@C - CORN - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Dec '17 356'2 349'4 353'4 3'2
Mar '18 368'6 362'2 366'0 3'0
May '18 377'0 370'4 374'4 3'2
Jul '18 383'6 377'4 381'4 3'4
Sep '18 390'2 383'6 388'0 3'2
Dec '18 399'0 392'0 396'4 3'0
@S - SOYBEANS - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Nov '17 987'0 969'0 984'2 13'4
Jan '18 997'0 979'4 994'4 13'4
Mar '18 1006'0 988'4 1003'4 13'2
May '18 1013'6 997'0 1011'4 13'0
Jul '18 1020'0 1003'4 1017'6 12'6
Aug '18 1019'2 1015'0 1017'4 12'2
Sep '18 1009'2 1000'0 1007'2 11'0
@K - HARD RED WINTER WHEAT - KCBT
Month High Low Last Chg
Dec '17 452'4 445'0 450'2 0'6
Mar '18 470'2 463'2 468'0 0'4
May '18 482'6 476'0 480'4 0'2
Jul '18 499'4 492'6 497'4 0'2
@L - LIVE CATTLE - CME
Month High Low Last Chg
Oct '17 111.825 109.700 111.575 1.475
Dec '17 117.725 115.650 117.425 1.225
@C - COTTON #2 - ICEFU
Month High Low Last Chg
Oct '17 69.30 68.80 69.09 0.05
Dec '17 68.77 67.86 68.46 0.21
Mar '18 67.90 67.30 67.58 0.00
DTN Click here for info on Exchange delays.
National
Beneficial moisture to expand across the Plains
Across the Corn Belt, showers are confined to the upper Great Lakes region. Elsewhere, very warm, dry weather is ideal for developmentally delayed corn and soybeans. On September 17, corn was at least 15 percentage points behind the 5-year state average maturation pace in Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and the Dakotas. On the Plains, late-season heat across most of the region continues to promote summer crop maturation and fieldwork, including harvest activities and winter wheat planting. Continue reading Beneficial moisture to expand across the Plains at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
Kubota To Open $90M Parts Center in Kansas
Kubota announces plans today to invest $90 million to build logistics hub in Kansas to deliver repair parts for agricultural equipment as soon as the next day starting in 2019
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So cool!! Great shot!
So cool!! Great shot!>
Come visit us today at the tailgate!! Our Animal Nutrition team is ...
Come visit us today at the tailgate!! Our Animal Nutrition team is putting on a great event!>
Beautiful!
Beautiful!>
So cute! Thanks for sharing Paige!
So cute! Thanks for sharing Paige!>
It's that time of year!
It's that time of year!>
Great pic!! Thanks for sharing with us!
Great pic!! Thanks for sharing with us!>
Your weekly update from Dawn Caldwell, Head of Government Affairs at ...
Your weekly update from Dawn Caldwell, Head of Government Affairs at Aurora Cooperative. http://auroracooperative.blog/2017/09/22/government-affairs-update-september-22-2017/>
What a fun lunch hour today celebrating the kickoff of the Sutton ...
What a fun lunch hour today celebrating the kickoff of the Sutton Public School Beef In Schools Program! Thank you for a great burger!>
Got our first picture in! Thanks for sharing!
Got our first picture in! Thanks for sharing!>
Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for a full-time with ...
Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for a full-time with benefits Grain Hedge Desk Coordinator. This position coordinates all activities effected by grain commodity hedging. Will lead analysis and execution of daily trading activities, support development, updating, interpretation, and auditing of daily grain reports, and interact with grain trading, origination, and back office operations to support daily activities. Requires a minimum of a Bachelor's degree and experience with commodity futures market is preferred. Apply here: http://auroracoop.com/ContactUs. Resume can also be sent to Aurora Cooperative, PO Box 209, Aurora, NE 68818, Attn: Human Resources. Aurora Cooperative is an equal opportunity employer.>
Harvest is here and it's time for another photo contest! We did this ...
Harvest is here and it's time for another photo contest! We did this during planting season and we want to do it again! Send us your best harvest pictures throughout the season, whether it be from the cab, during the night, or with your favorite combine riders we want to see them! All you have to do is submit your picture and like our page! A winner will be picked every Friday and they will receive a $50 gift card to Cabela's. We are going to do this the entire harvest season! We wish you a safe harvest!>
Yesterday?s price action was neutral but futures overnight were ...
