@C - CORN - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Sep '17 393'2 380'4 391'0 8'4
Dec '17 406'6 394'4 404'6 8'4
Mar '18 417'0 405'2 415'2 8'2
May '18 421'4 410'4 420'0 7'6
Jul '18 425'6 415'2 424'4 7'4
Sep '18 424'2 415'6 423'2 6'4
@S - SOYBEANS - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Aug '17 1017'2 995'0 1013'2 13'4
Sep '17 1022'2 999'4 1018'2 14'2
Nov '17 1031'2 1008'2 1027'0 14'4
Jan '18 1039'4 1016'6 1035'4 14'4
Mar '18 1040'2 1018'4 1036'2 13'2
May '18 1042'6 1022'2 1038'6 13'0
Jul '18 1049'0 1029'0 1044'6 12'6
@K - HARD RED WINTER WHEAT - KCBT
Month High Low Last Chg
Sep '17 506'4 493'6 503'6 3'4
Dec '17 532'6 520'0 530'2 3'4
Mar '18 549'4 537'0 547'2 3'6
May '18 561'4 551'0 560'2 3'6
@L - LIVE CATTLE - CME
Month High Low Last Chg
Aug '17 118.200 115.700 115.875 -1.400
Oct '17 119.100 116.975 117.075 -1.800
@C - COTTON #2 - ICEFU
Month High Low Last Chg
Oct '17 69.77 69.37 69.37 0.61
Dec '17 69.25 68.10 69.00 0.89
Mar '18 68.77 67.92 68.64 0.84
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Local
Seed Costs for Corn in 2017 and 2018
Per acre seed costs for corn likely will not significantly decrease until corn acres decline. Seed companies have little incentive to reduce prices under stable or growing acreages. In 2017, world corn acreage declines do not suggest large decreases in 2017 per acre seed costs. In recent years, farmers have shown a reluctance to switch from corn to other crops. At this point, the economic situation looks much the same for 2018 as it did for 2017, suggesting that corn acreages will not decrease, resulting in stable per acre seed costs into 2018. Per Acre Seed Costs from 1990 to 2016 Figure 1 shows per acre seed costs for corn from two sources: FBFM, central Illinois, high-productivity farmland - This data is summarized from grain farms enrolled in Illinois Farm Business Farm Management (FBFM). Figure 1 shows per acre seed costs for central Illinois farms having high-productivity farmland. USDA, US - This data comes from the Economic Reporting Service (ERS), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. While the data come from different sources, the series follow each other closely. The correlation coefficient between the two series is .99. As discussed in an earlier farmdoc daily article, seed costs increased dramatically from 2006 through 2014, a period of rising and high corn prices. In central Illinois, seed costs rose from $45 per acre in 2006 to $120 per acre in 2014. From 2006 to 2014, seed costs increased an average of 11% per year, much higher than the rates for fertilizers and pesticides (farmdoc daily, July 12, 2016?). Since 2014, per acre seed costs decreased slightly. In central Illinois, seed costs were $120 per acre in 2014 and $118 per acre in 2015 and 2016. From 2014 to 2015, seed costs in central Illinois decreased $2 per acre, a decrease of 2%. According to ERS, US costs decreased from $102 per acre in 2015 to $99 per acre in 2016, a decrease of $3 per acre. Seed Costs Relationship to Corn Acres in the World An extremely strong relationship exists between per acre seed costs and harvested corn acres in the world (see Figure 2). Between 1990 and 2016, seed costs per acre increased as corn acres in the world increased. A simple linear regression was used to explain seed costs in central Illinois per acre was explained by world corn acres. This regression explains 95% of the variability in seed costs between 1990 and 2016. Adding other explanatory variables - such as corn price, expected corn yield, or time - do not add to the explanatory power of the relationship. The economic intuitions behind this relationship are straightforward. Corn acre increases usually are associated with increases in the profitability of corn relative to other crops. Because of profitability increases, farmers have additional funds for making seed purchases. Seed companies then are presented opportunities to increase both the quantity of seed sold due to increases in demand, but also can increase seed prices because farmers in the position to pay for the higher seed prices. An environment where world corn acreages are decreasing could produce the opposite dynamic. The total size of the seed market would decrease. Seed companies then may have an incentive to lower seed prices in the hopes that price decreases stem some of the movement away from corn acres. While prices may decline given lower corn acres, there is little data to support this contention. There have been no extended periods of corn acreage decreases since 1990. Corn acres increased in 16 out of the 27 years between 1990 and 2017 (see Figure 2). When they did occur, declines were modest. Therefore, suggesting the impacts of corn acreage decreases on seed prices is speculative. Seed Company Profitability and Strategies Merger activities of seed technology companies have received a great deal in recent months. If all proposed mergers pass regulatory reviews, the "Big Six" agricultural technology companies will be reduced to four companies (see James McDonald, Choices). Corn acreage changes likely play a role in these merger activities. Seed companies experienced rapid growth in revenue from 2006 through 2014. Not only did seed quantities increase because of increasing corn acres, but the prices on seeds were increasing as well. Both price and quantity increases resulted in growing revenue. The large seed companies are publicly traded. In general, investors desire prospects of continuing growth in revenue and income. Publicly traded companies with high prospects of growth have higher stock prices than those companies with lower growth prospects. Hence, there is an incentive for a company's management to seek growth. Rather than being in an environment of growing acres, seed companies now face an environment of relatively stable corn acres. When faced with a stable environment, a strategy for seeking growth is to increase market share. One way to increase market share would be to decrease seed corn prices. Reducing seed price would make that seed company's product more attractive to farmers relative to other companies' seeds. However, the other seed companies likely would lower seed prices in response to the first seed company lower prices. Corn acres may not change because of seed price changes. After several companies lower their prices, all seed companies could face lower revenue because seed prices have come down while the quantity of seed sold has not increased. Compared to price decreases, seeking mergers could be viewed by management as an attractive way for seeking growth. The merged company could have the potential to develop new technologies that combine the two companies' strengths. The resulting new technologies could offer farmer additional value opportunities for which those farmers would be willing to pay a higher price, resulting in revenue growth to the merged company. Seed Costs in 2017 and 2018 Recent history of seed corn and acreage changes, along with seed company motives, suggests that per acre seed costs should not be expected to decrease until corn acreage decreases in the world occur. According to the Foreign Agricultural Service, corn acres harvested will be down by 1% in 2017, but will still be the second highest acreage in recent history (see Figure 2). The 2017 world acre figure does not result in a large decrease in seed costs. Farmers have shown a reluctance to switch away from corn to other crops. In Illinois, soybeans have been more profitable than corn since 2013 (farmdoc daily, July 7, 2016). Even given these profitability differences, shifts from corn to soybeans have been relatively modest. At this point, the economic situation for 2018 likely will be much the same as in 2017, suggesting the same plantings as in 2017. As a result, per acre seed costs in 2018 likely will be like those in 2017. References MacDonald, J. "Mergers and Competition in Seed and Agricultural Chemical Markets." Amber News, USDA Economic Research Service, April 03, 2017. https://www.ers.usda.gov/amber-waves/2017/april/mergers-and-competition-in-seed-and-agricultural-chemical-markets/ Schnitkey, G., and S. Sellars. "Growth Rates of Fertilizer, Pesticide, and Seed Costs over Time." farmdoc daily (6):130, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, July 12, 2016. Schnitkey, G. "Consider Planting Less Corn and More Soybeans in 2017." farmdoc daily (6):127, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, July 7, 2016. Schnitkey, G. "Corn Seed Costs from 1995 to 2014." farmdoc daily (5):214, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, November 17, 2015. Source: Gary Schnitkey, Farmdocdaily
National
Appropriations amendment expands H-2A program
The House Appropriations Committee has approved an amendment that extends the H-2A guest worker visa program to all of agriculture. Introduced by Congressman Dan Newhouse of Washington, the amendment was approved as part of the Fiscal Year 2018 Homeland Security Appropriations Act and provides dairy, livestock and other agricultural sectors access to the program. The H-2A program would remain a temporary source of ag labor and there are still time limits for how low workers can stay in the U.S. Continue reading Appropriations amendment expands H-2A program at Brownfield Ag News.      
