@C - CORN - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Dec '17 348'4 347'2 348'4 0'2
Mar '18 361'2 360'0 361'0 0'2
May '18 369'6 368'4 369'6 0'4
Jul '18 376'4 375'2 376'2 0'0
Sep '18 382'4 382'2 382'2 -0'2
Dec '18 391'4 390'2 391'2 0'0
@S - SOYBEANS - CBOT
Month High Low Last Chg
Nov '17 969'2 964'6 968'4 3'0
Jan '18 979'4 975'2 979'0 3'0
Mar '18 988'6 984'4 987'4 2'2
May '18 997'0 994'0 996'4 3'0
Jul '18 1003'4 1000'2 1003'0 2'6
Aug '18 1005'0 998'4 1001'2 -1'4
Sep '18 994'4 993'2 992'2 -1'2
@K - HARD RED WINTER WHEAT - KCBT
Month High Low Last Chg
Dec '17 444'0 442'0 444'0 2'0
Mar '18 462'0 459'6 461'6 2'0
May '18 474'6 472'6 474'6 2'0
Jul '18 491'2 491'0 491'2 1'6
@L - LIVE CATTLE - CME
Month High Low Last Chg
Oct '17 108.275 107.300 107.975 0.400
Dec '17 113.500 112.575 113.400 0.450
@C - COTTON #2 - ICEFU
Month High Low Last Chg
Oct '17
Dec '17 69.73 69.31 69.61 0.34
Mar '18 68.70 68.40 68.66 0.36
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Local
Futures overnight traded both sides of unchanged in light volume. ...
Futures overnight traded both sides of unchanged in light volume. Yesterday afternoon, the USDA reported that corn harvest is 7% nationally, compared to 11% on average. Soybean harvest is 4% complete, only a point behind our historical average. The chatter in the marketplace continues about how crop conditions have been deteriorating and what the final production numbers will be. Traders continue to watch the dryness in Australia. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn up a penny, Soybeans down ? cent, and KC Wheat up 3 cents.>
National
Farmers consider ag equipment for upcoming growing season
  Cancelled field demonstrations because of rain didn?t stop farmers from checking out the latest ag equipment, research, and technology during the first day of the Farm Science Review. Northern Ohio famer Kevin Ruth says he spent his time exploring tools for his farm. One of those, he says, is the vertical tillage equipment. “I’ve been using cover crops for the past couple of years and I’m running into a little bit of a problem,” he says. Continue reading Farmers consider ag equipment for upcoming growing season at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
How To Be A Good Borrower
When it comes time sit down with your lender to review last year’s results and plan for next year, here are a few “can’t miss” suggestions.
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Futures overnight traded both sides of unchanged in light volume. ...
Futures overnight traded both sides of unchanged in light volume. Yesterday afternoon, the USDA reported that corn harvest is 7% nationally, compared to 11% on average. Soybean harvest is 4% complete, only a point behind our historical average. The chatter in the marketplace continues about how crop conditions have been deteriorating and what the final production numbers will be. Traders continue to watch the dryness in Australia. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn up a penny, Soybeans down ? cent, and KC Wheat up 3 cents.>
AGRONOMY SERVICE POSITION Aurora Cooperative is accepting ...
AGRONOMY SERVICE POSITION Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for full-time agronomy service and applicator positions with benefits at the York location. CDL and Hazmat preferred or able to obtain one. Contact Danielle Scheele at 402-366-2583 or send application to 1320 Road L, York, NE 68467. Aurora Cooperative is an Equal Opportunity Employer.>
Grower Sam Morse shared his favorite Curry hybrids with our David ...
Grower Sam Morse shared his favorite Curry hybrids with our David City location. Be sure to contact your local Aurora Cooperative agronomist to be included in our early seed incentives! #YourYieldsMatter>
There was not a lot of fresh fundamental news overnight. Harvest is ...
There was not a lot of fresh fundamental news overnight. Harvest is starting and moving along a very slow pace. Yield reports are coming in consistent with the crop tours last month -- variable. Weather remains mixed as the western Corn Belt is expected to receive additional moisture this week while the eastern region remains relatively dry. Crop progress will be released at 3 p.m. this afternoon and the trade is looking for steady to slightly lower crop conditions. On the open at 8:30 a.m., corn down 3 cents, soybeans up a penny, and KC Wheat down 4.>
Be sure to come visit our tailgate!! We have Brenden Stai and Calvin ...
Be sure to come visit our tailgate!! We have Brenden Stai and Calvin Jones here hanging out with us! ??
Don't forget our premium E15 blend available only at the Service ...
Don't forget our premium E15 blend available only at the Service Center, located on M Street in Aurora, will also be 25 cents off at the pump as well as our E15 at the other locations! Be sure to stop by and fill up on your way out of town for the game! #YourCornYourEthanol>
The smile on a happy farmer-owners' face is something we strive for ...
The smile on a happy farmer-owners' face is something we strive for every day. It takes great responsibility from both the employee and the owner to achieve this. Great partnerships and a systems approach with products is a winning combination that allows for great successes...but it takes both. Can't wait to see how this field yields at harvest! Check out our photo story below!>
September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month...so today we wore ...
September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month...so today we wore yellow ribbons
>
The soybean market is 3-4 cents lower on the open but are up a dime ...
The soybean market is 3-4 cents lower on the open but are up a dime for the week. The bean market has the potential to close higher for the 4th consecutive week in a row. Not a whole lot of fresh news is expected to be reported today with the exception of the NOPA crush numbers. The average estimate for August crush is 137.5 million bushels, this could be the largest crush number in 10 years. On the open at 8:30 a.m., corn down a penny, soybeans down 3-4, KC Wheat unchanged.>
#harvest2017
#harvest2017>
Be sure to stop by our tailgate before the game this Saturday for our ...
Be sure to stop by our tailgate before the game this Saturday for our special event! We are located west of the stadium in the lot underneath the overpass, along N 8th Street!>
Our Service Center station, located on M street in Aurora, will also ...
Our Service Center station, located on M street in Aurora, will also be offering a 25 cent/per gallon discount on our premium blend of E15! Stop by on your way out of town for the game to fill up and also to chat with members of the Nebraska Ethanol Board!>
Dave Harrington from our Animal Nutrition division interviews with ...
Dave Harrington from our Animal Nutrition division interviews with NTV's Steve White during Husker Harvest Days on diversifying livestock production.>
Be sure to stop by our A-Stop locations to fill up with E15 before ...
Be sure to stop by our A-Stop locations to fill up with E15 before heading to the game this weekend!>
Local
Futures overnight traded both sides of unchanged in light volume. ...