Yesterday?s price action was neutral but futures overnight were supported with continued talk of strong bean demand. Chinese soybean, meal, and corn values have been higher this week supporting the demand outlook here in the US. The US Dollar is also lower this morning helping support CME grains. Continued dryness in Australia has traders continuing to lower wheat production estimates. On the open at 8:30 a.m., corn trading 2 cents higher, soybeans up a dime, KC wheat a penny higher.>
Harvest is underway! Our Sedan terminal was busy today and into the ...
Harvest is underway! Our Sedan terminal was busy today and into the night! Our lights are on until yours are off! #harvest17>
Futures overnight traded both sides of unchanged in light volume. ...
Futures overnight traded both sides of unchanged in light volume. Yesterday afternoon, the USDA reported that corn harvest is 7% nationally, compared to 11% on average. Soybean harvest is 4% complete, only a point behind our historical average. The chatter in the marketplace continues about how crop conditions have been deteriorating and what the final production numbers will be. Traders continue to watch the dryness in Australia. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn up a penny, Soybeans down ? cent, and KC Wheat up 3 cents.>
AGRONOMY SERVICE POSITION Aurora Cooperative is accepting ...
AGRONOMY SERVICE POSITION Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for full-time agronomy service and applicator positions with benefits at the York location. CDL and Hazmat preferred or able to obtain one. Contact Danielle Scheele at 402-366-2583 or send application to 1320 Road L, York, NE 68467. Aurora Cooperative is an Equal Opportunity Employer.>
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So cool!! Great shot!
So cool!! Great shot!>
Come visit us today at the tailgate!! Our Animal Nutrition team is ...
Come visit us today at the tailgate!! Our Animal Nutrition team is putting on a great event!>
Beautiful!
Beautiful!>
So cute! Thanks for sharing Paige!
So cute! Thanks for sharing Paige!>
It's that time of year!
It's that time of year!>
Great pic!! Thanks for sharing with us!
Great pic!! Thanks for sharing with us!>
Your weekly update from Dawn Caldwell, Head of Government Affairs at ...
Your weekly update from Dawn Caldwell, Head of Government Affairs at Aurora Cooperative. http://auroracooperative.blog/2017/09/22/government-affairs-update-september-22-2017/>
What a fun lunch hour today celebrating the kickoff of the Sutton ...
What a fun lunch hour today celebrating the kickoff of the Sutton Public School Beef In Schools Program! Thank you for a great burger!>
Got our first picture in! Thanks for sharing!
Got our first picture in! Thanks for sharing!>
Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for a full-time with ...
Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for a full-time with benefits Grain Hedge Desk Coordinator. This position coordinates all activities effected by grain commodity hedging. Will lead analysis and execution of daily trading activities, support development, updating, interpretation, and auditing of daily grain reports, and interact with grain trading, origination, and back office operations to support daily activities. Requires a minimum of a Bachelor's degree and experience with commodity futures market is preferred. Apply here: http://auroracoop.com/ContactUs. Resume can also be sent to Aurora Cooperative, PO Box 209, Aurora, NE 68818, Attn: Human Resources. Aurora Cooperative is an equal opportunity employer.>
Nebraska Ag Update - September 22, 2017
Nebraska Ag Updates
Fall Grazing Offers Opportunities and Challenges
After a summer of drought in North Dakota, pastures have been used heavily and cattle producers are looking for forage options to get them through the fall. “In areas that have received late-summer rains, producers may be able to benefit from green-up of pastures and hay land, regrowth from cereal and annual forages cut for hay, or crop volunteer regrowth,” says Janna Kincheloe, the North Dakota State University Extension Service’s area livestock systems specialist at the Hettinger Research Extension Center. “It is important to consider grazing management and potential plant and animal health implications when developing options for fall forage opportunities.” John Dhuyvetter, NDSU Extension area livestock systems specialist at the North Central Research Extension Center near Minot, adds “With continued moisture stress, and anticipated cooler temperatures and possible frosts, there are concerns with potential toxicities and transitioning cattle from a dry, fibrous mature plant diet to highly digestible immature regrowth.” One such concern is nitrate accumulation in regrowth of annual forage crops. Plants are immature and high in nitrogen. Clipping a representative sample and testing the crop prior to livestock turnout can provide an indication of nitrate levels and potential toxicity