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Weather and exports are the main drivers of this morning?s higher ...
Weather and exports are the main drivers of this morning?s higher trade action. Weekly export sales for corn were almost 2 times better than last week. Beans were up 80% from last week. All wheat was up 87% from LW. Traders will be watching for confirmation of needed rainfall across Western Iowa. Tomorrows Cattle on Feed report is expected to show July 1 at 102.9%, June placements at 106.1% and June Marketings at 104.7%. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn +5 to +6, Soybeans +7 to +8, KC Wheat 2 lower. Crude oil +.40c/brl.>
Southern Rust has been confirmed in Cass, Fillmore and York counties ...
Southern Rust has been confirmed in Cass, Fillmore and York counties in Nebraska.>
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Josh Dexter from Wood River talks about the different pests he is ...
Josh Dexter from Wood River talks about the different pests he is seeing in the fields and what farmer-owners can do to curb any more yield damage. #YourYieldTour #YourYieldsMatter #YourYieldsYourFields>
Southern rust has been confirmed by @UNLPlantClinic in eastern ...
Southern rust has been confirmed by @UNLPlantClinic in eastern Nebraska corn. Be on the lookout and continue to scout your fields. #YourYieldsMatter>
Dawn Caldwell, Head of Government Affairs brings you your GOVERNMENT ...
Dawn Caldwell, Head of Government Affairs brings you your GOVERNMENT AFFAIRS ? UPDATE JULY 17, 2017.>
USDA Crop Progress report for the week ending July 16, 2017.
USDA Crop Progress report for the week ending July 16, 2017.>
#KeepingItLocal
#KeepingItLocal>
Fungicide application is incredibly important during this time of the ...
Fungicide application is incredibly important during this time of the season to stop these yield robbing diseases! #YourYieldsMatter #YourYieldsYourFields>
Early weather forecasts to start the week look a bit drier, but most ...
Early weather forecasts to start the week look a bit drier, but most of Iowa is expected to see rainfall on Wednesday or Thursday of this week. Condition ratings will be out this afternoon at 3 p.m. by the USDA and most across the Corn Belt are saying the crops are looking a touch better. As pollination is well under way right now, the marketplace will be watching crop progress and weather very closely. If the expected rain mid-week doesn?t develop, the marketplace could get nervous very quickly. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn down 1 to 2, soybeans up 3 to 4, KC Wheat down 4. Crude oil off 13 cents a barrel.>
Derek Bailey out of the Harvard location stresses the importance of ...
Derek Bailey out of the Harvard location stresses the importance of fungicide after finding bacterial leaf streak in an area field. #YourYieldTour #YourYieldsMatter #YourYieldsYourFields>
"I grew up in the small town of Soldier, Kansas where we lived close ...
"I grew up in the small town of Soldier, Kansas where we lived close to my grandparents who were dairy farmers. My childhood was cluttered with activities such as music, church, horses, sports and spending time on my grandparent?s farm." Click on the link below to read more about Celie! #KeepingItLocal>
CME futures extended yesterday?s move lower overnight. Traders have ...
CME futures extended yesterday?s move lower overnight. Traders have been glued to recent weather maps and precipitation indication radars. The fresh set of USDA data released yesterday morning was viewed as neutral to negative. New crop corn production is estimated at 14.2 billion bushels. Soybean production is estimated at 4.3 billion bushels. 17/18 ending stocks for corn are pegged at 2.3 billion bushels and beans at 460 million bushels. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn down 7, Soybeans down 23, KC Wheat down 13.>
Soybeans on the right are treated with our product Realize ...
Soybeans on the right are treated with our product Realize #YourYieldsMatter #YourYieldsYourFields>
Day 2 of the Western Area Tour our Board of Directors stopped to ...
Day 2 of the Western Area Tour our Board of Directors stopped to visit Yuma, Colorado>
Local
Seed Costs for Corn in 2017 and 2018
Per acre seed costs for corn likely will not significantly decrease until corn acres decline. Seed companies have little incentive to reduce prices under stable or growing acreages. In 2017, world corn acreage declines do not suggest large decreases in 2017 per acre seed costs. In recent years, farmers have shown a reluctance to switch from corn to other crops. At this point, the economic situation looks much the same for 2018 as it did for 2017, suggesting that corn acreages will not decrease, resulting in stable per acre seed costs into 2018. Per Acre Seed Costs from 1990 to 2016 Figure 1 shows per acre seed costs for corn from two sources: FBFM, central Illinois, high-productivity farmland - This data is summarized from grain farms enrolled in Illinois Farm Business Farm Management (FBFM). Figure 1 shows per acre seed costs for central Illinois farms having high-productivity farmland. USDA, US - This data comes from the Economic Reporting Service (ERS), an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture. While the data come from different sources, the series follow each other closely. The correlation coefficient between the two series is .99. As discussed in an earlier farmdoc daily article, seed costs increased dramatically from 2006 through 2014, a period of rising and high corn prices. In central Illinois, seed costs rose from $45 per acre in 2006 to $120 per acre in 2014. From 2006 to 2014, seed costs increased an average of 11% per year, much higher than the rates for fertilizers and pesticides (farmdoc daily, July 12, 2016?). Since 2014, per acre seed costs decreased slightly. In central Illinois, seed costs were $120 per acre in 2014 and $118 per acre in 2015 and 2016. From 2014 to 2015, seed costs in central Illinois decreased $2 per acre, a decrease of 2%. According to ERS, US costs decreased from $102 per acre in 2015 to $99 per acre in 2016, a decrease of $3 per acre. Seed Costs Relationship to Corn Acres in the World An extremely strong relationship exists between per acre seed costs and harvested corn acres in the world (see Figure 2). Between 1990 and 2016, seed costs per acre increased as corn acres in the world increased. A simple linear regression was used to explain seed costs in central Illinois per acre was explained by world corn acres. This regression explains 95% of the variability in seed costs between 1990 and 2016. Adding other explanatory variables - such as corn price, expected corn yield, or time - do not add to the explanatory power of the relationship. The economic intuitions behind this relationship are straightforward. Corn acre increases usually are associated with increases in the profitability of corn relative to other crops. Because of profitability increases, farmers have additional funds for making seed purchases. Seed companies then are presented opportunities to increase both the quantity of seed sold due to increases in demand, but also can increase seed prices because farmers in the position to pay for the higher seed prices. An environment where world corn acreages are decreasing could produce the opposite dynamic. The total size of the seed market would