pork cutout value to move to or above the $90.00 level in the coming weeks, with the belly complex likely to be the major driver as we move into the heart of the BLT season, according to John Harrington at DTN. The post Midday cash livestock markets appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
Yield-robbing disease threats
A plant pathologist says areas receiving excess moisture will probably see increased disease pressure this summer. Dr. Dean Malvick with the University of Minnesota tells Brownfield Sudden Death Syndrome (SDS) is already a threat in wet soybean fields. ?That disease is favored by wet soils early in the season, as we?ve seen in some places already.? But we also need?wet, or at least?moist conditions generally through the first part of August.? ?Phytophthora root rot is another common disease in saturated soils. ?That is something we?ve already heard some reports of in certain places.? That?s another fungal-type disease that infects the roots and starts going up the stem causing brown discoloration.? And that is a disease I expect we?ll be seeing more of this year than we have in other years.? ?As the growing season progresses, Malvick says diseases like white mold and brown stem rot will join the list of soil-borne bacteria that thrive in soggy conditions and inhibit yield. ? http://cdn.brownfieldagnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Dean-Malvick-6-23-16.mp3? ? ? ? ? ? The post Yield-robbing disease threats appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
FSA county election nominations open
The Farm Service Agency county committee election nominations are open now through August 1st. State Executive Director for Michigan Christine White tells Brownfield county committee members are an essential link between the agricultural community and the U.S. Department of Agriculture.???They are the ones that are able to tell us what crop conditions are throughout the country, they can keep us apprised of damaging weather, and they can provide information up through the state committee to Washington on aspects of a program that may not work the best for producers in their area.? White says committee members serve three year terms and must be enrolled in a FSA program to be eligible.???Our latest reports indicate that we have an increase in women and minorities as well as beginning farmers participating in the elections and we want that to grow.? White says nomination forms are available at FSA services centers or online. AUDIO: Interview with Christine White? http://cdn.brownfieldagnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/160623_MIFSAElections.mp3 The post FSA county election nominations open appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
USFRA?s seeking ?Faces of Farming? applicants
Illinois farmer Thomas Titus is one of USFRA?s Faces of Farming & Ranching?and he says it has been a way to highlight the up and coming generation of producers, ?We have three generations actively involved on our farm each and every day. Whenever the kids get off the bus, or like they are on summer break now, the fourth generation?s out there helping with us. And, they might only be four but they?re a big piece. I mean, that?s why we do what we do and that?s why it?s important to share our story and talk about what we?re doing on our farms.? And, Titus says, it?s been a great way to connect with consumers, ?It?s been a great experience for me, and I mean, what this provides is an opportunity to speak to more consumer facing events about what we?re doing on our farms. And, it puts a real face back to agriculture and shines a light, in part, personalities and values that are behind today?s food.? His family farm is in Elkhart, Illinois, where they raise hogs, beef cattle, goats and chickens. To apply to become one of the Faces of Farming, go to click here.? Applications will be taken through July 10th, 2016. ? The post USFRA’s seeking ‘Faces of Farming’ applicants appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
Michigan ag in favor of GMO labeling resolution
Michigan agricultural groups are in favor of the Senate Agriculture Committee?s proposed GMO labeling legislation. John Kran with Michigan Farm Bureau tells Brownfield the week after the 4th of July might be the earliest the U.S. House of Representatives could take up the measure.? ?I do understand there is some wiggle room with the Vermont law, in terms of when fines would be levied against companies that have not complied, but there?s not a lot of time there.? He says as the bill is written, USDA will be tasked with writing what the final GMO label will look like.???A study on the Vermont law in particular, would raise food prices by over $1,000 per family in Vermont alone.?? He says, ?We want to make sure whatever is done is in the best interest of