at a point in time. Prussic acid also can accumulate in several crops such as sorghum and sorghum-sudan grass crosses. The specialists recommend that producers avoid allowing their cattle to graze on these crops for at least seven to 10 days after a killing frost to let the plants dry. If conditions allow for regrowth after a frost, new shoots and leaves also are likely to be very high in prussic acid. Feeding these crops as green chop, silage or hay instead of allowing animals to graze them can reduce the risk of prussic acid poisoning. “Bloat also can be an issue anytime that cattle have an opportunity to consume large quantities of immature, highly digestible forage, particularly in pastures that are made up of 50 percent or more of legumes such as alfalfa or clover,” Kincheloe says. “Volunteer canola also carries risk of bloat.” The incidence of bloat tends to be greater early in the day, following a rain or after a frost. Best management practices include turning cattle into regrowth in midday after they’ve been grazing elsewhere and after a full feed of dry hay. “If possible, provide access to other grazing, such as a permanent pasture, simultaneously,” Dhuyvetter suggests. “Providing a poloxalene block prior to and during grazing and placing hay bales in the field for grazing are additional management considerations.” If volunteer grains matured to seed formation or abandoned areas of the field have mature grain, grain overload from selective grazing could be a problem. High grain intake by cattle not adapted to grain can lead to bloat, founder or death. To manage these issues, producers should use strip grazing to limit access and/or adapt cattle to grain a week or so prior to grazing. Kevin Sedivec, NDSU Extension rangeland management specialist, recommends that producers thinking of extending the grazing season into the fall on native range should try to use pastures that were deferred or lightly grazed during the growing season. Defoliation of plants at this time may limit the ability of the plants to store energy through the winter, which can impact forage production next spring. “If producers have no choice but to graze native pastures, they should try to maintain an adequate stubble height (typically 50 percent of ungrazed mature plant height or 4 to 6 inches, depending on plant species) and stock pastures lightly,” Sedivec says. “Pastures grazed late in the fall should not be used immediately during the following spring.” Regardless of what type of grazing a producer is considering, providing adequate salt and mineral is a good idea, according to the specialists. With rapid regrowth of cool-season forage, magnesium supplementation may be necessary to help cattle avoid grass tetany. “A variety of options are available for extending the grazing season into the fall and making efficient use of available resources,” Dhuyvetter states. “This can be particularly beneficial in getting calves to traditional weaning at good weights and putting some weight back on cows. With testing, avoiding turning hungry cows into unfamiliar feed and closely managing grazing, these opportunities can be managed successfully.” Source: North Dakota State University Extension
The World's Wheat Market Has Changed
The world’s wheat market has changed — and the result does not look good for the home team. During the last 10 years, world wheat production has increased 22 percent, and world consumption has increased 21 percent. World exports have increased 46 percent. U.S. production, total use, and exports have declined. At the beginning of the 2008/09 wheat marketing year (June 1, 2008), the five-year average world production was 22.1 billion bushels. At the beginning of the 2017/18 wheat marketing year, the five-year average world production was 27.0 billion bushels. The increase in world production was 4.9 billion bushel (22 percent). During this same 10-year period, U.S. wheat production (five-year averages) went from 2.09 billion bushels in 2008/09 to 2.045 billion bushels in 2017/18 — a 45 million bushel (2.2 percent) decline in U.S. production. WIDESPREAD PRODUCTION INCREASES Of the world’s 4.9 billion bushel increase in production, a 1.4 billion bushel increase (29 percent) was in the former Soviet Union (FSU-12) countries (Russia, 767 million bushels; the Ukraine, 440 million bushels; and Kazakhstan, 52 million bushels). China’s production increased 1.05 billion bushels (22 percent); production in the EU-28 increased 865 million bushels (18 percent); and production in India increased 788 million bushels (16 percent). Wheat production also increased in Canada (248 million bushels, 5 percent), Australia (214 million bushels, 4 percent), and Pakistan (163 million bushels, 3 percent). Lower production was reported in Argentina (-73 million bushels) and the U.S. (-38 million bushels). Production is a function of harvested acres and yields. In the 10-year period between 2007 and 2017 (using five-year averages), world