Futures overnight traded both sides of unchanged in light volume. Yesterday afternoon, the USDA reported that corn harvest is 7% nationally, compared to 11% on average. Soybean harvest is 4% complete, only a point behind our historical average. The chatter in the marketplace continues about how crop conditions have been deteriorating and what the final production numbers will be. Traders continue to watch the dryness in Australia. On the open at 8:30 a.m., Corn up a penny, Soybeans down ? cent, and KC Wheat up 3 cents.>
Corn Progress Lagging Average, Condition Trailing 2016
A fewer number of corn acres have reached the dented or mature stage than the five-year average according to a report released today by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. With 86 percent of total corn acres dented by September 17 and mature acres at only 34 percent, corn progress trails the five-year average by four and 13 percentage points respectively. The number of corn acres harvested also has fallen behind the five- year average given maturity delays, currently trailing by four percentage points. Additionally, 61 percent of all corn acres in the top 18 corn-planted states in 2017 remained in good or excellent condition, 13 percentage points lower than last year at this time. Source: AgriMarketing
Corn and Soybean Production Outlook in 2017-18
Given the price reaction, the market remains uncertain about the USDA’s September forecast of 2017 corn and soybean production. November 2017 soybean futures closed at $9.68 on Sept.15, down 7 cents on the day but up from the $9.61 close of a week ago. Despite the increase in corn yield, December corn futures prices stayed in a tight range between $3.53 and $3.55 to close out the week. USDA’s September soybean production forecast for 2017 came in at 4,431 million bushels, up 50 million bushels over the August forecast. Yield per harvested acre increased to 49.9 from the August forecast of 49.4. Compared to the August forecast, yield prospects for the top ten states in soybean acreage increased in Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Ohio. Yield prospects declined in Minnesota and Nebraska, although they remained the same for Illinois and Missouri. Despite the increased production forecast, total supply for the 2017-18 marketing year increased only 24 million bushels to 4.801 billion bushels. According to University of Illinois agricultural economist Todd Hubbs, the smaller supply increase was due to lower beginning stocks for the marketing year. Soybean crush and export estimates for the 2016-17 marketing year increased and lowered ending stocks by 25 million bushels to 345 million bushels. The USDA increased to 2017-18 soybean export forecast by 25 million bushels to 2,250 million bushels. This left the 2017-18 ending stocks forecast at 475 million bushels, the same as the August projection. “The seasonal average price for soybeans projected by the USDA is down 10 cents with a range of $8.35 – $10.05,” Hubbs says. “If production issues do not materialize, the rate of consumption for this large crop will be paramount. The ample supply of soybeans places an increased emphasis on the ability to export soybeans throughout the marketing year and brings South American production prospects in focus.” South American production for the 2017-18 marketing year is forecast to be 6,570 million bushels, down 4.7 percent from last year’s estimate, Hubbs says. The projected size of the Brazilian soybean crop decreased by 257 million bushels to a production level of 3,931 million bushels. “Current reports out of Brazil indicate dry weather is delaying the start of the planting season in many areas,” Hubbs says. “A weather outlook for Brazil indicates continued dryness, which may delay planting even longer and have implications for second crop corn planting in the region.” The soybean production forecast for Argentina decreased 1.4 percent from last year’s estimate to 2,094 million bushels. Wet weather appears to be influencing Argentine soybean planting. The Rosario Grain Exchange set soybean production within the country at 2,002 million bushels, down almost 5 percent from last year on tight margins for Argentine producers. World soybean production for 2017-18 marketing year came in at 12,803 million bushels, down 0.9 percent from last year. World ending-stocks projections decreased 9 million bushels from August projections to 3,584 million bushels, but are up 58 million bushels from the 2016-17 marketing year estimate. For corn, Hubbs reports that USDA’s September production forecast for 2017 came in at 14,184 million bushels, up 31 million bushels over the August forecast. Yield per harvested acre increased to 169.9 from the August forecast of 169.5. Compared to the August forecast, yield prospects for the top 10 states in corn acreage increased in Illinois, Ohio, Missouri, North Dakota, and South Dakota. Yield prospects declined in Indiana, Iowa, Minnesota, and Nebraska and remained the same for Kansas. According to Hubbs, total supply for corn during the 2017-18 marketing year was forecast to increase 12 million bushels to 16.585 billion bushels. The ending stocks estimate for the 2016-17 marketing year decreased by 20 million bushels to 2,350 on stronger exports and ethanol use. The USDA increased to 2017-18 feed and residual use forecast by 25 million bushels to 5,475 million bushels. Food, seed, and industrial consumption was lowered 75 million bushels on lower ethanol and industrial use. This left the 2017-18 ending stocks forecast at 2,335 million bushels, up from the August projection of 2,273 million bushels. USDA’s forecast for the seasonal average corn price also decreased 10 cents in a range of $2.80 -$3.60. “Production issues or sharp demand increases will need to materialize to exceed this range during the current marketing year,” Hubbs says. World production projections for 2017-18 decreased 3.6 percent from last year’s estimates to 40.65 billion bushels. The September world ending-stocks projection increased slightly to 7,971 million bushels for the 2017-18 marketing year and is down 964 million bushels from the 2016-17 marketing year estimate. The projected size of the Brazilian corn crop remained at 3,740 million bushels, down 3.5 percent from last year. Corn production projections for Argentina during the 2017-18 marketing year currently sit at 1,653 million bushels, up 5 percent from August projections and 2.4 percent from this year’s estimates. Chinese production is forecast at 8,464 million bushels, down 2.1 percent from last year’s estimate. “The reduction in production combined with a projected decrease in ending stocks in China by 787 million bushels encapsulates a majority of the ending-stocks decrease forecast for the world,” Hubbs says. The current weather outlook for the next 8-14 days projects warmer temperatures and more precipitation over many areas of the Corn Belt. “The drought monitor released on Sept. 12 indicated abnormally dry to drought conditions over large areas of Kansas, Iowa, Illinois, North Dakota, and Missouri,” Hubbs says. “Recent dryness may limit yield potential for soybeans and late-finishing corn in these key production regions. The market now anticipates the October production forecast. Barring a significant decrease in production, both corn and soybean prices will be dependent on strong consumption throughout the marketing year.” Source: University of Illinois Extension
Cover Crops Boost Yields and Weed Control
Following the use of cover crops, farmers reported increased yields of corn, soybeans and wheat, and improved control of herbicide-resistant weeds, according to a nationwide survey. In addition, the survey of 2,012 farmers showed acreage planted in cover crops has nearly doubled over the past five years. Survey participants—88 percent of whom use cover crops—reported that after cover crops: Corn yields increased an average of 2.3 bushels per acre, or 1.3 percent; Soybean yields increased 2.1 bushels per acre, or 3.8 percent; Wheat yields increased 1.9 bushels per acre, or 2.8 percent. A full summary and the complete 2017 Cover Crop Survey Report are available online at: www.SARE.org/2017CoverCropSurvey This marks the fifth consecutive year in which the survey reported yield increases in corn and soybeans following cover crops. It is the first year the survey team was able to calculate the impact of cover crops on wheat yields. The poll was conducted by the Conservation Technology Information Center (CTIC) with help from Purdue University and funding support from SARE and the American Seed Trade Association (ASTA). Regarding weed control, 69 percent of respondents said cover crops always or sometimes improved control of herbicide-resistant weeds. That is a significant number, as a majority of respondents—59 percent—reported having herbicide-resistant weeds in at least some of their fields. “In addition to yield increases, farmers reported other benefits to cover crops, ranging from improved soil health to better control of herbicide-resistant weeds,” notes Rob Myers, Regional Director of Extension Programs for North Central SARE at the University of Missouri. “For instance, 85 percent of the farmers who used cover crops said they have seen improvements in soil health. That reflects long-term thinking and a growing understanding of the enduring value that cover crops deliver.” Since SARE and CTIC began their annual cover crop survey in 2012, there has been a steady increase in cover crop acreage among participants. In this year’s survey, farmers said they committed an average of 400 acres each to cover crops in 2016, up from 217 acres per farm in 2012. They expected to increase their cover crop planting in 2017 to an average of 451 acres. One of the most important outcomes of the SARE/CTIC Cover Crop Survey is insight into what motivates farmers to use—or start using—cover crops, notes Chad Watts, Executive Director of CTIC in West Lafayette, Indiana. “Among cover crop users, we are seeing great enthusiasm for the soil health benefits of cover crops, with a widespread appreciation for the long-term benefits of covers,” Watts notes. “We’re also seeing openness to practices like inter-seeding and planting green, which raises cover crop use to the next level in terms of creating new options for species and mixes, and new opportunities to get even greater benefits from their covers. “Among non-users, we’re getting a strong signal that they want more information and training,” he adds. “The feedback we’re hearing through the survey will help guide the research and extension agenda to gather and share the information farmers need in order to adopt and succeed with cover crops.” In addition to the contributions of SARE, ASTA and Purdue, support for the survey was provided by ASTA members Beck’s Hybrids, Grassland Oregon, Justin Seed Company, La Crosse Seed, Monsanto and Seedway, with additional help from Penton Agriculture. A full summary and the complete 2017 Cover Crop Survey Report are available online at www.sare.org/2017CoverCropSurvey. Source: Morning Ag Clips