consumers, keeps technologies available for farmers and gives people the correct information.? Michigan Agri-Business Association President Jim Byrum says the measure creates a common-sense system that will expand information for consumers about the food they buy, while avoiding burdensome and costly hurdles for food producers. Michigan Corn Growers Association Executive Director Jim Zook says the legislation will prevent a state-by-state patchwork of laws that would raise food prices for consumers and hurt Michigan businesses. Michigan Soybean Association President Dave Williams says Michigan soybean farmers absolutely support this bill and they?re calling on the Senate to pass it as soon as possible. AUDIO: Interview with John Kran? http://cdn.brownfieldagnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/160623_MFB-GMO.mp3 The post Michigan ag in favor of GMO labeling resolution appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
Brexit vote has markets on edge
A commodity broker says the UK?s vote yesterday to exit the European Union jolted the global market place. Pete Manhart owner of Illinois based Bates Commodities says it?s been a wild day in the financials and that has carried over into the rest of the markets including commodities.? ?Beans at one time were down 26, right now we?re down 12 to 15,? he says.? ?Corn was down 10 to 12, right now we?re down 3 to 4.? Manhart tells Brownfield commodity prices have dropped like a rock this week and yesterday?s vote added even more pressure to the market.? ?It did have a big, huge jolt to the world, we?ll just have to see how long it lasts,? he says.? ?But in the background the main thing that has pushed prices down is good weather forecasts for the next couple of weeks.? The value of the British pound has also dropped, boosting the US dollar and Manhart says that makes US commodities even more expensive. AUDIO: Pete Manhart, Bates Commodities http://cdn.brownfieldagnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/ManhartPete.mp3 The post Brexit vote has markets on edge appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
Sit-in could stand in way of national GMO label
The ranking member of the House Ag Committee says a Democratic sit in protesting guns might stand in the way of?a national GMO labeling standard. Congressman Collin Peterson of Minnesota tells Brownfield the outcome of the sit in could be that nothing gets done in the House the remainder of the year. ?The other problem we?ve got is the Freedom Caucus and those kind of people in the House who will be against the Senate bill I?m sure.? They are the group that took (former House Speaker) Boehner out because he was working with Democrats.? He says there will be pressure on House Speaker Paul Ryan to avoid bringing up the Senate?s GMO labeling bill because of partisan politics. ?And the people that will be against the bill on our side of the aisle are a lot of the same people that were protesting the gun situation.? So in this climate, how you would be able to get enough Republicans and Democrats to support something is problematic.? Peterson says he?s not ready to make a decision on the Senate?s GMO labeling legislation. ?I still think that the House proposal that we passed is a better response.? But it looks like what the Senate?s come up with is something that most people can live with.? But I?m trying to figure out some final details.? One Senate provision that Peterson agrees with is the exemption of new genetic engineering techniques like gene editing from being labeled biotech. And while Vermont?s GMO labeling law is scheduled to go into effect July 1st, Peterson does not expect the state to enforce it right away. ? http://cdn.brownfieldagnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/Collin-Peterson-6-24-16.mp3? ? ? ? The post Sit-in could stand in way of national GMO label appeared first on http://brownfieldagnews.com.      
World
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GET ME OUT!
With the British majority voting to leave the European Union, world markets are adjusting to extreme changes in asset values across many sectors. It looks like now that the Brits will have their cake, they will be eating it too with the Pound hitting a 30 year low. The official date of the departure is yet to be determined, but asset managers are clearly placing their bets and moving large amounts of capital around. The ?get me out? mentality took many stocks and commodities sharply lower on the
Could Brexit Kill the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership?
This week Britain decided to leave the European Union (EU) in a historical vote nicknamed Brexit that is leaving trade casualties in its wake.
Viewers Respond to John's Political Commentary
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Danke, Cows!