wheat harvested acres increased from 529 million acres to 547 million acres (an 18 million acre increase). Increased harvested acres were reported for the FSU-12 (10.9 million acres), India (10 million acres), and the EU-28 (3.6 million acres). Lower harvested acres were reported for the U.S. (-6 million acres), Argentina (-3.7 million acres), and Australia (-1 million acres). YIELDS UP SUBSTANTIALLY On average, world wheat yields increased from 41.8 bushels per acre to 49.4 bushels. No major wheat producing country reported a decline in yields. Canada reported the highest yield increase, 10.4 bushels per acre, followed by the EU-28, reporting 9.2 bushels, and the FSU-12, with 9.1 bushels. The U.S. reported an increase of 4.9 bushels. Reported yields for the 2017/18 marketing year are 83 bushels per acre for the EU-28, 47 bushels for Argentina, 46 bushels for the U.S., 44 bushels for Canada, 41 bushels for the FSU-12 (the Ukraine-60, Russia-45, and Kasakastan-18), and for Australia, 27 bushels. At the beginning of the 2008/09 wheat marketing year, the world’s five-year average exports were 4.15 billion bushels. At the beginning of the 2017/18 wheat marketing year, the five-year average world exports were 6.35 billion bushels, a 2.2 billion bushel or 53 percent increase. Countries with increased exports were the FSU-12 (Russia 27 million bushels; the Ukraine 477 million bushels, and Kazakhstan 46 million bushels), the EU-28 (732 million bushels), Canada (218 million bushels), and Australia (215 million bushels). Lower exports were reported for the U.S. (-187 million bushels), and Argentina (-61 million bushels). During the last 10 years, world wheat production and exports have shifted to the FSU and EU countries, along with China and India. Improved production practices and technology may have resulted in higher yields and increased harvested acres. The facts indicate that the world wheat market has changed; those changes are probably permanent; and the changes are not favorable for U.S. wheat production or prices. Source: Kim Anderson, Southwest Farm Press
Harvest is here and it's time for another photo contest! We did this ...
Harvest is here and it's time for another photo contest! We did this during planting season and we want to do it again! Send us your best harvest pictures throughout the season, whether it be from the cab, during the night, or with your favorite combine riders we want to see them! All you have to do is submit your picture and like our page! A winner will be picked every Friday and they will receive a $50 gift card to Cabela's. We are going to do this the entire harvest season! We wish you a safe harvest!>
The World's Wheat Market Has Changed, and That's Not Favorable for the U.S.
The world’s wheat market has changed — and the result does not look good for the home team. During the last 10 years, world wheat production has increased 22 percent, and world consumption has increased 21 percent. World exports have increased 46 percent. U.S. production, total use, and exports have declined. At the beginning of the 2008/09 wheat marketing year (June 1, 2008), the five-year average world production was 22.1 billion bushels. At the beginning of the 2017/18 wheat marketing year, the five-year average world production was 27.0 billion bushels. The increase in world production was 4.9 billion bushel (22 percent). During this same 10-year period, U.S. wheat production (five-year averages) went from 2.09 billion bushels in 2008/09 to 2.045 billion bushels in 2017/18 — a 45 million bushel (2.2 percent) decline in U.S. production. WIDESPREAD PRODUCTION INCREASES Of the world’s 4.9 billion bushel increase in production, a 1.4 billion bushel increase (29 percent) was in the former Soviet Union (FSU-12) countries (Russia, 767 million bushels; the Ukraine, 440 million bushels; and Kazakhstan, 52 million bushels). China’s production increased 1.05 billion bushels (22 percent); production in the EU-28 increased 865 million bushels (18 percent); and production in India increased 788 million bushels (16 percent). Wheat production also increased in Canada (248 million bushels, 5 percent), Australia (214 million bushels, 4 percent), and Pakistan (163 million bushels, 3 percent). Lower production was reported in Argentina (-73 million bushels) and the U.S. (-38 million bushels). Production is a function of harvested acres and yields. In the 10-year period between 2007 and 2017 (using five-year averages), world wheat harvested acres increased from 529 million acres to 547 million acres (an 18 million acre increase). Increased harvested acres were reported for the FSU-12 (10.9 million acres), India (10 million acres), and the EU-28 (3.6 million acres). Lower harvested acres were reported for the U.S. (-6 million acres), Argentina (-3.7 million acres), and Australia (-1 million acres). YIELDS UP SUBSTANTIALLY On average, world wheat yields increased from 41.8 bushels per acre to 49.4 bushels. No major wheat producing