The Time Is RIPE to Transform Agriculture and Feed the World
Political and agricultural leaders gather at the University of Illinois today to see transformative work by scientists in the Realizing Increased Photosynthetic Efficiency (RIPE) research project, which has already demonstrated yield increases of 20 percent. A $45 million, five-year reinvestment from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), the Foundation for Food and Agriculture Research (FFAR), and the U.K. Department for International Development (DFID) will enable the researchers to continue their work to address the global food challenge. “Today's report on world hunger and nutrition from five UN agencies reinforces our mission to work doggedly to provide new means to eradicate world hunger and malnutrition by 2030 and beyond,” said RIPE Director Stephen Long, the Gutgsell Endowed Professor of Crop Sciences and Plant Biology at the Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic at Illinois. “This investment is timely. Annual yield gains are stagnating and means to achieve substantial improvement must be developed now if we are to provide sufficient food for a growing and increasingly urban world population when food production must also adapt sustainably to a changing climate.” “While no single strategy is going to get us there, our successes in redesigning photosynthesis are exciting,” said RIPE Deputy Director Don Ort, USDA/ARS Photosynthesis Research Unit and the Robert Emerson Professor in Plant Biology and Crop Sciences at Illinois. “RIPE has validated that photosynthesis can be engineered to be more efficient to help close the gap between the trajectory of yield increase and the trajectory of demand increase.” Building on half a century of photosynthesis research at Illinois, including several landmark discoveries enabled by state and federal partnerships, RIPE researchers simulated the 170-step process of photosynthesis. They used their computer models to identify seven potential pipelines to improve photosynthesis—and with the support of an initial $25 million, five-year grant from the Gates Foundation—began work in 2012 to try to turn their ideas into sustainable yield increases. Last year, in a study published in the journal Science, the team demonstrated that one of these approaches could increase crop productivity by as much as 20 percent – a dramatic increase over typical annual yield gains of one percent or less. Two other RIPE pipelines have now led to even greater yield improvements in greenhouse and preliminary field trials. “Our modeling predicts that several of these improvements can be combined to achieve additive yield increases, providing real hope that a 50 percent yield increase in just three decades is possible,” Long said. “With the reinvestment, a central priority will be to move these improved photosynthesis traits into commodity crops of the developed world, like soybeans, as well as crops that matter in the developing world, including cassava and cowpeas.” RIPE and its funders will ensure that their high-yielding food crops are globally available and affordable for smallholder farmers to help feed the world’s hungriest and reduce poverty, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa and Southeast Asia. But we still have a long road ahead of us, Long said. “It takes about fifteen years from discovery until crops with these transformative biotechnologies are available for farmers,” he said. “It will therefore be well into the 2030s before such superior crops are seen at scale in farmers’ fields.” Long and Ort are also part of the Department of Crop Sciences in the College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences at Illinois. Source: University of Illinois Extension
AGRONOMY SERVICE POSITION Aurora Cooperative is accepting ...
AGRONOMY SERVICE POSITION Aurora Cooperative is accepting applications for full-time agronomy service and applicator positions with benefits at the York location. CDL and Hazmat preferred or able to obtain one. Contact Danielle Scheele at 402-366-2583 or send application to 1320 Road L, York, NE 68467. Aurora Cooperative is an Equal Opportunity Employer.>
Corn Ear and Stalk Diseases Showing Up in Fields Marked by Stress
Harvest is nearing, but the scouting season is far from over. As the crop dries down, ear and stalk rots are starting to surface in cornfields across the country, plant pathologists warn. “Whenever we have a stressful growing season, then stalk rots can be an issue,” noted Iowa State University Extension plant pathologist Alison Robertson. The type of weather you had makes a difference. In droughty states like Kansas, growers are starting to see more Aspergillus ear mold than usual. This mold produces a dangerous mycotoxin called aflatoxin, which is toxic to both livestock and humans and must be monitored carefully. In areas that were wet early on and later turned dry, like Iowa, growers should be more on alert for Diplodia, Fusarium and Gibberella ear rots, as well as Anthracnose and Fusarium stalk rots, Robertson said. ASPERGILLUS SCOUTING Aspergillus sightings in Kansas follow the state’s droughty regions almost exactly, stretching broadly across central Kansas from north to south. “That’s what this disease likes: hot and dry and humid,” said Kansas State Extension plant pathologist Doug Jardine. He recommends growers scout drought-stressed fields and fields targeted for livestock consumption, particularly dairy. Aim to scout 20 ears in a few different spots in the field. “Pull back husks and look for an olive-green-colored mold,” Jardine said. “It can range from the size of the nail on your pinkie finger to covering half the ear. Smaller colonies are more common.” If you find it on more than 3% of the ears scouted, that’s a significant infection — but don’t panic. “Just the presence of mold has no relation to how much aflatoxin might be in the corn,” Jardine cautioned. “We’ve seen years with lots of mold but relatively little aflatoxin and vice versa.” Instead, target those fields for early harvest at higher moisture. “The drier the corn gets, the more likely infected kernels are to shatter, and shattered kernel finds are where the highest levels of aflatoxins will be,” Jardine explained. “If you can harvest at a little higher moisture so you’re not damaging kernels as they go through the combine, and then artificially dry the corn down in a grain bin with a dryer, you’ll help yourself out.” Elevators will draw samples and will dock and even reject any corn loads with more than 100 parts per billion (ppb) aflatoxin — the level at which it starts becoming toxic to livestock. However, aflatoxin levels as low as 20 ppb are not safe for dairy cows, which can pass it on through the milk. For more guidance on aflatoxin levels, see this guide from the National Corn Growers Association. Weather conditions this fall could affect the levels of aflatoxin found in infected fields, Jardine added. There is evidence that a field that dries down quickly is less likely to accumulate as much aflatoxin compared to one that dries down slowly. “Research shows that as corn dries down, the longer it is in that 20- to 25%-grain moisture range, that is the time that the fungus is potentially pumping out a maximum amount of aflatoxin,” Jardine said. Infected kernels will also be more likely to have lower test weight and shatter, so adjusting combine settings to maximize grain cleaning would be wise, Jardine added. Once your corn is in the bin, dry it as quickly as possible to 15% moisture, and dry grain destined for long-term storage to 13% moisture. Ideally, growers should also cool the grain down to 35 to 40 degrees Fahrenheit, which is difficult during warm fall conditions, Jardine conceded. Running dryer fans at night can help. For more details on the threat of Aspergillus mold and management options, see Jardine’s Kansas State University article here. OTHER MOLDS Any season stressor, such as foliar diseases, too much rain or too little rain, can increase the chances of stalk rot, Robertson warned. “If the corn plant hasn’t been able to photosynthesize efficiently and fill grain, it will start to cannibalize stalk tissue,” she explained. “Once it does that, any of the stalk rot pathogens can get in and take advantage of the lowered sugars in the stalk and the fact that the corn plant is more concerned with filling grain than defending itself against pathogens.” Robertson recommends scouting cornfields from the 3/4 milk line to black layer stages. For a good sample, pick a diversity of spots in the fields, from low-lying or light soil types to higher ground and heavier soil types. Aim to give about 100 plants the “push test,” she said. “Push each plant to the 2-o-clock position,” she said. “If more than 10% lodge, you might want to schedule harvest earlier for that field.” While you’re there, also peel back husks and check for ear molds, which prey on insect- or weather-damaged ears in particular. Reports of Diplodia ear rot, in particular, are becoming increasingly common in states like Illinois. Diplodia will coat the ear with fuzzy, white mold, starting at the base of the ear. Gibberella is a reddish mold that starts at the tip of the ear, and Fusarium is whitish to pink and can infect any part of the ear. See a University of Nebraska guide to ear rots here, and stalk rots here. For help storing grain infected with ear mold, see this guide from the University of Missouri here. Source: Emily Unglesbee, DTN
Grower Sam Morse shared his favorite Curry hybrids with our David ...