decrease. Seed companies then may have an incentive to lower seed prices in the hopes that price decreases stem some of the movement away from corn acres. While prices may decline given lower corn acres, there is little data to support this contention. There have been no extended periods of corn acreage decreases since 1990. Corn acres increased in 16 out of the 27 years between 1990 and 2017 (see Figure 2). When they did occur, declines were modest. Therefore, suggesting the impacts of corn acreage decreases on seed prices is speculative. Seed Company Profitability and Strategies Merger activities of seed technology companies have received a great deal in recent months. If all proposed mergers pass regulatory reviews, the "Big Six" agricultural technology companies will be reduced to four companies (see James McDonald, Choices). Corn acreage changes likely play a role in these merger activities. Seed companies experienced rapid growth in revenue from 2006 through 2014. Not only did seed quantities increase because of increasing corn acres, but the prices on seeds were increasing as well. Both price and quantity increases resulted in growing revenue. The large seed companies are publicly traded. In general, investors desire prospects of continuing growth in revenue and income. Publicly traded companies with high prospects of growth have higher stock prices than those companies with lower growth prospects. Hence, there is an incentive for a company's management to seek growth. Rather than being in an environment of growing acres, seed companies now face an environment of relatively stable corn acres. When faced with a stable environment, a strategy for seeking growth is to increase market share. One way to increase market share would be to decrease seed corn prices. Reducing seed price would make that seed company's product more attractive to farmers relative to other companies' seeds. However, the other seed companies likely would lower seed prices in response to the first seed company lower prices. Corn acres may not change because of seed price changes. After several companies lower their prices, all seed companies could face lower revenue because seed prices have come down while the quantity of seed sold has not increased. Compared to price decreases, seeking mergers could be viewed by management as an attractive way for seeking growth. The merged company could have the potential to develop new technologies that combine the two companies' strengths. The resulting new technologies could offer farmer additional value opportunities for which those farmers would be willing to pay a higher price, resulting in revenue growth to the merged company. Seed Costs in 2017 and 2018 Recent history of seed corn and acreage changes, along with seed company motives, suggests that per acre seed costs should not be expected to decrease until corn acreage decreases in the world occur. According to the Foreign Agricultural Service, corn acres harvested will be down by 1% in 2017, but will still be the second highest acreage in recent history (see Figure 2). The 2017 world acre figure does not result in a large decrease in seed costs. Farmers have shown a reluctance to switch away from corn to other crops. In Illinois, soybeans have been more profitable than corn since 2013 (farmdoc daily, July 7, 2016). Even given these profitability differences, shifts from corn to soybeans have been relatively modest. At this point, the economic situation for 2018 likely will be much the same as in 2017, suggesting the same plantings as in 2017. As a result, per acre seed costs in 2018 likely will be like those in 2017. References MacDonald, J. "Mergers and Competition in Seed and Agricultural Chemical Markets." Amber News, USDA Economic Research Service, April 03, 2017. https://www.ers.usda.gov/amber-waves/2017/april/mergers-and-competition-in-seed-and-agricultural-chemical-markets/ Schnitkey, G., and S. Sellars. "Growth Rates of Fertilizer, Pesticide, and Seed Costs over Time." farmdoc daily (6):130, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, July 12, 2016. Schnitkey, G. "Consider Planting Less Corn and More Soybeans in 2017." farmdoc daily (6):127, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, July 7, 2016. Schnitkey, G. "Corn Seed Costs from 1995 to 2014." farmdoc daily (5):214, Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, November 17, 2015. Source: Gary Schnitkey, Farmdocdaily
True Armyworms Spotted in South Dakota Wheat
While scouting wheat last week I observed several fields with small populations of true armyworms. This may seem unimportant as most wheat fields are nearing maturity. However, true armyworms don’t just defoliate leaves. True armyworms will initially feed on leaves, but as the wheat dries down, they will begin feeding on other areas of the plant and eventually cause head clipping. True armyworm populations often will not reach economically damaging levels in wheat; however, head clipping will cause economic losses to occur rapidly. The drawback to managing true armyworms near harvest is that the insecticides available will delay harvest from 7-21 days after application. The specific pre-harvest interval for each insecticide is located on the label. Identification True armyworms can vary greatly in color from light brown to dark green or almost black (Figure 2). They can be identified based on a few distinguishing characteristics. True armyworm caterpillars have orange stripes present on the sides of their bodies (Figure 1), and a network of black lines present on their heads (Figure 3). The caterpillars have three true legs, and four pairs of prolegs that are present near the center of their bodies with a distinct black band present on each one. Scouting & Management What to look for? True armyworm caterpillar populations are often overlooked or are simply not present in wheat. True armyworm caterpillars feed at night. During the day, they are typically found near the base of the plant or in litter on the surface of the soil. When scouting for true armyworms in wheat, search for defoliation or head clipping in the field. If defoliation is observed, look for caterpillars on plants and in the soil around the injured plants. For wheat that is close to harvest, the threshold for true armyworm is 2 caterpillars that are less than ¾ inch in length per square foot. Insecticide Considerations The stage of the wheat and time until harvest should be considered prior to any insecticide application. Yield loss in wheat is more likely to occur if the flag leaf is removed prior to the soft dough stage. However, as plants mature there are fewer nutrients available and as a result caterpillars will move to the head and feed either on the beards or simply clip the heads. If populations of true armyworm caterpillars are observed in a maturing wheat field it is important to scout neighboring corn and later wheat fields as true armyworm caterpillars are known to move in large populations from one field to the next as resources are depleted. For insecticide management options please refer to the current edition of the South Dakota Pest Management Guide: Wheat. Remember to always follow label instructions and wear proper personal protective equipment when applying insecticides. Source: Adam Varenhorst, South Dakota State University Extension
Is Your Soybean Field at Risk for White Mold?