country reported a decline in yields. Canada reported the highest yield increase, 10.4 bushels per acre, followed by the EU-28, reporting 9.2 bushels, and the FSU-12, with 9.1 bushels. The U.S. reported an increase of 4.9 bushels. Reported yields for the 2017/18 marketing year are 83 bushels per acre for the EU-28, 47 bushels for Argentina, 46 bushels for the U.S., 44 bushels for Canada, 41 bushels for the FSU-12 (the Ukraine-60, Russia-45, and Kasakastan-18), and for Australia, 27 bushels. At the beginning of the 2008/09 wheat marketing year, the world’s five-year average exports were 4.15 billion bushels. At the beginning of the 2017/18 wheat marketing year, the five-year average world exports were 6.35 billion bushels, a 2.2 billion bushel or 53 percent increase. Countries with increased exports were the FSU-12 (Russia 27 million bushels; the Ukraine 477 million bushels, and Kazakhstan 46 million bushels), the EU-28 (732 million bushels), Canada (218 million bushels), and Australia (215 million bushels). Lower exports were reported for the U.S. (-187 million bushels), and Argentina (-61 million bushels). During the last 10 years, world wheat production and exports have shifted to the FSU and EU countries, along with China and India. Improved production practices and technology may have resulted in higher yields and increased harvested acres. The facts indicate that the world wheat market has changed; those changes are probably permanent; and the changes are not favorable for U.S. wheat production or prices. Source: Kim Anderson, Southwest Farm Press
National
Beneficial moisture to expand across the Plains
Across the Corn Belt, showers are confined to the upper Great Lakes region. Elsewhere, very warm, dry weather is ideal for developmentally delayed corn and soybeans. On September 17, corn was at least 15 percentage points behind the 5-year state average maturation pace in Illinois, Iowa, Minnesota, Wisconsin, and the Dakotas. On the Plains, late-season heat across most of the region continues to promote summer crop maturation and fieldwork, including harvest activities and winter wheat planting. Continue reading Beneficial moisture to expand across the Plains at Brownfield Ag News.      
A big change in weather on the Plains
Recovery from Hurricanes Irma and Maria continues across Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, although locally heavy showers, pockets of flash flooding, and widespread power outages are disrupting clean-up efforts. Meanwhile, a cold front continues to advance eastward across the Rockies and High Plains, forming a stark boundary between warm weather in the eastern half of the U.S. and chilly conditions in the West. During the weekend, precipitation will subside across the Intermountain West and develop along an axis stretching from the southern High Plains into the upper Midwest. Continue reading A big change in weather on the Plains at Brownfield Ag News.      
Soybean harvest underway for Minnesota farmer
The 2017 soybean harvest is underway for a farmer south of the Twin Cities. Brent Mohn of Lakeville says the field being combined Friday was planted the 15th of May. “The soybeans we’re in today definitely got hit by some white mold.? They’re still yielding fair.? We’re kind of floating in the 50 range.? You get into some of the pockets where there wasn’t white mold (and) they’re pushing the mid-70’s.” He tells Brownfield soybean moisture climbed from 12 to 14 percent because of late-week heat and humidity. Continue reading Soybean harvest underway for Minnesota farmer at Brownfield Ag News.      
Red meat stocks down, still ample
The USDA says red meat supplies in cold storage at the end of August were 1% below year ago levels at 1.1 billion pounds. However, both pork and beef stocks were larger than what some analysts had been expecting and above their respective five year averages following heavier than normal in-movement as high levels of red meat production cancel out any improvement in demand. Pork stocks totaled 575.681 million pounds, up 4% on the month, down 5% on the year, with beef stocks at 476.260 million pounds, 10% higher than the previous month, slightly lower than last year. Continue reading Red meat stocks down, still ample at Brownfield Ag News.      
DuPont Pioneer backs away from control claims
DuPont Pioneer says its Cry1F trait, Herculex I Bt, no longer protects corn against the western bean cutworm. Cry1F was a corn borer toxin to begin with, not a western bean cutworm toxin, according to Chris DiFonzo, an extension entomologist at Michigan State University. ?The control was never excellent,? DiFonzo told Brownfield Ag News Friday, ?and the wide-spread planting allowed for the rapid development of resistance.? DuPont Pioneer Scientific Affairs Director Clint Pilcher acknowledges a decrease in susceptibility among western bean cutworm populations.? Continue reading DuPont Pioneer backs away from control claims at Brownfield Ag News.      