Grower Sam Morse shared his favorite Curry hybrids with our David City location. Be sure to contact your local Aurora Cooperative agronomist to be included in our early seed incentives! #YourYieldsMatter>
RNA Discovery Could Boost Plant Drought, Salt Tolerance
Texas A&M AgriLife Research scientists have discovered a ribonucleic acid, or RNA, that can increase the thale cress plant’s resistance to stress from drought and salt. The discovery could help illuminate a new pathway to engineering drought- and salt-tolerant plants, including food crops, said Dr. Liming Xiong, AgriLife Research associate professor, Dallas. The research is published in the journal Plant Physiology and online here. “This is the first finding of a long non-coding RNA, or lncRNA, that regulates plant tolerance to adverse, non-physiological external factors,” Xiong said. The lncRNA his team discovered in thale cress plants existed in low numbers under non-stress conditions, but levels increased when the plants encountered drought or salt stress, he said. Manually increasing the level of the lncRNA showed corresponding increases in drought and salt tolerance compared with plants where the lncRNA level was unaltered. Most RNA direct or “code” cell machinery to produce proteins. Non-coding RNA, or ncRNA, does not direct protein production but could affect how gene expressions manifest in innumerable other ways. As such, they are considered regulators of important biological processes, Xiong said. “And there are different types of ncRNA,” he said. “Small ncRNA have received much attention in recent years, but in many long, or lncRNA, like the one we found to affect drought and salt tolerance in thale cress, the biological functions remain unknown.” The basic difference between small and long non-coding RNA is the number of nucleotides — the structural building blocks of RNA. Long have more. Xiong said investigating the effects of lncRNA is a novel approach to plant drought and salt tolerance research. “Most of the current work on improving plant stress tolerance does not focus on lncRNA but on the genes that code protein production,” he said. “However, manipulation of those protein-encoding genes often impairs plant growth and development.” But the lncRNA studied by Xiong’s team can be tweaked without any apparent detriment to the plant’s health, he said. “It’s early still, but we could be on the brink of a whole new approach to engineering drought and salt tolerance in plants, including food plants,” Xiong said. “Our next step will be to engineer the lncRNA levels in plants other than thale cress and to test whether it might improve drought and salt tolerance across a broader spectrum.” Source: AgFax
Models Show a 60% Chance of La Nina Winter
Despite the dryness in the northern Plains, the month of August was one of the coolest on record. Read the entire article here.
Positive Yields Expected For Illinois Corn, Soybeans
It is looking like at least some harvest surprises may be positive after an up-and-down 2017 season in Illinois. The September 1 yield predictions released by the USDA this week are for Illinois corn yield to average 189 bushels per acre, up a bushel from the August 1 estimate. The soybean yield estimate is unchanged at 58 bushels per acre. Both would be outstanding after the tough start to the year and dry weather at times over much of the state. Many soybean fields in east central Illinois are dropping their leaves, and harvest is getting underway. While we don’t expect as many 80+ bushel yields this year as we had in 2016, pod numbers look better than many had expected after dry weather in August and September. Rain now might boost yields by a little, but only in fields planted late or with late-maturing varieties where plants are still green. Cool temperatures in recent weeks have lowered water use rates, though, and we aren’t seeing the premature leaf drop that sometimes signals an early end to seedfilling due to lack of water. With high temperatures in the 80s now and expected for the next week or more, the process of shedding leaves and drying down will accelerate, and it will be important to try to harvest soybeans at seed moisture above 10 percent. While some rain would help lawns and still-green crops, it would be better for the pod integrity if it stayed dry until after harvest, especially if temperatures stay high. With high temperatures, seeds and pods following maturity will dry within hours instead of days, and we need to be alert and ready to harvest as soon as plants can be cut and seed moisture is at 12 or 13 percent. If moisture drops to 10 percent or less during harvest, it might be worth stopping until pods and seeds take on some moisture in the evening or overnight. Breeding and the use of improved combine headers have reduced pod shatter, but seeds less than 10 to 11 percent moisture can crack more easily. This might be one of those years with frequent switching between soybeans and corn harvest. The corn crop in many fields is also looking a little better than expected as the leaves dry down and ears start to drop. As of September 10, two percent of the state’s corn crop had been harvested, mostly in southern Illinois. Yield reported so far range from low to high, reflecting differences in planting (or replanting) time, ability of soil to hold water for the crop, and whether rain fell or didn’t fall at critical times. Nearly all of Illinois had below-normal rainfall in August, and little or no rain has fallen over most of Illinois during the first half of September. Dry soils during grainfill can decrease leaf photosynthesis, and when that happens, sugars are pulled out of the stalk into the ear to fill the grain. This leaves the stalks more susceptible to stalk-rotting fungi, and so more subject to lodging. So fields – especially those where leaves dried up earlier than expected – should be checked for stalk strength. Good growing conditions in July can increase the deposition of stalk-strengthening lignin, however, making stalks less likely to break even if sugars are pulled out. So as long as winds stay relatively calm, lodging is not expected to be much of a threat, especially in those parts of the state that received more rainfall in July and August. Below-normal temperatures in recent weeks – most of central and northern Illinois are now about 150 GDD behind normal since May 1 – have slowed grainfilling rates and delayed maturity of the corn crop. The cooler temperatures have probably been positive for yields, by extending the water supply into mid-September. But the mid-August predictions that early-planted fields would mature by late August or early September didn’t happen. With GDD accumulation rates now above normal, a lot of fields will reach physiological maturity quickly, and grain will start to dry down. High temperatures mean rapid grain moisture loss; we’ve seen moisture loss as high one percent per day under high temperatures, especially if it’s breezy. Dry conditions over the past month have limited the spread of ear rots. Most kernels now have the bright yellow color we like to see at harvest, and if the grain reaches maturity and can be harvested without an extended period of wet weather, we can expect grain quality to be good. Harvesting at high moisture and drying at high temperatures, or storing grain without proper care, can all compromise quality, however, and can mean getting a lower price for the crop. One issue that often comes up for discussion during corn harvest is that of corn test weight. If test weight turns out to be lower than the standard of 56 pounds per bushel, many people consider that a sign that something went wrong during grainfill, leaving yield less than it could have