According to USDA-NASS crop progress report for the week of July 17, 49% of the soybeans in South Dakota are at flowering. The flowering growth stage is also the time when white mold infection is initiated. The white mold pathogen infects the soybeans through the flowers that are senescing after pollination. Unfortunately for this disease, by the time symptoms are seen, it is too late to apply a fungicide. Growers need to be aware of the risk factors for white mold in order to decide the need for applying a fungicide in order to prevent white mold from occurring when soybeans are at flowering. What are the risk factors for white mold? Field history. In the past, has the soybean field been infected with white mold? It is most likely that if a field has had white mold in the past, white mold will develop again. Row spacing. Are soybeans planted <20 inches row spacing? The narrower the row spacing, the higher the risk for white mold. Cultivar susceptibility. Is the planted cultivar rated moderately susceptible to susceptible for white mold? While there is no complete resistance to white mold, cultivar differences in tolerance to white mold do exist. Fertility level/yield potential. Does the field have an elevated fertility level? Has animal manure been applied this current season or past few seasons? Animal manure or excessive fertilizer tends to promote quick growth leading to early canopy closure. This increases the risk for white mold. Planting population. The higher the plant population (>150,000 seeds per acre), the faster the canopy will close and provide the microclimate for white mold to develop. Landscape/lay of the land. Does the field have a tree shelter belt or pronounced valley bottoms? Tree shelter belts tend to block air movement for soybeans close to the shelter belt. Also field bottoms tend to remain wet for longer periods of time, providing a conducive environment for white mold infection. Weather. White mold infection is favored by temperatures of 85°F or cooler and moisture whether it be from rain, fog, dew, or high relative humidity. Management For fields that have some or all of the above conditions, white mold risk may exist. Although white mold infection is driven by rainy weather and a lot of areas are relatively dry, it is important to monitor soybean growth and rainfall in the forecast. For soybeans at flowering with some of the above risk factors, especially field history and narrow row spacing, a fungicide may be advised. As noted above, the best fungicide timing for white mold management is at flowering (R1). Source: Emmanuel Byamukama, South Dakota State University Extension
Corn, Bean Futures Rise as Heat Wave Continues in Central Midwest
Corn and beans were higher in overnight trading as hot weather continues in much of the central Corn Belt. Wheat declined. Temperatures are expected to reach triple digits with heat indexes as high as 110 degrees Fahrenheit today in the eastern half of Kansas, southeastern Nebraska, the southern half of Iowa, almost all of Missouri and a large chunk of Illinois, according to the National Weather Service. The heat wave, which is never really welcome, comes at a bad time as corn is silking and soybeans are blooming and setting pods. Crop conditions declined this week with corn, beans and wheat all dropping by 1 percentage point thanks to the extremely hot weather this summer. Corn for December delivery rose 5 cents to $4.01 ¼ a bushel overnight on the Chicago Board of Trade. Soybeans for November delivery gained 8 ¾ cents to $10.21 ¼ a bushel overnight. Soymeal gained $2.40 to $336.60 a short ton and soy oil futures added 0.30 cent to 34.18 cents a pound. Wheat for September delivery fell 1 cent to $5.02 a bushel overnight and Kansas City futures lost ½ cent to $4.99 ¾ a bushel. Source: Agriculture.com
Weather and exports are the main drivers of this morning?s higher ...
Weather and exports are the main drivers of this morning?s higher trade action. Weekly export sales for corn were almost 2 times better than last week. Beans were up 80% from last week. All wheat was up 87% from LW. Traders will be watching for confirmation of needed rainfall across Western Iowa. Tomorrows Cattle on Feed report is expected to show July 1 at 102.9%, June placements at 106.1% and June Marketings at 104.7%. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn +5 to +6, Soybeans +7 to +8, KC Wheat 2 lower. Crude oil +.40c/brl.>
Southern Rust has been confirmed in Cass, Fillmore and York counties ...
Southern Rust has been confirmed in Cass, Fillmore and York counties in Nebraska.>
Speaker says soil health correlates to human health
Jeff Moyer of Rodale Institute, located about an hour northeast of Philadelphia, Penn., made a visit to Hamilton County last week to offer words of advice on soil health and the benefits of organic farming practices during the annual farm tour and seminar at Grain Place Foods. Moyer has been with Rodale Institute for more than 30 years. Read more in this week's print or e-editions. Rate this article:  Select ratingGive Speaker says soil health correlates to human health 1/5Give Speaker says soil health correlates to human health 2/5Give Speaker says soil health correlates to human health 3/5Give Speaker says soil health correlates to human health 4/5Give Speaker says soil health correlates to human health 5/5 No votes yet
New Insecticide Labeled for Soybean Aphid Management
This year, soybean aphids have the potential to reach population densities that exceed the economic threshold of 250 aphids per plant. It is likely that insecticides will be applied to many soybean fields to prevent yield loss. Pyrethroid-Resistant Soybean Aphids For the last two years, researchers in Minnesota have reported failures of insecticides with pyrethroid active ingredients for soybean aphid management. The areas where these pyrethroid resistant soybean aphids have been detected are not localized. Furthermore, pyrethroid resistant soybean aphids were observed in Northwest Iowa in 2016. Although we have no reported insecticide failures in South Dakota, there is the potential for this to occur. Alternative Insecticides Although pyrethroids offer the most economical form of management for the soybean aphid in terms of foliar insecticides, there are alternatives. These include insecticides that contain organophosphates, carbamates, or neonicotinoids as the active ingredient. These products can be found in the current edition of the South Dakota Pest Management Guide: Soybeans. In addition, two products that belong to the group butenolides (4D) have also been labeled for use against soybean aphids in soybean. The active ingredient for these products is flupyradifurone. Table 1 contains the information for these products and recommended rates for soybean aphid management. Source: Adam Varenhorst, South Dakota State University Extension
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USDA Detects a Case of Atypical Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy in Alabama
The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) announced an atypical case of Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (BSE), a neurologic disease of cattle, in an eleven-year old cow in Alabama. This animal never entered slaughter channels and at no time presented a risk to the food supply, or to human health in the United States. USDA Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service's (APHIS) National Veterinary Services Laboratories (NVSL) have determined that this cow was positive for atypical (L-type) BSE. The animal was showing clinical signs and was found through routine surveillance at an Alabama livestock market. APHIS and Alabama veterinary officials are gathering more information on the case. BSE is not contagious and exists in two types – classical and atypical. Classical BSE is the form that occurred primarily in the United Kingdom, beginning in the late 1980's, and it has been linked to variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) in people. The primary source of infection for classical BSE is feed contaminated with the infectious prion agent, such as meat-and-bone meal containing protein derived from rendered infected cattle. Regulations from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have prohibited the inclusion of mammalian protein in feed for cattle and other ruminants since 1997 and have also prohibited high risk tissue materials in all animal feed since 2009. Atypical BSE is different, and it generally occurs in older cattle, usually 8 years of age or greater. It seems to arise rarely and spontaneously in all cattle populations. This is the nation's 5th detection of BSE. Of the four previous U.S. cases, the first was a case of classical BSE that was imported from Canada; the rest have been atypical (H- or L-type) BSE. The World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) has recognized the United States as negligible risk for BSE. As noted in the OIE guidelines for determining this status, atypical BSE cases do not impact official BSE risk status recognition as this form of the disease is believed to occur spontaneously in all cattle populations at a very low rate. Therefore, this finding of an atypical case will not change the negligible risk status of the United States, and should not lead to any trade issues. The United States has a longstanding system of interlocking safeguards against BSE that protects public and animal health in the United States, the most important of which is the removal of specified risk materials – or the parts of an animal that would contain BSE should an animal have the disease – from all animals presented for slaughter. The second safeguard is a strong feed ban that protects cattle from the disease. Another important component of our system – which led to this detection – is our ongoing BSE surveillance program that allows USDA to detect the disease if it exists at very low levels in the U.S. cattle population. U.S. Cattlemen's Association President Kenny Graner said, "It must be reiterated that atypical BSE, as determined by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), does not affect the United States' current status as 'negligible risk for BSE.' This categorization is a direct result of the fact that an atypical case occurs spontaneously in all cattle populations at a very low rate. Today's case will not affect the U.S. trade status or relations, nor will it affect public health." Source: Tri-State Livestock News