Solid demand supports soybeans, corn
Soybeans were higher on commercial and technical buying, posting a positive week to week finish. Mexico bought 190,000 tons of 2017/18 U.S. beans, continuing the recent hot streak of sales. Mexico is the second biggest buyer of U.S. beans, after China, but has only purchased about one tenth of Beijing?s marketing year to date total. The trade is watching near term weather in the Midwest and Plains, which mostly looks non-threatening. Soybean meal was higher and bean oil was lower on the adjustment of product spreads. Continue reading Solid demand supports soybeans, corn at Brownfield Ag News.      
Cattle futures close higher on short covering
At the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, cattle futures closed higher on short covering.? Some support also came from the anticipation of Friday?s placement number, however that did not happen. Wholesale beef prices have stabilized some this week and are also providing some support to cattle futures.? October live cattle closed $1.47 higher at $111.57 December live cattle closed $1.22 higher at $117.42.? September feeder cattle are $.22 higher at $153.40 and October feeder cattle closed $.22 higher at $156.10. Continue reading Cattle futures close higher on short covering at Brownfield Ag News.      
Soybean futures back above 200-day moving averages
An analyst says soybean futures had a surprisingly strong finish to the week. The November contract closed 13 ? cents higher at $9.84 1/4 Friday, and January settled within six cents of the $10-dollar level. Tony Headrick with CHS Hedging tells Brownfield some key contracts are back above their 200-day moving averages. “To a degree, (I’m) surprised.? There was some indication of corn and soybean fund activity that were buyers coming in today.? Continue reading Soybean futures back above 200-day moving averages at Brownfield Ag News.      
Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: September 22, 2017
Dec. corn closed at $3.53 and 1/2,?up 3 and 1/4 cents Nov. soybeans closed at $9.84 and 1/4,?up?13 and 1/2?cents Oct. soybean meal closed at $315.00,?up?$6.00 Oct. soybean oil closed at 33.99,?down?11?points Dec. wheat closed at $4.49 and 1/2,?down 3?cents Oct. live cattle closed at $111.57,?up $1.47 Oct. lean hogs closed at $55.70,?down $1.62 Nov. Continue reading Closing Grain and Livestock Futures: September 22, 2017 at Brownfield Ag News.      
Milk futures, cash cheese higher
Class III milk futures at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange were supported by follow through buying. September was $.02 higher at $16.37, October was up $.15 at $16.17, November was $.30 higher at $16.25, and December was up $.26 at $16.09. Cash cheese blocks were $.02 higher at $1.6125. Five loads were sold, including two at $1.6125. The last uncovered offer was for two loads at $1.62. Barrels were up seven at $1.60. Continue reading Milk futures, cash cheese higher at Brownfield Ag News.      
Cost of drying grain probably going up
The cost of drying grain is likely going up as harvest progresses. CHS Hedging energy analyst Tony Headrick says propane exports remain strong. “That export channel is expected to continue to remain open for two reasons.? One is that the Dollar is weaker, and number two is that international propane prices are higher.” Headrick tells Brownfield if a large amount of the U.S crop needs to be dried down, he?s concerned a propane shortage will lead to escalating prices through at least winter. Continue reading Cost of drying grain probably going up at Brownfield Ag News.      
Incorporating warm season annuals into cool season pastures
A southeast Minnesota farmer is incorporating warm season annuals into cool season pastures. Kaleb Anderson has a diversified crop and livestock farm in Goodhue County, utilizing various grazing strategies for his cattle. He?s in year two of mob-grazing pasture mid-summer to create a seed bed for drilling warm season annuals. “If you look at a cool season growth curve, the growth in the spring is really high.? Continue reading Incorporating warm season annuals into cool season pastures at Brownfield Ag News.      