been. And, test weights in the high 50s or above are often taken as a sign that kernels filed extraordinarily well, and that yield was maximized. Neither of these is very accurate –high yields often have test weights less than 56 pounds, and grain from lower-yielding fields can have high test weights. Test weight is bulk density – it measures the weight of grain in 1.24 cubic feet, which is the volume of a bushel. Kernel density is the weight of a kernel divided by its volume, so does not include air like bulk density does. Kernel density is a more useful measure of soundness and quality than is test weight, but is harder to measure. A typical kernel density might be 91 pounds per 1.24 cubic feet of actual kernel volume. So a bushel of corn grain is about 56/91 = 62 percent kernel weight; the other 38 percent of the volume is air. Kernels with higher density tend to produce higher test weights, but only if they fit together without a lot of air space. Popcorn, as an example, has small, high-density kernels that fit together well, and a typical test weight of 65 pounds per bushel. Hybrid genetics, growing conditions, and grain moisture at which test weight is measured can all affect test weight. If kernels appear to be well-filled, without a shrunken base that can signal that grainfill ended prematurely, it’s likely that they filled to their capacity and that yield was not compromised even if test weight is less than 56 pounds per bushel. For reasons that go back to an earlier time, though, corn needs to have a test weight of at least 54 pounds per bushel in order to be sold as U.S. No. 2 corn, which is the most common market class. Corn with a test weight of 52 or 53 might not be docked in price if it can be blended with higher test weight corn to reach the minimum. That’s much easier to do in a year when test weights are generally good. We expect that 2017 might be such a year. Source: Emerson Nafziger, University of Illinois Extension
Plan Harvest to Deliver Soybeans at the Optimum Moisture
When is getting docked by your grain elevator for selling soybeans over 13% moisture not a bad thing? When it means your net income actually improves over what it would have been if you'd sold your soybeans at a lower moisture level, for example 9%, to avoid a dockage. Most soybeans are harvested and delivered directly to an elevator instead of being placed in on-farm storage. Soybeans delivered below or above 13% moisture—the elevator standard—lose potential profit. At greater than 13% moisture, there is a moisture dock on the scale ticket for delivering wet beans, resulting in a lower price per bushel. And with less than 13% moisture, profit is lost because there are fewer “bushels” to sell rather than a dockage on the ticket (Table 1). There are fewer bushels because the load weight is divided by 60 pounds per bushel (assuming 13% moisture) rather than by the actual pounds per bushel for the moisture content of the beans at the time of delivery What difference does harvesting and selling soybeans at 8% or 9% compared to 13% moisture mean to your bottom line? If you sell soybeans at 8% moisture, you're losing about 5.43% of your yield; at 9% moisture, it's 4.4%; at 10% moisture, 3.3%; at 11% moisture, 2.25%; and at 12% moisture, it's 1.14% yield loss. That does not take into account additional risk for shatter losses during harvest. For a field that's yielding 75 bu/ac, harvesting it at 9% results in selling 3.3 fewer bushels per acre based on weight because you are not selling the water that you are entitled to sell if the beans were at 13% moisture. With soybeans priced at $9/bushel, that's a loss of about $30 per acre. A study of farmer practices was conducted in Hamilton and York counties by former extension educators Andy Christiansen and Gary Zoubek. They collected information from 115 truckloads of soybean that were harvested and being delivered to the elevators (Figure 1). Of those sampled, 5 loads were less than 8.9% moisture; 14 loads were 9-9.9%; 28 loads were 10-10.9%; 27 loads were 11-11.9%; 29 loads were 12-12.9%; 9 loads were 13-13.9% and only 3% loads were 14-14.9% moisture. For Example To see how this might work, let's look at a case in southeast Nebraska where a grower is selling soybeans yielding 75 bu/ac. Based on information from a local elevator, growers are docked for soybeans sold at over 13% moisture at the following rates: 13.1% to 13.5% moisture — 1.5% price dock 13.6% to 14% moisture — 3% price dock 14.1% to 14.5% moisture — 4.5% price dock 14.6% to 15% moisture — 6% price dock Example 1. If the grower were to sell beans at 13.8% moisture, they would be docked 3% of the selling price of $8.75/bu, reducing the actual price to $8.49 per bushel. Total income per acre would be: 75 bu/ac yield x $8.49/bu = $636.75 per acre gross Example 2. If the soybeans were harvested at 9% moisture, there would be 3.3 fewer bushels per acre to sell (4.4% of 75 bu/ac yield due to water loss; see Table 1): 75 bu/ac - 3.3 bu/ac =71.7 bu/ac yield x $8.75 = $627.38 per acre gross In this example it would be better to take a dockage for selling beans at 13.8% moisture than sell them at 9%. The difference is a positive gain of $9.37 per acre. In practice the grower would likely see an even greater benefit from selling beans at 13.8% moisture due to reduced shatter loss from 9% soybeans. Source: Randy Pryor, University of Nebraska CropWatch
There was not a lot of fresh fundamental news overnight. Harvest is ...
There was not a lot of fresh fundamental news overnight. Harvest is starting and moving along a very slow pace. Yield reports are coming in consistent with the crop tours last month -- variable. Weather remains mixed as the western Corn Belt is expected to receive additional moisture this week while the eastern region remains relatively dry. Crop progress will be released at 3 p.m. this afternoon and the trade is looking for steady to slightly lower crop conditions. On the open at 8:30 a.m., corn down 3 cents, soybeans up a penny, and KC Wheat down 4.>
Be sure to come visit our tailgate!! We have Brenden Stai and Calvin ...
Be sure to come visit our tailgate!! We have Brenden Stai and Calvin Jones here hanging out with us! ??
Don't forget our premium E15 blend available only at the Service ...
Don't forget our premium E15 blend available only at the Service Center, located on M Street in Aurora, will also be 25 cents off at the pump as well as our E15 at the other locations! Be sure to stop by and fill up on your way out of town for the game! #YourCornYourEthanol>
National
Farmers consider ag equipment for upcoming growing season
  Cancelled field demonstrations because of rain didn?t stop farmers from checking out the latest ag equipment, research, and technology during the first day of the Farm Science Review. Northern Ohio famer Kevin Ruth says he spent his time exploring tools for his farm. One of those, he says, is the vertical tillage equipment. “I’ve been using cover crops for the past couple of years and I’m running into a little bit of a problem,” he says. Continue reading Farmers consider ag equipment for upcoming growing season at Brownfield Ag News.      
Farm Science Review is underway
The latest in ag equipment, technology, research, and education are in the spotlight at this year?s Farm Science Review. Show manager Nick Zachrich tells Brownfield the 600 exhibitors will showcase equipment and farming practices to maximize farmers? return on investment as they face another year of tight margins. ?There are a lot of farmers that are tightening their belts but there is also money to be had to make their operations more efficient. Continue reading Farm Science Review is underway at Brownfield Ag News.      