Forage Pests Active in Improved Texas Pastures
Forage producers should be on the watch for and ready to act against two pests known for decimating hay fields – fall armyworms and Bermudagrass stem maggots, said a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service expert. Dr. Vanessa Corriher-Olson, AgriLife Extension forage specialist, Overton, said she has been receiving calls and reports regarding fall armyworm and Bermudagrass stem maggot activity in East Texas and Central Texas pastures. Armyworm numbers typically rise in the fall, but weather conditions, such as a dry spell followed by a rain event and cooler temperatures, can lead to flushes of the pest, Corriher-Olson said. “They like cooler, moist conditions, and the last few rain events created the right environment for them,” she said. The armyworm got its name because they appear to march across hay fields, consuming the grass in their path. Producers should scout each morning for armyworms, she said. Armyworms are green, brown or black in color and can be identified by the white inverted Y on their head. They can grow up to 1 inch in length when mature. The threshold for insecticide spray treating a pasture is three or more armyworms per square foot, Corriher-Olson said. Armyworms in those numbers should be treated immediately. Armyworms in the last two or three days of their larvae stage consume 85 percent of their diet. Corriher-Olson recommends insecticides labeled for armyworm control in pastures and hayfields. She said applicators should always follow all label instructions on pesticide use and restrictions. “Armyworms are principally night feeders and can do a lot of damage very quickly,” she said. “So we recommend that producers act immediately once they’ve seen armyworms reach the threshold.” More information about armyworms can be found in AgriLife Extension entomologist Dr. Allen Knutson’s report The Fall Armyworm – Pest of Pastures and Hay at: http://foragefax.tamu.edu/files/2015/08/Armyworm-Fact-Sheet-2015.pdf. Corriher-Olson said she had received several reports of Bermudagrass stem maggot, which hatch inside the grass stem and feed on the plant tissue, typically killing the top two leaves of the plant. The stem maggot is difficult to scout, Corriher-Olson said. Maggots are typically not seen but become a small yellow fly, which is difficult to detect. “Unfortunately, the way we typically detect stem maggots is by finding damage,” she said. “They typically kill the top two to three leaves, so If you look at your field and it looks like there’s been a frost event or you can pull the top two leaves from the stem very easily, you’ll want to take action.” Corriher-Olson said producers should cut their hay meadow to reduce leaf, and therefore yield, losses once stem maggots are detected. Producers should follow by applying a pyrethroid insecticide seven days after the cutting to address the adult flies. AgriLife Extension district summaries can be found here. Source: Texas AgriLife Extension
The Dicamba Dilemma in Illinois-Facts and Speculations
Only a short time ago, many agricultural professionals were optimistic Illinois would somehow be “spared” the incidents of off-target damage caused by dicamba that continue to plague several states to our south. The recent preponderance of evidence (observations made traveling the state, stories on social media, an increasing number of pesticide misuse complaints filed with the Illinois Department of Agriculture (IDOA), etc.), suggests otherwise. Instances of soybean demonstrating symptoms of exposure to dicamba have greatly increased over the past two weeks and it’s nearly certain the number of affected acres will continue to rise. To estimate the extent of this using the number of complaints filed with the IDOA as the sole metric would be to grossly underestimate the current reality. Some might be surprised to learn that instances of soybean exposure to dicamba have been an annual occurrence in Illinois since dicamba was first commercialized almost 50 years ago. One of the first experiments that described soybean’s sensitivity to dicamba was conducted by Dr. Loyd Wax at the University of Illinois in 1966–19671. The stated objective of the experiments “…was to determine the response of soybeans to soil and foliar applications of dicamba, picloram, and 2,4-D to assess the potential hazard of using these herbicides in crops in rotation with soybean and in areas adjacent to soybean fields.” The symptoms of soybean exposure to dicamba described by these researchers 50 years ago are nearly identical to those currently being observed. The widespread adoption of glyphosate-resistant corn hybrids in Illinois during the first decade of the 21st century was accompanied by a decrease in dicamba use in corn, resulting in relatively few complaints of soybean exposure during the last 10 years. With more dicamba currently being applied, it’s not surprising the instances of soybean exposure have increased. Whether applied in corn or dicamba-resistant soybean, the fact remains that few dicot species in the Illinois landscape are more sensitive to dicamba than soybean. Symptoms of exposure: There appears to be some confusion about symptoms of exposure to dicamba compared with leaf symptoms caused by non-dicamba factors. Dr. Wax and his colleagues described the effects of dicamba on soybean leaves as “…cupped and crinkled,” which are terms still commonly used today. Other factors can cause leaf distortions, but I am not aware of anything other than dicamba that causes the following symptoms collectively: 1) ) extreme cupping of trifoliolate leaves, most pronounced on the upper trifoliolates (Figure 1) 2) veins of affected leaves tend to assume a parallel orientation instead of the usual net venation pattern (Figure 2) 3) tips of cupped leaves with parallel veins are often brown or cream-colored 4) plants are stunted as compared to plants not demonstrating the aforementioned symptoms; these plants may sometimes remain stunted the remainder of the season 5) depending on time and dose of exposure, pod development can be adversely affected While the symptoms of exposure to dicamba are apparent, identifying how the exposure occurred is not always obvious. Speculations and “explanations” from some industry personnel have included almost everything except the Russians (stay tuned…that one might be next). Soybean’s extreme sensitivity to dicamba sometimes complicates accurately identifying the source of exposure. Recent research published by Dr. Kevin Bradley, weed scientist at the University of Missouri, indicated symptoms of exposure to dicamba could be induced at 1/20,000 of a 1x (0.5 lb ae/acre) field use rate. Additionally, symptoms generally do not develop immediately after exposure; we have observed instances where 21 days elapsed between exposure and symptom development. Possible routes of exposure: 1) Physical drift of spray particles during the actual application. This route of exposure might be the easiest to identify based on field observations. Symptoms are usually most pronounced along the edge of the field adjacent to the drift source, and lessen as the distance from the source increases (Figure 3). Remember, the symptoms of exposure to dicamba depend largely on the dose. Symptoms are different on soybean directly sprayed with dicamba (often dead plants) compared with soybean exposed to a very low concentration (leaf cupping, etc.) farther from the source. Exposure from physical drift has been observed this year, but it does not appear to account for the majority of off-target exposure instances to date. 2) Residues remaining in/on the spray equipment from previous applications are applied at low concentrations with the POST soybean herbicide. These symptoms are often most pronounced around the perimeter of the field and along the edge where the applicator began spraying the remainder of the field. Symptoms often become less pronounced as the sprayer moves farther across the field away from the side where the application began (Figure 4). Contamination has been touted by some as an explanation for cupping of Liberty Link varieties, but it seems odd that it hasn’t been mentioned much as an explanation for cupping of Roundup Ready varieties. 