Following Brexit: The Future of Crop Protection and GMOs in the EU
The headlines and commentaries can be a little scary: “Brexit Could Trigger the Breakup of the United Kingdom” “More Countries to Leave” “Markets Fall, Europe Worries, Who will Lead UK?” The long-term?implications of the?United Kingdom’s decision to leave the EU will have to wait. The short-term effects are already sending reverberations through stock markets around the world. There is talk by some right-wing groups in France and the Netherlands about their own referendums to leave the block of countries formed after World War II. What’s also unclear is what impact the decision will have on crop protection and ag technology. AgriBusiness Global reached out to the European Crop Protection Association, which represents?the crop protection industry in Europe, and EuropBio, which promotes an innovative and dynamic environment?for the biotech industry in Europe, to get their thoughts on Brexit. From the European Crop Protection Association: We are hugely disappointed, but not altogether surprised, that the UK has decided to leave the EU; Glyphosate is an example from our sector that epitomizes how dysfunctional the EU system can be.? A system where a few? Member States, driven by politics rather than science, are allowed to potentially prevent the authorization of a substance that allows the production of a plentiful, safe, sustainable and affordable supply of food for the European population, while allowing farmers to stay competitive and make positive contributions to the environment such as practicing no-till; The UK could be consistently relied upon to champion the causes of innovation in agriculture, a science based approach to decision making, and better and smarter regulation within the EU. Their voice will be missed, but we hope future relations with the EU will ensure that this dialogue on innovation and science continues and improves; We hope that the institutions will take time to reflect on the reasons that one of the largest and most influential Member States would choose to leave, and how it can address some of the issues raised during the debate such as the real concern about the unnecessary red tape and burden that Brussels places on businesses. From EuropaBio: While respecting the decision of British voters, EuropaBio and its members are deeply concerned with the?result of the UK referendum to leave the European Union. As witnessed since this result became clear, we?are entering a period of uncertainty and unpredictability for the EU economic and political system that may?have effects both on the biotech industry in Europe, and on the broader European business community. The biotechnology industry is a highly innovative, resilient and increasingly global community, geared?towards responding to our major societal challenges. EuropaBio and the UK?s BioIndustry Association (the?UK national member association) will work together to make specific expertise available to EU and UK?policymakers and key stakeholders in the coming weeks and months. The priority for our industry is that?once the decision to leave the EU is confirmed, the negotiation period is completed with a focused eye on?limiting detrimental effects on the competitiveness and regulatory ecosystem of the biotech industry and?of innovation on both sides of the Channel. As a European industry association, EuropaBio is also concerned about any knock-on effect on the focus on?European competitiveness and on the unity of the European Union as a whole. In the context of calls for?similar referendums and upcoming national elections in a number of European Member States, we would?like to reiterate the positive value of European unity in terms of economy, political stability,?competitiveness and integration. It is fundamental that European and national policymakers continue to?focus on supporting and enhancing Europe?s growth, generating jobs and creating a positive climate for?investment, research and development in which Europe?s leading industries, including the biotech industry,?can continue to operate successfully. From EuropaBio — the impact on GMOs: The UK has consistently supported science-based decision making and as such as consistently voted in favor of GMOs positively assessed by EFSA for import into the EU. (See here for voting behavior of other Member States). EuropaBio?does not foresee a major impact of a decision of the UK to leave the EU on GMO imports into the EU, nor on (the minimal) GMO cultivation in the EU in the foreseeable future. More farmers are now planting GMOs globally than all EU farmers put together. on a surface that is larger than the EU?s entire arable land. In the EU, there is currently only one GMO approved for cultivation and there are a number of non-science-based national bans on the cultivation of that one crop. EU cultivation of GMO crops currently corresponds to the surface of a large city.
Pro Farmer: Wind Comes Out of Bulls' Sailes
In five days, December corn futures retraced more than 75% of their strong two-and-a-half month rally.