Updated app enhances farmer?s experience
Farm Science Review manager Nick Zachrich says attendees can map their show this year with an updated mobile app and interactive map. “People will remember seeing products and what they were by and then we have to help them remember what they saw,” he says. “The app will help with that…and if you do see something you like you can make a note and a favorite on those exhibitors so you can go back to those when you get home from the show.” He tells Brownfield?the app pairs with the online directory and visitors?can make their trip more efficient by selecting the exhibitors and products they want to see. Continue reading Updated app enhances farmer’s experience at Brownfield Ag News.      
Soybeans, corn down, expecting non-threatening weather
Soybeans were modestly lower on fund and technical selling, essentially following through on Monday?s weak finish. Development and harvest are both slower than average, but warm, dry weather in most of the Midwest and Plains should speed those up. After a generally dry August, the USDA could lower its yield estimate next month. Losses were limited by solid export and domestic demand. No new sales were announced Tuesday morning, but U.S. bean prices are below Brazil and according to wire reports, demand from China should stay strong for a while. Continue reading Soybeans, corn down, expecting non-threatening weather at Brownfield Ag News.      
CoBank report shows milk production outpacing processing capacity
A CoBank report says milk processors are struggling to keep pace with growing milk production. Senior Dairy Economist Ben Laine tells Brownfield additional processing capacity has been built, but some regions have more production than processing capacity. ?He says, “Particularly the northeast and Michigan, the mid-east, those regions are very heavy in production and they’re exceeding their capacity right now, so what tends to happen is that milk starts to flow to the west.” And, he says processors are growing. ? Continue reading CoBank report shows milk production outpacing processing capacity at Brownfield Ag News.      
Strong move in feeders supports live cattle futures
At the Chicago Mercantile Exchange, live cattle trade was mixed most of the day but finished firm with support from the modestly higher close in the feeders.? October Live Cattle closed $.40 higher at $107.97 and December live cattle closed $.45 higher at $113.40.? Feeder cattle saw added support from Tuesday’s move in corn.? September Feeder Cattle closed $.77 higher at $151.57 and October Feeder Cattle closed $.85 higher at $152.80. Direct cash cattle trade has been at a standstill.? Continue reading Strong move in feeders supports live cattle futures at Brownfield Ag News.      
August milk production up on year
The USDA says August milk production in the top 23 states was up 2.1% on the year at 17.011 billion pounds. That is the sixth month in a row with a year over year increase in production and the fifth time this year production in the 23 leading states has topped 17 billion pounds. June’s total was very close, but just short. Production per cow averaged 1,948 pounds per cow, 26 more than a year ago and the highest for the month since the series of reports started in 2003, with the herd up 66,000 on the year at 8.732 million head. Continue reading August milk production up on year at Brownfield Ag News.      
Cover crops a Band-Aid for Earth?s soil
  A southeast Minnesota farmer likens cover crops to using band-aids. Ed McNamara of Goodhue County started incorporating cover crops in 2012 when thousands of Minnesota acres were prevent-planted. He tells Brownfield it recently occurred to him that cover crops are a lot like band-aids, with soil being the skin of the Earth. “It’s like when your mom put a Band-Aid on a scratch you had.? Continue reading Cover crops a Band-Aid for Earth’s soil at Brownfield Ag News.      
FCSAmerica/Frontier Farm Credit name new president/CEO
Omaha-based Farm Credit Services of America (FCSAmerica) and Kansas-based Frontier Farm Credit have a new president/CEO. He is Mark Jensen, currently the associations? chief risk officer.? Jensen succeeds Doug Stark, who is retiring. Jensen joined FCSAmerica in 1992 and was named senior vice president-chief risk officer in 2013.? Jensen was instrumental in modernizing FCSAmerica?s credit process and implementing an enterprise risk management framework. He graduated from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln with a degree in agricultural economics. Continue reading FCSAmerica/Frontier Farm Credit name new president/CEO at Brownfield Ag News.      
Milk futures mostly firm, cash cheese mixed
Class III milk futures at the Chicago Mercantile Exchange were mostly steady to firm on spread trade and oversold signals. September was unchanged at $16.27, October was up $.05 at $15.77, November was $.05 higher at $15.68, and December was up $.04 at $15.60. Cash cheese blocks were $.005 lower at $1.5925. Four loads were sold, including one at $1.5925. The last unfilled bid was on one load at $1.58. Barrels were $.0425 higher at $1.485. Continue reading Milk futures mostly firm, cash cheese mixed at Brownfield Ag News.      
Wisconsin corn, soybeans benefit from last weeks warm weather
Last week?s warmer and drier weather helped boost Wisconsin?s crop maturity.? The USDA?s National Ag Statistics Service says there were only a few brief scattered showers in the state. In northwestern Wisconsin, River Falls farmer Tom Gillis tells Brownfield his corn and beans benefited from that warm spell. ?“We’ve got a good dent. ?We’re about 25% milk line I would say, so we’ve got a little ways to go yet. ?There are a few, very few beanfields that are close to combining. ? Continue reading Wisconsin corn, soybeans benefit from last weeks warm weather at Brownfield Ag News.      
Iowa regulators reject bid to toughen livestock rules
State regulators in Iowa have unanimously rejected a petition seeking tougher environmental standards for livestock confinement facilities. The group called Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement sought the changes. But members of the Environmental Protection Commission (EPC) determined they lacked the authority to adjust the so-called ?master matrix?, the rules that govern where livestock confinement facilities may be built. During public comment, backers of the petition, like John Lichty of West Des Moines, argued Iowa is making little progress in cleaning up polluted waterways and called for tougher rules on livestock manure. Continue reading Iowa regulators reject bid to toughen livestock rules at Brownfield Ag News.      
Perdue visits Florida, later Texas with relief message
U.S. Ag Secretary Sonny Perdue went to Florida on Monday with a message of help for producers affected by Hurricane Irma. Perdue was in Georgia on Friday where cotton, pecans and other crops were damaged by the storm. He promised producers the help they need to recover, ?We?re going to do everything the law allows to be as generous, as compassionate, as quick as we possibly can to help you all restore as much as you can. Continue reading Perdue visits Florida, later Texas with relief message at Brownfield Ag News.      
Lighthizer: China a substantial trade challenge
President Trump’s top trade negotiator says China’s economic model is a threat to the world trading system that can’t be addressed under current global rules. In a speech in Washington Monday, U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) Robert Lighthizer said that China is a trade challenge substantially more difficult than those faced in the past. In the speech, reported by Bloomberg, Lighthizer said the sheer scale of China?s effort to develop its economy and to distort markets is an unprecedented threat to the world trading system. Continue reading Lighthizer: China a substantial trade challenge at Brownfield Ag News.      
Midday cash livestock markets
Direct cash cattle trade is quiet ? with just a few early Southern asking prices noted around $108.00 to $109.00.? The rest of cattle country is at a standstill and any significant trade volume will likely come later in the week.? There are a few USDA reports that come out later in the week, Livestock Slaughter on Thursday, Cold Storage and Cattle on Feed on Friday. Boxed beef cutout is higher at the midday on light to moderate box movement.? Continue reading Midday cash livestock markets at Brownfield Ag News.      