3) Herbicide vapors on the plant or soil surface move out of the treated field (vapor drift). The volatility of a herbicide (i.e., tendency to change from a liquid to a gas) is a function of several factors related to the formulation of the herbicide and to prevailing environmental conditions. Vapor pressure is a measure of the tendency of a herbicide to volatilize. As the vapor pressure of a herbicide increases, the potential for volatility also increases. Volatility tends to increase as soil moisture and temperature increase. As soil moisture decreases, the amount of herbicide adsorbed to soil colloids can increase and reduce the amount of herbicide available to volatilize. All commercially-available formulations of dicamba have the potential to volatilize. 4) Applications made during temperature inversion conditions. Small droplets can remain suspended in the air when pesticides are applied during temperature inversion conditions. These particles then move out of the target area when winds begin to move the following morning. Where and how far they move depends primarily on wind direction and speed. Labels of dicamba-containing products approved for in-crop application to dicamba-resistant soybean restrict applications during temperature inversions. Some have speculated applications made at night (when inversions occur) have been responsible for off-target damage, but does anyone have actual data on how many acres are treated when headlights are needed on the applicators? Leaf distortions: There has been much conversation about leaf symptoms that likely were not caused by exposure to dicamba. As mentioned previously, symptoms of dicamba exposure can vary according to the dose of exposure and stage of soybean development. However, the symptoms of low-dose exposure tend to be fairly consistent. Can other herbicides cause leaf distortions? Yes, but these symptoms are different from those caused by dicamba. Foliar-applied PPO inhibitors can cause leaf distortions, but the degree of “cupping” is generally much less than that caused by dicamba and the symptoms appear on leaves treated with the application (Figure 5). In contrast, cupping caused by dicamba is generally seen on leaves that emerge after the exposure occurred. We also have observed distorted leaves following POST application of soil-residual herbicides (Figure 6), but these symptoms are very different from those caused by dicamba. Effects on soybean yield: If cupped soybean plants were actually exposed to dicamba, will yield be adversely effected? The answer is that it is absolutely NOT possible at this point of the season to predict whether or not yield will be impacted. Published literature suggests this injury does not always result in soybean yield loss, but several factors are involved in determining if yield loss will occur. In particular, soybean growth stage at the time of exposure, dosage of exposure, and growing conditions for the remainder of the growing season are important factors that determine if yield loss does or does not occur. Much of the available literature suggests that if minor exposure occurs during early vegetative development, yield loss is less likely to occur than if exposure occurs when soybean have entered reproductive development. However, there are no data that describe yield effects on soybean exposed to dicamba more than once. Comments heard from the field and industry: I have attempted to describe the current situation in Illinois as accurately as possible, and to provide data-derived information related to soybean exposure to dicamba. As mentioned previously, soybean injury from dicamba has occurred each year in Illinois since the product was first commercialized. However, the response of some individuals from companies who market formulations approved for use in dicamba-resistant varieties has been unlike anything I’ve experienced during my 24-year tenure at the University of Illinois. Some comments heard from the field, social media, and industry are, in my opinion, quite troubling. “Only a negligible percentage of soybean acres are affected” I doubt anyone has completely accurate data on the actual number of soybean acres that have been impacted by dicamba. Even if those data support the aforementioned statement, I haven’t spoken with many farmers who consider themselves or their acres as “negligible.” Merely counting official reports filed with the IDOA does not accurately reflect the extent of acres impacted. “Thoroughly investigate before drawing conclusions” Excellent advice, especially when followed. Without question, there have been instances of symptom misidentification. I attempted to describe some of these in this article. However, it seems that other factors are repeatedly being mentioned as able to cause leaf cupping. Environmental conditions are frequently mentioned as inducing leaf cupping, yet I cannot find any peer-reviewed literature that specify or describe these conditions. If these conditions exist, one would speculate they could be replicated under controlled conditions to confirm their impact on symptom development. Also curious to me is that I have yet to see or have anyone report cupping of dicamba-resistant varieties. Are these varieties somehow immune to these environmental conditions? “The instances of volatility likely are due to applying older, non-approved formulations” Again I ask, where are the data that indicate older formulations are being applied? If we should “thoroughly investigate before drawing conclusions,” it seems premature to me to conclude the instances of volatility are wholly attributable to older dicamba formulations. Much discussion has been made about the newer formulations that are purportedly lower volatility formulations. These statements will have to be taken at face value, as I am aware of only one university that has evaluated volatility of only one commercial formulation. Please keep in mind that low volatility is not the same as no volatility. The new formulations are still volatile, albeit less volatile than older formulations. Symptoms in many affected fields do NOT follow patterns associated with physical drift or contaminated application equipment, and exposure though volatility remains a very possible source of exposure. “It is unlikely yield will be reduced. You might even see a yield increase.” This is perhaps the most troubling statement I have heard. In my opinion, statements similar to these are unprofessional and unethical. These individuals do NOT have the necessary data to make such bold predictions, which includes: 1) when the exposure occurred 2) the dose of the exposure 3) what the growing conditions will be like the remainder of the season When dicamba is applied in a state that grows soybean, the occurrence of off-target symptoms is not a question of “if,”, but rather “scale.” Some suggest the solution is to plant all soybean acres to dicamba-resistant varieties. That might solve issues associated with soybean, but would likely increase the incidents of damage to other dicot species across the Illinois landscape. Literature cited: Wax LM, Knuth LA, Slife FW (1969) Response of soybean to 2,4-D, dicamba, and picloram. Weed Sci 17:388–393. Source: Aaron Hager, University of Illinois Extension
Josh Dexter from Wood River talks about the different pests he is ...
Josh Dexter from Wood River talks about the different pests he is seeing in the fields and what farmer-owners can do to curb any more yield damage. #YourYieldTour #YourYieldsMatter #YourYieldsYourFields>
Your Yield Tour -- Josh Dexter on Western Bean Cutworm
Southern rust has been confirmed by @UNLPlantClinic in eastern ...
Southern rust has been confirmed by @UNLPlantClinic in eastern Nebraska corn. Be on the lookout and continue to scout your fields. #YourYieldsMatter>
National
Appropriations amendment expands H-2A program
The House Appropriations Committee has approved an amendment that extends the H-2A guest worker visa program to all of agriculture. Introduced by Congressman Dan Newhouse of Washington, the amendment was approved as part of the Fiscal Year 2018 Homeland Security Appropriations Act and provides dairy, livestock and other agricultural sectors access to the program. The H-2A program would remain a temporary source of ag labor and there are still time limits for how low workers can stay in the U.S. Continue reading Appropriations amendment expands H-2A program at Brownfield Ag News.      
Atypical BSE not a threat
The chief veterinarian for USDA says he has every expectation the case of atypical BSE in an Alabama cow is isolated. “It’s spontaneous, so our epidemiology should not be that difficult.” That?s Dr. Jack Shere, who explains USDA?s process when the neurological cattle disease is detected. “We do a trace-back on the animal.? We do epidemiology on the animals (the sick) animal is housed with, and on any offspring.? Continue reading Atypical BSE not a threat at Brownfield Ag News.      
Storms bring mixed bag along Iowa/Minnesota border
Severe weather brought some welcome and unwelcome conditions through northern Iowa and southern Minnesota Wednesday. Martin County, Minnesota farmer Lawrence Sukalski says he was in a machine shed early last evening when the first round of thunderstorms moved in. “Very, very high winds here on the Minnesota and Iowa border.? I don’t know how wide a band it was, but it hailed for about 10 minutes.? And during the stage of the corn now when it’s tasseling, that’s a little bit of a concern.? Continue reading Storms bring mixed bag along Iowa/Minnesota border at Brownfield Ag News.      