China?s Top 10 Pesticide Companies in 2016
By CCM     The total combined revenue of China’s top 10 pesticide companies reached $4.634 billion in 2016, down 8% from a year ago. Of the top 10, five posted lower revenues, four had higher revenues and the remaining company was a newcomer to the list. In 2016, the top three companies were the same as in 2015, but ranked differently. Nanjing Redsun Co., Ltd. climbed to the top from No. 3 with revenue of $569 million, down by 1.47%, followed by Zhejiang Wynca Chemical Group Co., Ltd. (Zhejiang Wynca, $546 million, down by 11.86% YoY) and Nutrichem Co., Ltd. ($535 million, down by 12.06% YoY). Zhejiang Wynca?s decreasing revenue in 2015 was mainly due to the low glyphosate price. Many domestic pesticide companies that were engaged in glyphosate production suffered a significant decline in revenue, such as Fuhua Tongda Agro-chemical Technology Co., Ltd., Jiangsu Good Harvest-Weien Agrochemical Co., Ltd., Zhejiang Wynca, Hubei Sanonda Co., Ltd., and Shandong Weifang Rainbow Chemical Co., Ltd. However, Jiangsu Yangnong Chemical Co., Ltd. also produced mainly glyphosate, but losses from that business in 2015 were offset by revenue from its insecticide business and income from new projects of its subsidiary, Jiangsu Youjia Crop Protection Co., Ltd. The newcomer, Sinochem Agro, which ranked 15th on last year’s list, and Sinochem Crop Protection Co., Ltd. (Sinochem Crop Protection), are both subsidiaries of Sinochem International Corporation. After its business integration in 2015, Sinochem Crop Protection became the controlling shareholder of Sinochem Agro and ranked 8th this year with revenue of $422 million. The domestic pesticide market grew slower than in previous years in China. Combined total revenue of the 829 pesticide enterprises with annual revenue of over RMB 20 million from their main business operations hit $49.90 billion, with a YoY growth rate of 1.88%. According to Phillips McDougall, a crop protection research company, the total revenue of the global pesticide industry in 2015 reached $58.18 billion, down by 8% YoY. During 2011-2015, output of herbicide technical took up roughly 50% of the total pesticide technical output every year in China. However,? low herbicide prices in 2015 — especially for glyphosate and paraquat — had a huge impact on China?s pesticide industry. Under these circumstances, some companies, including Jiangsu Huifeng Agrochemical Co., Ltd., managed to increase revenue thanks to their balanced product structure and innovative marketing methods. In general, performance of China?s pesticide industry in 2015 was worse than that of previous years, but many domestic manufacturers were still be able to achieve progress. Predicting the ranking list in 2017, Li Biyan, agrichemical researcher of CCM, stated that: ?It is not likely that these 10 pesticide enterprises would edge out of the ranking list as they are all leading pesticide enterprises in China.?   For more information about CCM, please visit?www.cnchemicals.com?or get in touch with us directly by emailing?econtact@cnchemicals.com?or calling +86-20-37616606. Also see CCM’s newly published report: 2016 Top 100 Pesticide Enterprises in China. ?  
Commodity Markets React Negatively to 'Brexit'
LimelightPlayerUtil.initEmbed('limelight_player_884675'); Corn is down 3 to 4 cents, with soybeans down double-digits. Wheat is 3 to 6 cents lower. Cattle are sharply lower and hogs are slightly to moderately lower.
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Colorado Farmer Shatters Hemp's Fiber Ceiling
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BASF, Kingenta Partner to Bring Fertilizer to Chinese Growers
BASF and Kingenta, a Chinese fertilizer supplier, will partner to bring growers in China fertilizers coated with BASF?s new Limus?technology, which was designed to limit?the loss of nitrogen in urea-based fertilizers. In this partnership, BASF will provide Kingenta with its Limus?technology. Kingenta, one of the largest fertilizer suppliers in China, will directly promote and sell Limus-treated fertilizers in China beginning?July 2016. ?With this powerful collaboration, we combine a fantastic product with high-end expertise in the Chinese fertilizer market,? says Mark Shillingford, Head of Marketing BASF Crop Protection China Limited. ?BASF and Kingenta have jointly developed a solution to one of the most important challenges in agriculture,? concludes Shillingford. ?BASF has invested significantly into R&D to solve drawbacks of generic urease inhibitors. Limus?has an outstanding biological performance through two active ingredients and a longer shelf life due to BASF?s polymer technology used in its formulation. That?s why it is the best urea protection for optimal plant nutrition,? says Dr. Markus Schmid, Director Global Limus?launch, BASF Crop Protection. More on the BASF, Kingenta partnership.
Morning Audio 6/24/16
Kansas Wheat Farmers Continue to be Impressed
Temperatures show no sign of relenting and rain has little chance of preventing yield monitors from giving farmers chills, states the Kansas Wheat Harvest Report.