World
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When it comes time sit down with your lender to review last year’s results and plan for next year, here are a few “can’t miss” suggestions.
Most Memorable Auction
Machinery Pete recalls his most memorable auction
3 Tips for Keeping Quality Employees
Working with people outside of the family on a family farm can present challenges. On the Klein’s Seymour, Ill. farm, they strive to make sure everyone feels heard.
Read the Story From The Combines Not USDA, Pro Farmer
When USDA released its September Crop Production and World Agricultural Supply and Demand Estimates (WASDE), corn and soybean prices saw red.  ​
Tyson Plant in Doubt as Residents Rally
County Commissioners voted to rescind $500 million in revenue bonds for Tyson's new poultry project.
Survey: Global Adoption of Precision Agriculture
John Deere?s recent acquisition of Blue River Technology and its ?See & Spray? application technology suggests another major change in how crop protection materials are applied — and manufactured and formulated, possibly — may be underway. As a crop protection professional, your views on global precision agriculture and its current and potential on crop protection are very valuable. Could you please take a few minutes to complete the following survey? https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/globalprecision In doing so you will help us better serve your needs in this area. All individual responses will remain anonymous. Thank you in advance for your help. James C. Sulecki Chief Content Officer and?Head of Global Precision Initiative AgriBusiness Global? | Meister Media Worldwide
Key Senators Reach Tentative Budget Deal on Taxes: Corker (1)
Key Senators Reach Tentative Budget Deal on Taxes: Corker (1)
Perdue Tours Citrus, Pecan Crops Damaged by Irma
U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue has been traveling the states hit the hardest by Hurricanes Harvey and Irma.
Bower: Wheat Market Hits Bottom, Expect Increased Prices
Wheat markets are a long way from their summer highs. December wheat futures at the CME Group in Chicago closed Monday down nearly $4.40, nearly a $1.50 lower than the summer highs. However, Jim Bower of Bower Trading thinks the wheat market may be a sleeper.
Bayer Delays Monsanto Acquisition
Bayer officials no longer expect their planned $66 billion acquisition of Monsanto to close at the end of 2017, saying instead it should close early 2018, according to Dow Jones. 
Thailand Proposes to Ban Paraquat, Chlorpyrifos by 2019
Thailand’s Ministry of Public Health has proposed to ban the use of paraquat and chlorpyrifos by 2019, and NGOs including Thailand Pesticide Alert Network (Thai-PAN) are calling for the government back the proposal. Last week, Thai-PAN and alliances said they would demand the government support the Ministry of Public Health’s proposal, according to an article in the Bangkok Post. According to the article, Suwit Chaikiattiyos, Chief of the Department of Agriculture, said the Thai Ministry of Public Health’s proposed ban 2019 has an unrealistic timeframe. “Suwit said authorities still lack enough information on the health impacts of using these chemicals, which means a ban on using them by then is not likely,” the article said. CropLife Asia said that in the wake of Thai-PAN’s “continued efforts to limit farmer access to safe and effective crop protection,” it issued the following statement from Executive Director Dr. Siang Hee Tan: “Thailand farmers are facing enormous challenges. They’re being asked to grow more food to feed more people with fewer resources and less impact on the environment. That’s a tall order. “As stakeholders in the food value chain, we have a responsibility to help ensure the farmers in Thailand and the region are empowered and enabled to meet these challenges, produce the crops that feed our region and world, and realize a better life for themselves and their families in the process. That’s not a sole responsibility, it’s a shared one. “We are deeply disappointed in Thai PAN’s decision to continue favoring fiction over fact, and failing to put Thailand Farmers first. “Last month, Thailand Farmers from all over the nation spoke clearly, strongly and with one voice to ask for more access to crop protection technology – not less. The 21st century challenges of battling climate change and increased droughts, floods, pests, weeds and disease require 21st century tools; this includes the responsible use of safe, effective and innovative crop protection technology. “Ultimately, denying Thailand farmers access to safe and effective tools in the toolbox does damage to their competitiveness as well as that of the nation’s economy. “CropLife Asia is proud of its long-standing partnership and shared commitment with the Government of Thailand to ensure a sustainable, safe and secure national food supply. We certainly hope our Government partners and all stakeholders will recognize the fictional foundation of Thai PAN’s misinformation, consider the science behind the safe and effective crop protection products being reviewed, and put Thailand Farmers first. “We remain committed to supporting the farmers of Thailand, and look forward to continuing and growing the collective efforts and dialogue among all stakeholders to do just that.”  
Bayer Sees Brazil ?Returning to Normal in 2018?; Reveals R&D Plans
Condon Bayer said the global seed and crop protection market remains volatile in 2017, but high population growth, growing demand for feed and fuel and other factors support a long-term increase in demand that will drive business. ?Despite the current market volatility, our Crop Science business is well positioned to fulfill future customer, market and societal needs,? said Liam Condon, Bayer Management Board member and President of the Crop Science Division, on Tuesday during his presentation at the company?s Future of Farming Dialog 2017 on September 18-20. The event brings together thought leaders and stakeholders from across the agricultural industry to highlight the need for various groups ? including industry, government, academic and NGO representatives and from both the public and private sectors ? to cooperate to make the world?s food system more sustainable and thus fit for the future. Condon noted that high population growth, changing consumption patterns and increasing consumer demand for sustainably produced food will have a positive impact on food production, global agricultural trade and ultimately on farm income. ?Those factors combined with the steadily growing global demand for feed and biofuel feedstocks support a long-term increase in demand that will drive our business,? Condon pointed out. Business in Brazil expected to return to normal in 2018 Short-term volatility is always possible in a business dependent on the weather as well as pest and disease prevalence, especially in tropical climates such as Brazil. ?Over the past two years, lower pest pressure and drought in key parts of the country have led to lower demand for insecticides and fungicides,? Condon explained. ?We experienced a significant decline in sales and earnings in connection with historically high channel inventories at the end of this year?s harvest season in Brazil.? The elevated inventory situation affects the entire market but Bayer is likely to be more heavily affected due to its strong market position in both segments, insecticides and fungicides. Measures have been initiated in order to return to a more normal situation, for example re-allocation of products to different markets and lower sell-in. ?For 2018 overall we forecast a return to growth in Brazil,? Condon said during his keynote address at the conference. As previously indicated with the publication of the Q2 results, due to provisions for Brazil, Bayer is now anticipating sales of less than EUR 10 billion (previously: sales of more than EUR 10 billion) for its Crop Science Division in 2017. This corresponds to a low single-digit percentage decline on a currency- and portfolio-adjusted basis. Innovation is crucial for sustainable agriculture Focusing in his speech on sustainable agriculture, Condon also reaffirmed the commitment of the Crop Science Division to investing in innovation and developing customized agronomic solutions for farmers that address their individual needs and challenges. In this context, Condon emphasized that the proposed acquisition of Monsanto presents a tremendous opportunity to positively shape the future of farming. ?It is our responsibility to ensure that innovation is made available to farmers large and small, all over the world. Only then can we make a meaningful contribution to ensuring a sustainable world food system.? Bayer is also committed to helping meet the UN Sustainable Development Goals that are related to combating hunger and poverty and promoting good health and well-being, sustainable cities and communities, responsible consumption and production patterns as well as climate action and partnering. Progress being made in planned acquisition of Monsanto / Closing anticipated in early 2018 Regarding the process and time frame of the acquisition, Condon said that the company is making progress. In late June 2017, Bayer filed a submission to obtain antitrust approval from the European Commission. On August 22, the European Commission initiated a Phase II