Midday cash livestock markets
Direct cash cattle markets are quiet after the light trade that developed late Wednesday in Nebraska. Sales were mostly at $188 on the dressed basis, down $2 from last week’s weighted average, with a few as high as $189 to $190. Profit margins have narrowed recently and widespread business may wait until after Friday’s USDA numbers. Asking prices are around $121 to $122 live and $190 to $192 dressed with bids reported at $115 to $117 live and $187 and $190 dressed. Continue reading Midday cash livestock markets at Brownfield Ag News.      
Minnesota Corn Growers hire two full-time district field managers
The Minnesota Corn Growers Association (MCGA) has hired two full-time district field managers to help members get more involved in leadership and advocacy. Heidie Sloot will represent the south-central region comprising 13 counties and says she views her role as a liaison between the state organization and county members. Sloot recently graduated from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities with a degree in agricultural education, and worked with the Minnesota Department of Agriculture in its Minnesota Grown Program. Continue reading Minnesota Corn Growers hire two full-time district field managers at Brownfield Ag News.      
Old crop corn, soybean exports up on week
The USDA reports old crop corn and soybean export sales for the week ending July 13th were larger than what most analysts were expecting. Physical shipments of corn and wheat were above what’s needed weekly to meet USDA projections for their respective marketing years. The 2016/17 marketing year for corn, soybeans, and sorghum runs through the end of August. Wheat came out at 669,500 tons (24.6 million bushels), up 87% from the week ending July 6th and 52% higher than the four week average. Continue reading Old crop corn, soybean exports up on week at Brownfield Ag News.      
Clemens pork processing plant leading to more expansions
Hog production has been steadily expanding in the Eastern Corn Belt with the first new hog processing facility in the region in more than 25 years set to open by Labor Day. The Clemens Food Group?s 650,000 square foot fresh pork processing plant in Coldwater, near the Michigan, Indiana, and Ohio border, will process up to 10,000 pigs from surrounding states per day. For Michigan, Department of Agriculture Director Jamie Clover Adams tells Brownfield that?s meant a growing number of new pork farms seeking Right to Farm protections.? Continue reading Clemens pork processing plant leading to more expansions at Brownfield Ag News.      
Alternative egg production systems create hen health challenges
?A major paradigm shift.? That?s how Dr. John Schleifer, staff veterinarian for Iowa-based egg producer Rembrandt Foods, describes the move to alternative production systems?organic, cage-free and antibiotic-free?taking place in the egg industry. And Schleifer says it?s creating new challenges for those charged with maintaining hen health. ?As we move into more diverse production systems, with any type of change, we?re going to see a dynamic change as far as diseases are concerned,? Schleifer says. Continue reading Alternative egg production systems create hen health challenges at Brownfield Ag News.      
Two more USDA nominees announced
The Trump Administration has announced two more nominees for top positions in the USDA. Indiana ag director Ted McKinney has been tapped to fill the newly-created position of undersecretary for trade and foreign agricultural affairs. Sam Clovis, a former economics professor at Morningside College in Sioux City, Iowa and now a senior advisor to U.S. Ag Secretary Sonny Perdue, is the nominee for undersecretary for research, education and economics. Perdue issued the following statements on McKinney and Clovis. Continue reading Two more USDA nominees announced at Brownfield Ag News.      
Iowa crops could use some rain
Two northern Iowa farmers say their crops look good, but could use some rain. Dean Coleman farms near Humboldt in north-central Iowa. He says they?ve only had four inches of rain since the end of May and the crops are showing signs of stress. ?You can start to see from last Monday to this Monday, the light spots are starting to deteriorate a bit,? Coleman says. ?The corn to starting to shrink a little bit and the beans are rolling up just a little bit.? But Coleman says the pollination of corn?appears to be going well. Continue reading Iowa crops could use some rain at Brownfield Ag News.      
Marketing advisor: Time is running out for a big rally
An ag marketing advisor says another rally in corn and soybeans this summer is possible.? But Paul Mussman, president of AgWest Commodities, says time is running out for a significant up move. ?The major reports are done?the plantings, the intentions?all that?s past us,? Mussman says. ?We?re into weather now. As we finish out this crop, weather is going to be number one?and the number two is going to be the funds. Are they going to open up their checkbook and continue to try to build a long position in here to help hype and bring some volatility into higher prices with these markets?? Mussman says the large carryovers in corn and soybeans will continue to weigh on prices well into 2018. Continue reading Marketing advisor: Time is running out for a big rally at Brownfield Ag News.      
Generational transfer of wealth a major challenge for farmers
The president of a company specializing in ag real estate says the generational transfer of wealth is becoming one of the biggest challenges for farmers. Doug Hensley with Hertz Services, based in central Iowa, tells Brownfield the money required to operate a farm today is much greater compared to previous generations. “I looked at some numbers from the U.S. Ag Census 30 years ago, and the number of young people at that time that were involved in agriculture compared to now. Continue reading Generational transfer of wealth a major challenge for farmers at Brownfield Ag News.      
DMI says milk fat demand rising thanks to checkoff research
A dairy industry group says increased demand for milk fat is boosting milk prices.? Dairy Management Inc. CEO Tom Gallagher says farmer-funded nutrition research over the past two decades through the dairy checkoff program has shown the benefits of milk fat, and now the government and consumers are changing their views about dairy products. Peter Vitaliano with the National Milk Producers Federation says whole milk sales are now trending upward. ?“Fluid milk had been on a long decline, but in terms of fluid whole milk, that decline was very sharply reversed around 2013 and we’re seeing increased sales month to month of 5% year-on-year.” He says other fluid milks are using more milk fat as well, and along with butter, it?s keeping demand strong. ? Continue reading DMI says milk fat demand rising thanks to checkoff research at Brownfield Ag News.      
Drought likely to continue in Western Corn Belt
An ag meteorologist says there is excess rainfall in the forecast for the Upper Midwest and Great Lakes regions in the coming days while there?s some drought relief for parts of the Northern Great Plains and Western Corn Belt. ?The drought continues on severe and exceptional.? But would you believe there might be some localized improvement?? The potential for some of that monsoon moisture to arch it?s way along the divide, pick up with strength and energy from the jet stream and actually begin here in the coming weeks over parts of Montana, parts of the western and central Dakotas.?? Brownfield?s Greg Soulje says those weather patterns are likely to cause some severe storms in the West while the Eastern Corn Belt is expected to see more moderate weather for the remainder of this growing season. Continue reading Drought likely to continue in Western Corn Belt at Brownfield Ag News.      
Planting season rain causes split pollination
A Southeastern Illinois grower expects a decent crop despite highly variable conditions on his farm.? Charles McDonald of Robinson, Illinois, endured a challenging planting season with 10 inches of late April rain forcing an unplanned break. His early corn is pollinated, but he?s concerned about what effects heat and dry weather will have on what remains to be pollinated. ?We?ve had the little rains that keep you going,? McDonald told Brownfield Ag News during a Balance GT Experience Tour event near Indianapolis Wednesday, ?but you have to continuously get those in order to have a decent crop, but at this time we?re looking at hopefully average to maybe slightly above average if everything can kind of hold together.? McDonald takes in stride that some of his ground suffers from a dry spell, but at the same time borders the Wabash River, swollen from heavy rain upstream. Continue reading Planting season rain causes split pollination at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
Seed Price Triples Over Last 20 Years
Input prices have dropped in recent years with small changes in seed.
Poultry Farms in India Resemble Superbug Reservoirs, Study Finds
Largest such study finds rampant antibiotic use in chickens.