Seatbelts in tractors/combines for good reason
A farm safety specialist says farmers might not realize how much seatbelts matter to their safety, ?I?m making a pitch that they start using those seatbelts that come with their tractors.? Rob Mastick with American Family Insurance says ?the reason is, you might break an axle in the field and if you don?t have it on, you might get bounced pretty badly? but out on the road if the farmer hits a soft shoulder at 25 to 30 miles an hour, or someone runs into THEM, that can result in significant injuries, ?I?ve been doing this for about 30 years and I ask every farmer the question, ?Do you use the seatbelts that are on there??; and I have never one time got an answer ?yes.?? And, he tells Brownfield, wearing seatbelts in tractors and combines?reduces potential injuries out in the field during harvest or any time. Continue reading Seatbelts in tractors/combines for good reason at Brownfield Ag News.      
Midday cash livestock markets
  Light to moderate cash cattle trade is developing with live prices about $2.00 higher than last week.? While bids are firming up in parts of the North, business has not yet developed given the higher asking prices of $172 to $174.? Look for more trade to develop before mid-afternoon as short-bought packers move to cover immediate needs.? Bids are reported at $108.00 live and $166.00 to $170.00 dressed. Boxed beef cutout is firm at the midday with light to moderate box movement.? Continue reading Midday cash livestock markets at Brownfield Ag News.      
Arkansas Plant Board recommends April 15 dicamba cutoff
The Arkansas State Plant Board has voted unanimously to recommend a ban on spraying dicamba herbicide on cropland between April 16th and October 31st. The proposed ban would prevent in-season use of dicamba on soybeans and cotton. Proponents of the ban say it is necessary to avoid a repeat of dicamba drift-related crop damage reported by hundreds of Arkansas farmers in 2017. Opponents of the ban say it essentially defeats the purpose of the new dicamba herbicides, which were designed to be sprayed over the top of crops throughout the growing season. Continue reading Arkansas Plant Board recommends April 15 dicamba cutoff at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
Kubota To Open $90M Parts Center in Kansas
Kubota announces plans today to invest $90 million to build logistics hub in Kansas to deliver repair parts for agricultural equipment as soon as the next day starting in 2019
John Phipps: Will Farm Consolidation Consume U.S. Agriculture?
Grain farms reflect farmland ownership, more than farm economics. It’s really hard to operate huge farms in the absence of huge landholdings. We had a recent example. A landowner with a modest farm dies, and being without children, she leaves her acreage to 5 nephews. It took extraordinary effort from the one nephew who was farming the land to buy out or rent the other four shares. This disaggregation occurs constantly across farm country. Most grain farm acres are rented, not owned. When owners change, the operator often changes too. So not only does ownership fracture, tenancy is up for grabs. Also, my impression is big operations don’t have longer lifespans than smaller farms either. Big Time Operators come and go.
Soybean Market Unable to Take Out June, August Lows
Soybean markets are seeing life on Friday, jumping more than 13 cents. The reason behind the move may be unclear, but analysts on U.S. Farm Report this weekend like the signals the soybean market are sending.
Grain Prices Show Strength as Harvest Kicks Off
For the last three weeks, grain prices have held relatively stable. Jerry Gulke analyzes the reasons behind these positive price movements.
Drone Challenge Finalists Announced
Land O’Lakes named finalists in their crowdsourced competition to surface user-friendly drone solutions to help farmers make better decisions. ​
Make Hay While The Sun Shines
So why are the futures so sluggish? First of all, it is planting season in Brazil, and a futures rally in Chicago soybeans definitely encourages corn to soybean acreage shifts. Some interior Brazil corn prices were below $2.60 per bushel last week, which makes the shift attractive. The other item we note is that this is all catch up business. Chinese commitments were still only 84% of last year on September 14, which includes Thursday?s numbers but not the daily announcements this week.
Cattle on Feed and Cold Storage Recap
Results and analysis of the September 2017 Cattle on Feed and Cold Storage reports.
FMC Corp. Receives Clearances to Acquire DuPont Crop Protection Assets
FMC Corp. has received approval from the Competition Commission of India (CCI) for the proposed acquisition of a significant portion of DuPont’s Crop Protection business. The CCI is the final jurisdiction to grant antitrust clearance needed to satisfy regulatory conditions for closing. “FMC is pleased to have received CCI’s approval,” said Pierre Brondeau, FMC president, CEO and chairman. “We are on track to close our transactions with DuPont on November 1, 2017.” FMC announced on March 31, 2017 the signing of a definitive agreement for FMC to acquire a portion of DuPont’s Crop Protection business that it must divest to comply with the European Commission ruling related to its merger with The Dow Chemical Company. FMC will acquire DuPont’s global chewing pest insecticide portfolio, its global cereal broadleaf herbicides, and substantially all of DuPont’s global crop protection R&D capabilities. Additionally, DuPont will acquire FMC’s Health and Nutrition segment and receive $1.2 billion in cash.