investigation. In consultation with the European Commission, Bayer filed an application on Monday, September 18, to extend the review deadline by 10 working days until January 22, 2018, with the aim of facilitating an appropriate evaluation given the size of the transaction. ?In view of this, an anticipated closing of the deal in early 2018 is now more likely than end of 2017,? Condon said. Bayer has submitted applications for clearance to almost all of the around 30 relevant authorities, and has already received approvals from over one-third of them. Digital Farming products successfully rolled out in more than 30 countries Condon also addressed the company?s efforts in the field of digital technologies. ?We are committed to investing at least EUR 200 million in our Digital Farming business between 2015 and 2020.? Already today, most new farm machinery is equipped with precision agriculture features. New tools help farmers optimize inputs such as fertilizer and crop protection agents with corresponding improvements in yields and quality. ?Innovative digital farming technologies help farmers big and small grow healthier crops more efficiently and more sustainably,? Condon said. Digital Farming solutions also help meet society?s rising requirements in terms of transparency and sustainability. ?We are therefore collaborating closely with highly competent partners such as Bosch and FaunaPhotonics, universities, start-up companies and nonprofit organizations like Quantified Planet. By donating and sharing proprietary data, we are contributing to research into biodiversity for the benefit of both agriculture and civil society.? Currently, Bayer provides digital solutions in more than 30 countries and is aiming to achieve rapid further expansion. The new technologies have huge potential not only in countries such as Canada, the United States, Brazil, Germany, France, Ukraine and Russia, but also for smallholder farmers in developing countries. Enabling smallholder farmers to reach their farming potential is key to increase agricultural productivity in a sustainable manner and to improve the lives of their families and communities. R&D investment of approximately EUR 1 billion During his keynote address, Condon was joined by Adrian Percy, global head of Research and Development for the Crop Science Division, who shared more information about Bayer?s R&D pipeline and investments. ?At Crop Science, we?ve been investing approximately EUR 1 billion annually in research and development to bring new products to the market to address the major challenges affecting farmers worldwide,? Percy pointed out. ?We?ve made it our responsibility to listen to our customers to understand the specific issues they face from country to country and region to region, better enabling us to deliver the customized agronomic solution that fits their individual needs best.? Crop Science R&D pipeline to bring 15 new products to farmers by 2020 ?We are very proud of our innovative solutions such as our Luna and Aviator Xpro fungicides as well as our Sivanto insecticide, which are all demonstrations of our capability to innovate. Not to mention our LibertyLink soybean seeds and InVigor canola hybrid varieties with our patented pod shatter reduction technology,? Percy said. ?These products have become significant contributors to revenue within just a few years.? Bayer has a variety of biological crop protection solutions in its development pipeline, for example Poncho?/VOTiVO? 2.0. A second, complementary bacterium increases the productivity of soil around the root, resulting in an increase of available nutrients for the plant to use. Percy also outlined the current Crop Science R&D pipeline with 15 active ingredients and traits / trait combinations to be launched from 2017 to 2020. The integrated pipeline also contains more than 100 life-cycle management projects as well as several hundred new seed varieties in vegetable and broad acre crops. The activities of the global R&D organization will be guided by R&D targets to address the major unmet needs of growers worldwide with future innovative solutions in chemical and biological crop protection as well as seeds and traits. While Bayer has a world-class R&D team working internally on innovation, the company has also established a successful external innovation platform to capitalize on the expertise and strength of many institutions, organizations from academia and the industry, and start-up companies with common purposes and goals. ?Through strategic research partnerships, crowd-sourcing tools and venture capital funding, we are collaborating on multiple fronts to ensure that we can continue to pioneer innovation in agriculture,? Percy stated. Recently, Bayer and Ginkgo Bioworks, Boston entered into an agreement to create a new company focused on the plant microbiome with an initial focus on nitrogen fixation. Improving the microbes? ability to make nitrogen fertilizer available for plants, offers a major potential benefit for sustainable agriculture and next-generation solutions to farmers biggest challenges. Cost of innovation is increasing In recent years, the average investment needed to bring a new product to market has increased, strongly driven by increasing regulatory requirements. Percy is convinced that Bayer is making a difference through cutting-edge science, and helping farmers around the world produce high-quality food, feed, fiber and biofuels in a sustainable manner. ?To safeguard these investments, we need a political and regulatory environment that fosters innovation and collaboration along the broad and multi-layered value-chain,? Percy pointed out. ?Our industry depends on scientific research to enable the transformative technologies needed for our future food security. If the public does not trust our science, then this security could be in jeopardy.? Commitment to transparency Percy also reiterated the company?s commitment to safety and transparency with reference to a Bayer initiative to grant access to safety-relevant crop protection study information used in the registration process. To start with, safety-related study summaries for a large number of active substances will be made available via a specially designed Bayer web portal. Additional information will be provided in the form of video tutorials, infographics and further elaborated scientific material. The website will go online at the end of 2017. In the next phase, users will also be able to request access to full, in-depth safety-related study reports. ?We want everyone ? from the general public to members of the scientific community ? to be able to access the information they want in a way that is fast and easy to understand,? Percy said. ?We also want the public to understand why and how we perform safety studies. This is a great opportunity for a beneficial dialog with the public about how Bayer ensures the safety of its products.? Societal acceptance is key to close the gap between producer and consumer ?We live in a post-truth era in which populism and political polarization jeopardize the acceptance of modern science,? Liam Condon noted in his opening speech to the audience. ?Well-established scientific facts are questioned by people who prefer to believe in rumors and emotional campaigns,? he continued and cited a recent Nobel Prize winner: ?Gaining consumer trust paves the way for the scientific breakthroughs needed to ensure healthy food for a growing population.? Closing his address to the audience gathered at Crop Science?s global headquarters, Percy emphasized the need for everyone in the industry to do a better job of listening to consumers? concerns and helping to answer the questions they have about agricultural innovations clearly and transparently. According to a recent global survey Bayer fielded with 10,000 people in 10 countries, more than 9 out of 10 people believe that ensuring safe, affordable and nutritious food for everyone through innovation is an urgent issue. However, many consumers remain emotionally skeptical about trusting science and research. ?Societal acceptance is key,? Percy noted and called for a multi-stakeholder approach to better engage civil society, especially younger consumers, through active listening, open dialog and better education about the benefits of innovation. ?That?s why we convened such a diverse group at this year?s Future of Farming Dialog ? bringing key voices together.? Bayer?s AgVocacy program, for example, provides comprehensive training to industry stakeholders to help them confidently share and explain their work to consumers, while agriculture education programs such as BayLabs, the global Youth Ag-Summit and Making Science Make Sense help introduce the next generation to sound science. In addition, the Bayer Bee Care Program as well as the Bayer ForwardFarming initiative are important dialog platforms which help close the gap between producer and consumer. ?Without industry research, innovations in agriculture to address our future food needs would be greatly diminished. As scientists, our challenge is to effectively engage and communicate on these issues,? Percy summarized. ?The future of food depends on a stronger bond between agriculture and society.?  
Fed Watch
Morning Market Audio 9/19/17
Corn Harvest Lower Than Expected
Grain markets await the next news story to move prices as US harvest reports officially begin.