You think this is bad?
Morning Market Audio 7/20/17
Could AgTech Solve Water Scarcity Issues?
Testing is underway at Purdue University on a “human-computer collaborative decision-making system.” More simply put – Purdue researchers want to make it easier to make otherwise more complex irrigation decisions.
Export Sales Important To Long-term Uptrend
Good Morning! From Allendale, Inc. with the early morning commentary for July 20, 2017. Grain markets are consolidating as traders wait for this morning?s weather model runs. We are picking up a little more farmer selling into the recent rally causing some head winds. The weak US Dollar is supportive to export competition.
Scientists to Unveil New Tool to Map Bees Around Farms
Scientists with the University of Maine say they have developed a new tool to allow blueberry growers to get a handle on how many bees they can expect to see around their fields.
Tight Wheat Supply Risks Leaving U.K. Reliant on Imports Again
EU’s 3rd-largest grower may see feed-wheat shortage in 2017-18.
Tight Wheat Supply Risks Leaving U.K. Reliant on Imports Again
Tight Wheat Supply Risks Leaving U.K. Reliant on Imports Again
Be Careful Taking Risks in Second Half of 2017 in Hogs
Hog prices in 2017 have been fairly impressive, and strong consumer demand is keeping the lean hog market strong.
SoftBank Vision Fund Leads $200 Million Bet on Indoor Farms
The investment will help Plenty expand around the world.
Former DuPont President Named Senior Ag Advisor for Zero Gravity Solutions
Zero Gravity Solutions, Inc. (ZGSI), an agricultural biotechnology public company commercializing its technology derived from and designed for space with significant applications for agriculture on Earth, announced the addition of Rik Miller, a 31-year veteran of the DuPont Crop Protection, to its senior advisory group. Miller worked at DuPont from 1984 to 2015, where he held numerous successive senior leadership and management roles in sales and marketing in DuPont?s agricultural chemicals business. As president of DuPont Crop Protection, Miller developed and executed strategic growth plans, directed the global research and development investment, and coordinated introduction of innovative technologies and products on a global scale. He also served on CropLife International?s Strategy Council and under appointment to the USDA Secretary of Agriculture?s Agricultural Policy Advisory Committee and has been actively involved in promoting youth development programs through the National Future Farmers of America Organization, National 4-H Organization and other non-profit organizations. Miller also currently serves on the Board of Directors of Cool Planet Energy Systems, Douglas Products, Montana FFA Foundation, and is a senior advisor for Altamont Capital Partners. He holds a degree in Agronomy from Montana State University with majors in plant and soil science and plant biochemistry. ?Mr. Miller?s industry and technical experience along with his company building background provides the necessary skills and perspective to assist us in maximizing the impact of our BAM-FX technology to the world?s agricultural markets. The unique ability of BAM-FX to not only act as a delivery mechanism for itself, but to also potentially enhance the efficiency of other agricultural products when combined with BAM-FX, can position our platform technology as a bridge technology for major agricultural companies looking to make their own products perform more efficiently,? stated Harvey Kaye, ZGSI?s Chairman of the Board. ?Upon my review of BAM Agricultural Solutions? technology, I was impressed with the consistency of crop performance enhancement over multiple-year trials and also the variety of crops on which the product has been tested. The agricultural industry is looking for innovative ways to enhance sustainable productivity while increasing return on investment. Utilizing the science of the BAM-FX technology platform may represent an effective and efficient approach toward accomplishing that goal,? stated Miller, ZGSI?s new Senior Strategic Agricultural Advisor.
DuPont, Monsanto Urge Transparent GMO Crop Reviews in China
Global seeds giants have called for transparent, science-based approvals processes for new crop types after China approved two more genetically modified (GMO) crops for import, but left four others on the waiting list, according to an article on Reuters.com. China on Monday approved Syngenta?s 5307 insect-resistant corn sold under the Agrisure Duracade brand and Monsanto?s 87427 glyphosate-resistant corn, sold under the Roundup Ready brand, for a period of three years. The move was the second in the past month to expand access to biotech seeds as part of Beijing?s 100-day trade talks with Washington, and took total approvals to four after Dow Chemical Co?s Enlist corn and Monsanto?s Vistive Gold soybeans were given the go-ahead last month. But it leaves four other products owned by Monsanto, DuPont and Dow on a waiting list pending approval. DuPont was “disappointed” its Pioneer insect-resistant corn was not included, a spokeswoman said in an email. The other three crops are Dow?s Enlist soybeans and two alfalfa products developed by Monsanto. Monsanto also found it “disappointing” that not all six products in the late stage of review received approvals, the company?s spokeswoman Christi Dixon said in an statement emailed to Reuters. Read the full story on Reuters.com.
Dow Executive Named New CEO at Lindsay Corp.
Lindsay Corp. has ?announced the appointment of Timothy Hassinger as president and CEO and a member of its board of directors, effective October 16, 2017. Hassinger will succeed President and CEO Rick Parod, who previously announced he is retiring later this year after 17 years of service to the company. “The board unanimously agrees that Tim is the right choice to lead this great company into the future,” said Michael C. Nahl, Lindsay’s Chairman of the Board. “He brings global business experience with an exceptional track record of business leadership and creating profitable growth. This, combined with his people and customer focused operating style, has fueled his ability to exceed customer expectations and consistently deliver strong financial results.” Tim Hassinger of Dow AgroSciences will become the new president and CEO at Lindsay Corp., effective October 16, 2017. Hassinger, 55, currently serves as President and CEO of Dow AgroSciences, headquartered in Indianapolis, IN. Dow AgroSciences, a subsidiary of The Dow Chemical Co., is a leader in seeds and crop protection chemicals with more than $6 billion of sales in 120 countries and 8,000 employees. “I look forward to working with the board and management team at Lindsay to build on the strong Lindsay brand and innovative products to provide new solutions to customers around the world,” said Hassinger. A 33-year veteran of Dow AgroSciences, Hassinger has held a series of senior leadership positions throughout his career across a variety of the company’s domestic and international business units. Prior to becoming President and CEO of Dow AgroSciences in 2014, he served as the company’s Global Commercial Leader and Vice President for the Crop Protection Global Business Unit. Previously he served as Vice President for the Dow AgroSciences business in the Europe, Latin America, and Pacific regions. In 2005 he moved to Shanghai, China where he served as Regional Commercial Unit Leader for Greater China. From 1984 to 2005 he proceeded to hold a variety of commercial and supply chain positions of increasing responsibility. Hassinger received his Bachelor of Science degree in Agricultural Economics from the University of Illinois and grew up on a family farm in Central Illinois. He is also active in a number of industry associations, as well as civic and charitable causes. Nahl concluded, “On behalf of our shareholders, board and executive team, I want to thank Rick Parod for his many contributions over the past 17 years. Under his leadership, Lindsay has grown from a single plant generating approximately $100 million in revenues to an international leader in irrigation solutions, water management and infrastructure products with revenues of over $500 million. During his tenure he and his talented management team have invested in organic growth opportunities, completed a number of accretive and synergistic acquisitions and created over $1 billion in shareholder value as measured by share price appreciation, share buybacks and dividends. His contributions leave the company well positioned for continued future success.”