Pro Farmer: Soybeans Respond to Strong Demand
Soybean futures were fueled by demand news.
Pumpkin Spice Addiction
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Univar Acquires Tagma Brasil
Univar Inc. announced that its wholly owned subsidiary Univar Brasil Ltda. has acquired Tagma Brasil Ltda., a leading provider of custom formulation and packaging services for crop protection chemicals. “Brazil has agriculture and agro-food exports of more than $89 billion and a domestic market that serves nearly 210 million people. This acquisition expands Univar’s agriculture business in one of the world’s fastest-growing agricultural markets,” said Steve Newlin, Univar’s chairman and chief executive officer. “In addition, Tagma’s formulation and packaging capabilities will enhance the value proposition for several of our key global supplier partners, and Tagma’s strong culture of safety, integrity and quality will be an excellent complement to Univar’s already robust agricultural business in North America.” In Brazil, Tagma is a leading provider of custom formulation and packaging services for crop protection chemicals that include herbicides, insecticides, fungicides and surfactants. Tagma formulates more than 200 registered crop protection products and provides conception and preparation of new formulations; adaption of existing formulations; and technical assistance with processing and regulatory requirements. “Joining Univar positions us well to be a more valuable, more relevant partner to existing and future global customers who are looking for supply chain solutions, and I am confident this will create opportunities and growth for our current employees,” stated Jos? Carlos Leite, president of Tagma. “Tagma allows us to more holistically serve customers in an agriculture market that is increasingly turning toward crop yield protection and biological add-ons,” added Mike Hildebrand, Univar’s president of Canada, Agriculture and Environmental Sciences. “We welcome this opportunity to expand Univar Brasil’s formulation and packaging capacity, which will allow us to serve our customers with increased capabilities and provide our suppliers with expanded market reach.”
Arkansas Plant Board Backs 2018 Regulatory Changes for Dicamba
The Arkansas State Plant Board voted to approve regulatory changes for the application of products labeled for agricultural use that contain dicamba in Arkansas. The regulatory changes will prohibit the use in Arkansas between Apr. 16 ? Oct. 31. The regulations include exemptions for the use of dicamba in pastures, rangeland, turf, ornamental, direct injection for forestry, and home use.? The approved regulations are closely aligned with the recommendations from the Dicamba Task Force and the Plant Board?s Pesticide Committee. The Board?s regulatory changes concerning the use of dicamba will now be subject to a 30-day public comment period which will be followed by a public hearing that will be held on Nov. 8.? Following the public comment and public hearing period, the final proposed rule will be forwarded to the Executive Subcommittee of the Arkansas Legislative Council for final rule approval. The board also voted to approve a new regulation that establishes notice procedures for requesting additional research and for restricting products beyond EPA approval. This regulatory change will also be subject to a 30-day public comment period which will be followed by a public hearing to be held in conjunction with the Board?s next quarterly meeting on Dec. 12. Following the public hearing the final proposed rule will be forwarded to the Executive Subcommittee of the Arkansas Legislative Council for final rule approval. The State Plant Board also held a public hearing to consider changes to Pesticide Enforcement Response Regulations in accordance with Act 778 of 2017 that increased the maximum civil penalty from $1,000 to $25,000 for egregious violations from applications of dicamba or an Auxin containing herbicide, or any new herbicide technology released after Aug. 1, 2017. No public comments were received and the regulation will now be sent to the Executive Subcommittee of the Arkansas Legislative Council for final rule approval. Other business before the Board included a review of the petition for rulemaking recently filed by Monsanto. The State Plant Board denied the petition by unanimous vote and will work with legal staff to prepare a response. The proposed regulations and other dicamba information and updates can be found at: http://www.aad.arkansas.gov/arkansas-dicamba-information-updates. The Arkansas Agriculture Department is dedicated to the development and implementation of policies and programs for Arkansas agriculture and forestry to keep its farmers and ranchers competitive in national and international markets while ensuring safe food, fiber, and forest products for the citizens of the state and nation. Learn more at aad.arkansas.gov.  
Morning Market Audio 9/22/17